How their massive HVAC system works?

baharini

New Member
Original Poster
Hi all, first post as I've been wondering this for ages.. (I hope this is in the right section)
WDW occupies a huge area and for the parks and resorts a massive amount of heating and cooling capacity is obviously required!
How does their air conditioning / heating system work? I assume they wouldn't have a chiller / condenser outside every building as it would produce too much noise, do they have a central chiller / heat plant or several of them located around the park? Or, is it provided by Reedy Creek Energy Services, I've heard of them before?
I can't begin to comprehend the capacity required to cool such a massive area in a Florida summer..
Thanks in advance!
 
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Tom

Beta Return
RCES runs and maintains the central energy plants. There are several on property, and at least one per park, if not more. Hop on Google Maps (aerial), and you can see Magic Kingdom's north of property.

They use chilled water, and steam I believe. Probably 4-pipe systems.
 

Jahona

Well-Known Member
I take it this is one of them for The Magic Kingdom? I wonder how efficient it is to move cold substances that distance.

Screen Shot 2015-09-03 at 3.32.32 PM copy.jpg
 

kap91

Well-Known Member
I remember once reading that the water in its a small world was used a part of the cooling system but that strikes me as unlikely.
 

baharini

New Member
Original Poster
Thanks Tom for the response. The size of the Magic Kingdom's plant sure is massive. Do even the smallest attractions / buildings use the central system? Also, would the utilidor system contain the chilled water/steam pipes, or are they buried separately? These are pretty complex questions but it's always fascinated me.
 

kap91

Well-Known Member
I don't think the water in IASW would be used. I heard somewhere they put dye in it since the water isnt actually that deep?

That would be the outdoor bodies of water (jungle cruise, roa) and I'm not positive but think it's only true for Disneyland as all the original water bodies in the MK connect to seven seas, bay lake, and about half of the water bodies on property.
 

MattyMitch

Active Member
That would be the outdoor bodies of water (jungle cruise, roa) and I'm not positive but think it's only true for Disneyland as all the original water bodies in the MK connect to seven seas, bay lake, and about half of the water bodies on property.

Even ride water?
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
I remember once reading that the water in its a small world was used a part of the cooling system but that strikes me as unlikely.
If this were so, WDW better be sure to stay on top pf the cooloing tower bacteria. Legionarres is not a good thing.
 

Tom

Beta Return
That would be the outdoor bodies of water (jungle cruise, roa) and I'm not positive but think it's only true for Disneyland as all the original water bodies in the MK connect to seven seas, bay lake, and about half of the water bodies on property.

They add dye at JC in Florida. None of the indoor attractions though.
 

Tom

Beta Return
Thanks Tom for the response. The size of the Magic Kingdom's plant sure is massive. Do even the smallest attractions / buildings use the central system? Also, would the utilidor system contain the chilled water/steam pipes, or are they buried separately? These are pretty complex questions but it's always fascinated me.

The majority or the piping runs through the utilidors. It's in buried utility banks between the tunnels and buildings.

I think some buildings may have their own packaged AC/heating units, but primarily they use air handling units, many of which are located indoors or even in the tunnels. Don't want a lot of noisy fans on roofs.
 
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Thelazer

Well-Known Member
ISAW has a chiller feed AC system. Air is static pressure, passed thru the chiller, chilled water supplied by RCES plant just behind the park. Most all rides and office locations inside MK are fed this way.

Epcot has a similar setup.

MGM / AK, do not have this type of setup.
 

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