how will IP attractions hold up

peterwendy

Member
Original Poster
Disney is obviously going in the direction of adding rides based on popular IPs to the parks and if that's a good or bad thing is neither here nor there. But I was thinking about how some of these IPs will hold up in 10+ years (for example Gaurdians) and what Disney might do if these IPs become more irrelevant or unpopular as more bigger and better movies come out. Thoughts?
 

Think Tink

Premium Member
In the Parks
No
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I think that it is a risk of adding IP attractions in the park, but I would think after they become a park staple that even if the movie is no longer popular the ride still would be. Aerosmith is not a top band anymore (I do still love them personally!) but many people LOVE the Rockin Roller Coaster as it is a really awesome ride. Even younger people who may not have heard of Aerosmith.
 

V/N McQueen

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I really don't know how to answer this. M:B is a huge downgrade from ToT (effects and scenery), and people are eating it up. In the high standards that I (and many others SHOULD) hold Disney to, it shouldn't be this popular.

Indiana Jones however is one of the best rides at Disneyland. And ToT in Florida even has a Twilight Zone IP attached to it. I'm thinking it depends on the quality of the work and quality of the IP.

GotG is a great movie. The execution of the reskin ride was a failure, in my opinion.
 

JIMINYCR

Well-Known Member
It depends on how the attractions do with guest popularity. A good attraction thats thrilling, themed properly and satisfies guests will draw them and build lines for years no matter how a movie does. Disney wants guests to show up regularly, in quantity....they dont care why.
 

Gainesvillain

Well-Known Member
Even though I miss Maelstrom, the lines for IP-refresh are ALWAYS longer than before. Still early, I suppose. I can assume Coco in the Mex pavilion will have the same effect. I almost believe that Disney creates movies just to fill in places that lack some IP . . . No IP for the Japan pavilion? Let's make a hit movie about a samurai!
 

peterwendy

Member
Original Poster
I really don't know how to answer this. M:B is a huge downgrade from ToT (effects and scenery), and people are eating it up. In the high standards that I (and many others SHOULD) hold Disney to, it shouldn't be this popular.

Indiana Jones however is one of the best rides at Disneyland. And ToT in Florida even has a Twilight Zone IP attached to it. I'm thinking it depends on the quality of the work and quality of the IP.

GotG is a great movie. The execution of the reskin ride was a failure, in my opinion.

Right, I feel like they want to get IP's in as quickly as possible and in turn create rides/park theming that isn't going to last in the long run
I just worry that the modge podge of IPs will backfire when there ends up being no theme and they eventually have to do another overhaul to fix it
 

V/N McQueen

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Right, I feel like they want to get IP's in as quickly as possible and in turn create rides/park theming that isn't going to last in the long run
I just worry that the modge podge of IPs will backfire when there ends up being no theme and they eventually have to do another overhaul to fix it

Exactly. And this is giving us Universal style attractions. Disney used to be out of it's league but now i'm not so sure anymore.
 
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MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
IP brings interest. The quality of the ride is the real measure.

There's a lot of interest in Nemo and Mermaid, but their dark rides are relatively awful, and the lack of lines for those rides show it.

There was a lot of adamant lack of interest in Pandora, yet FoP will be a classic for decades, even if the sequels fail and it will be 2 hour waits for a long, long time.
 

TwilightZone

Well-Known Member
Splash mountain is still doing great despite it's source material being generally unknown and not being on digital/dvd/vhs.
So a new ip attraction that is fun and great will hold up the same, I believe.
 

TheDuke

Well-Known Member
Well obviously it depends somewhat on the IP. Snow White and Peter Pan are still doing fine. But with some of the less timeless blockbuster movies they run the risk of it being super lame in a decade or so, like at Universal for a while with stuff like Twister still being there.

But obviously if the attraction is strong enough the IP won't matter, as is the case in the RnRC example. I'm sure plenty of people who love ToT have never seen an episode of The Twilight Zone. FoP runs no risk of losing it's luster anytime soon no matter what happens with the Avatar franchise (I've never even seen Avatar and I love it, it's my new favorite ride)
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
IP brings interest. The quality of the ride is the real measure.

There's a lot of interest in Nemo and Mermaid, but their dark rides are relatively awful, and the lack of lines for those rides show it.

There was a lot of adamant lack of interest in Pandora, yet FoP will be a classic for decades, even if the sequels fail and it will be 2 hour waits for a long, long time.
This^^^

The IP is largely irrelevant as long as the attraction is good.
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
IP's are not a problem itself, classic WDW abounds in IP.

If IP rides strengthen the land and park they are all but timeless. Treehouse, Peter Pan, Star Tours, ToT.

IP's brought in for trendiness have not stood the test of time: Ellen 96 / Jeopardy, Stitch, the half-hearted tie-in attempts at Dinosaur and Mission: Space.
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
Disney is obviously going in the direction of adding rides based on popular IPs to the parks and if that's a good or bad thing is neither here nor there. But I was thinking about how some of these IPs will hold up in 10+ years (for example Gaurdians) and what Disney might do if these IPs become more irrelevant or unpopular as more bigger and better movies come out. Thoughts?
Aiming for the UNI model presents a risk to Disney, I think. You need a fast ride turnover if you want to rely on new and fashionable IP rides for a model. Shrek is old, Terminator is old. Transformers and Minions and Fast and Furious will be old too, soon.

What's more, Disney thrives on nostalgia and a certain yesteryearness. It is not edgy to begin with, that's simply not their identity. Every attempt by Disney to be trendy is as awkward or even cringeworthy as your parents dressing to young and trying to hang out with their fifteen year old kid's friends as equals. No, those few trendy words you picked up make you look old and awkward, not youthful.
 

ppete1975

Well-Known Member
My bigger fear is the ips that have live characters. Snow white is never going to be arrested for doing drugs out of the back of a mini van. But several people michael jackson, bill cosby, pee wee herman, oj simpson were all super popular at times and public opinion changed due to their actions. Lets say jimmy fallon kills three people or hurts a child. What becomes of his show? Its happened before with michael jackson. Cartoons or non ip based are safer. I feel if chris evans does something that marvel would be fine but who knows just my thoughts.
 

TwilightZone

Well-Known Member
IP's are not a problem itself, classic WDW abounds in IP.

If IP rides strengthen the land and park they are all but timeless. Treehouse, Peter Pan, Star Tours, ToT.

IP's brought in for trendiness have not stood the test of time: Ellen 96 / Jeopardy, Stitch, the half-hearted tie-in attempts at Dinosaur and Mission: Space.
If Stitch was not done to pull in the trendy 6 year old crowd and was closer to the original source and maybe a different ride system (rollercoaster or motion sim would have worked well), it would have been way better for sure.
 
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