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IASW Introducing Dolls in Wheelchairs

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MrMcDuck

Premium Member
Cool addition that fits with the theme and intent of the attraction. I'm against woke in most cases, but this isn't woke.

Not sure how people get Heaven or Utopia out of this ride. Of all the songs not to know the lyrics of... Then again, people sing along to that commie trash Imagine so perhaps it's more of a comprehension issue...
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
When a company tells analyst they are going to X and make less than X it means they were losing money. Disney was and is bleeding cash. If you don't understand how stock prices reflect the health a business go educate yourself.
You have demonstrated here that you don’t even understand the relationship between analysts and companies.

Also making less profit than analysts predicted does not mean you are loosing money.

I’m plenty educated on the subject.
 

VA2WDW

New Member
Sure they do…they represent ALL handicapped children…do the leprechauns represent ALL people of Irish decent?

So what your saying is that if Disney can’t represent EVERY disability, they shouldn’t add the children in wheelchairs? I’m gonna let you in on a little secret…not every country in the world is represented on iasw…OH, THE HORROR!!! Let’s shut the whole ride down

The largest increase of disabilities now is autism…many autistic children show no physical disabilities…in many cases (not all), it’s psychological or emotional, not necessarily physical…how do we represent that portion of the population? If I misrepresent autistic children and families, PLEASE let me know and I will apologize and take this post down, but I would THINK that any addition to represent disabilities would be welcomed.

I think it’s a great addition to the ride…plain and simple.
Adult with autism here. I greatly appreciate the increased awareness of invisible disabilities and think it's extremely important for people to recognize that autism is not something that people "grow out of" and that autistic children become autistic adults. Which means representation is very valuable for all ages. My daughter loves when she sees something meant to represent neurodivergence. She says "they're like you, Mama," and it means so much to her. But that doesn't mean that representation is always possible. Because it's invisible in most instances, it's extremely challenging to represent cognitive disabilities in things like a ride.

But seeing this kind of representation DOES matter.

The one thing I would say about your post that is a bit of a misrepresentation is that autism isn't a mental illness, it's not psychological. It's cognitive, which in turn impacts emotion, expression, interpretation of the world around us, and communication. It varies wildly from person to person, which makes representation difficult as well.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
You have demonstrated here that you don’t even understand the relationship between analysts and companies.

Also making less profit than analysts predicted does not mean you are loosing money.

I’m plenty educated on the subject.
In this case it does. They didn't miss the earnings because of a non-cash write down they lost it because they spent too much MONEY.
 

Smiley/OCD

Well-Known Member
Adult with autism here. I greatly appreciate the increased awareness of invisible disabilities and think it's extremely important for people to recognize that autism is not something that people "grow out of" and that autistic children become autistic adults. Which means representation is very valuable for all ages. My daughter loves when she sees something meant to represent neurodivergence. She says "they're like you, Mama," and it means so much to her. But that doesn't mean that representation is always possible. Because it's invisible in most instances, it's extremely challenging to represent cognitive disabilities in things like a ride.

But seeing this kind of representation DOES matter.

The one thing I would say about your post that is a bit of a misrepresentation is that autism isn't a mental illness, it's not psychological. It's cognitive, which in turn impacts emotion, expression, interpretation of the world around us, and communication. It varies wildly from person to person, which makes representation difficult as well.
Thank you for the education!!
 

RSoxNo1

Well-Known Member
The one thing I would say about your post that is a bit of a misrepresentation is that autism isn't a mental illness, it's not psychological. It's cognitive, which in turn impacts emotion, expression, interpretation of the world around us, and communication. It varies wildly from person to person, which makes representation difficult as well.
I largely agree with your post, but I would add in the word "spectrum" as well. As an example, you as an autistic person are clearly substantially higher functioning than my brother who is also autistic. I can surmise that simply by the preceding post that my brother would never be able to write or articulate. He also will never have children, because there is no world where he would be responsible enough to care for them.
 

HMF

Well-Known Member
I largely agree with your post, but I would add in the word "spectrum" as well. As an example, you as an autistic person are clearly substantially higher functioning than my brother who is also autistic. I can surmise that simply by the preceding post that my brother would never be able to write or articulate. He also will never have children, because there is no world where he would be responsible enough to care for them.
Functioning labels are not really accurate. Someone may be high-functioning at one thing and low-functioning at another.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
But they didn’t spend more money than they made. So they didn’t lose money.
No one ever said that they spent more than they made, but they spent more than they should have if they were going to meet the numbers the provided the street. The fact that they fired the CEO is fairly strong signal they are in trouble. You don't fire a CEO as fast as they did because they are farting rainbows.
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
No one ever said that they spent more than they made, but they spent more than they should have if they were going to meet the numbers the provided the street. The fact that they fired the CEO is fairly strong signal they are in trouble. You don't fire a CEO as fast as they did because they are farting rainbows.
You yourself said they were losing money. That means they would be spending more than they were making. That didn’t happen.

The missed expectations were not numbers they gave the street. Companies give guidance that analysts use along with many other factors to determine expectations. Disney didn’t tell analysts they would make more than they did.

There are many reasons Chapek was fired. Things were building. Poor performance is certainly one of them… the company loosing money is not.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
No. Not correct. Numerous factors can cause a company to not meet projected earnings not solely because they spent too much money.
Well think about it for a minute. If they hadn't spent 30 billion on content do you think they would have had such a large loss?
 
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