Harbinger of the Apocalypse Day 1 No wagons and smoke

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Have we given up on this thread being about updates to how the smoking and stroller policies are working and one whole hog into it being a duplicate of the vaping thread? I hope not. Maybe it would work if people quoted and replied in the other, more appropriate thread?

Of course, maybe it doesn't matter anymore. Dogs and cats, living together, mass hysteria!
The thread has already been consigned to the "Politics and Social Issues" dustbin, which means there's no hope of getting it back on topic.
 

"El Scorpion"

Did you say "over"?
Premium Member
In the Parks
No
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I mean, that's what this thread was originally about.
At it's core yes it is. But it’s evolved into pontification. Without any real understanding of what was behind Disney enacting the policy. Disney didn’t do this because they thought smoking was bad. They did it because they thought it’d be good for business. We’ll see how it plays out

I can say though, I’m at Splitsville as I type this. And Disney’s new smoking policy has not impacted me in the slightest since day 2 of my 7 night stay.
 

Ladybat

Active Member
At it's core yes it is. But it’s evolved into pontification. Without any real understanding of what was behind Disney enacting the policy. Disney didn’t do this because they thought smoking was bad. They did it because they thought it’d be good for business. We’ll see how it plays out

I can say though, I’m at Splitsville as I type this. And Disney’s new smoking policy has not impacted me in the slightest since day 2 of my 7 night stay.
I hope you and yours are having the time of your lives Scorp! May the dust of Tinker Bell be always sprinkled upon you.

:joyfull: Me and mine will be there in a couple of weeks. I can hardly wait!
 

Lensman

Premium Member
I've only been cleaning mine with water and vinegar! I was afraid to use any thing harsher for fear it would damage the unit.
Vinegar is the right thing to use for periodic cleaning of the tank and water reservoir.

Some people like using a bacteriostatic agent in the water to prevent bacterial growth. It's also supposed to help a bit with hard water deposit build-up on the wicking filter used in evaporative-type humidifiers. The one I have in the bedroom uses an anti-bacterial UV bulb so I don't use the bacteriostatic agent in that one, but I do for the other higher capacity one that I have in the living room.
 

Ladybat

Active Member
Vinegar is the right thing to use for periodic cleaning of the tank and water reservoir.

Some people like using a bacteriostatic agent in the water to prevent bacterial growth. It's also supposed to help a bit with hard water deposit build-up on the wicking filter used in evaporative-type humidifiers. The one I have in the bedroom uses an anti-bacterial UV bulb so I don't use the bacteriostatic agent in that one, but I do for the other higher capacity one that I have in the living room.
I had no idea there was any thing else I could clean it with. But we have a water filtration system in our home. Reverse Osmosis. So the water I put in mine is not hard water. Do you think because I have RO water I still need to clean it with this cleaner you are talking about? I usually clean them out about once a week with vinegar and then rinse them and add a tablespoon of vinegar to the water I put back in them.

I have two humidifiers and both of them are used specifically to keep humidity levels up for my orchids and many other plants I have in my home. Both humidifiers are cool mist type ones.
 

Lensman

Premium Member
I had no idea there was any thing else I could clean it with. But we have a water filtration system in our home. Reverse Osmosis. So the water I put in mine is not hard water. Do you think because I have RO water I still need to clean it with this cleaner you are talking about? I usually clean them out about once a week with vinegar and then rinse them and add a tablespoon of vinegar to the water I put back in them.

I have two humidifiers and both of them are used specifically to keep humidity levels up for my orchids and many other plants I have in my home. Both humidifiers are cool mist type ones.
Unless the water starts smelling or mold/mildew starts growing, there's no need to do anything other than what you're doing now. You probably don't even need to put that one tablespoon of vinegar into the water (OTOH, if you stop and the water starts smelling, sorry for the bad advice!) OTOH, the vinegar will also lower the pH of the water and slow bacterial growth as well, so maybe just keep doing what you're doing?

In my area, the water company puts a lot of phosphate into the water to prevent lead piping from leaching into the drinking water. In turn, I think this phosphate provides good food for pink slime bacteria. To avoid having to clean my humidifiers too often, I started using that alcohol-based humidifier bacteriostatic additive I mentioned earlier. Periodically, I also clean the units with vinegar.

Your RO system will remove the phosphates and also remove the hardness that gunks up the evaporative filter. I'm jealous!
 

Ladybat

Active Member
Unless the water starts smelling or mold/mildew starts growing, there's no need to do anything other than what you're doing now. You probably don't even need to put that one tablespoon of vinegar into the water (OTOH, if you stop and the water starts smelling, sorry for the bad advice!) OTOH, the vinegar will also lower the pH of the water and slow bacterial growth as well, so maybe just keep doing what you're doing?

In my area, the water company puts a lot of phosphate into the water to prevent lead piping from leaching into the drinking water. In turn, I think this phosphate provides good food for pink slime bacteria. To avoid having to clean my humidifiers too often, I started using that alcohol-based humidifier bacteriostatic additive I mentioned earlier. Periodically, I also clean the units with vinegar.

Your RO system will remove the phosphates and also remove the hardness that gunks up the evaporative filter. I'm jealous!
Yes we love it but got ripped off on it bad. And in your opinion, do you believe an RO system removes flouride? That is a tough little devil to get out of our water when its added to it.

Our system is an excellent one BUT we did not find out till it was to late that we could have gotten the same system for a lot less money:bawling:
 

Lensman

Premium Member
Yes we love it but got ripped off on it bad. And in your opinion, do you believe an RO system removes flouride? That is a tough little devil to get out of our water when its added to it.

Our system is an excellent one BUT we did not find out till it was to late that we could have gotten the same system for a lot less money:bawling:
Regarding fluoride, it's not an area that I have a great deal of experience in, but from what I've read I'd go with "probably". Since some of the uncertainly involves exactly which system you have and how it runs, I might be inclined to buy a "cheap-as-possible" fluoride meter and test to make sure your system is working as hoped. Looks like you can get one for $170 on Amazon or less for a used one on eBay.

I feel for you on the price/value for money aspect. When it happens to me I try to chalk it up as an expensive lesson in life and try to think about how the experience is going to educate me to be smarter in the future. Admitting these mistakes and learning from them is the biggest hurdle and is probably the one thing that I'm most thankful that I'm able to do.

If you want some consolation, remember, you have an RO system and I don't. I still want one. So who's better off here? Hint: It's you!
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
Regarding fluoride, it's not an area that I have a great deal of experience in, but from what I've read I'd go with "probably". Since some of the uncertainly involves exactly which system you have and how it runs, I might be inclined to buy a "cheap-as-possible" fluoride meter and test to make sure your system is working as hoped. Looks like you can get one for $170 on Amazon or less for a used one on eBay.

I feel for you on the price/value for money aspect. When it happens to me I try to chalk it up as an expensive lesson in life and try to think about how the experience is going to educate me to be smarter in the future. Admitting these mistakes and learning from them is the biggest hurdle and is probably the one thing that I'm most thankful that I'm able to do.

If you want some consolation, remember, you have an RO system and I don't. I still want one. So who's better off here? Hint: It's you!
We're not allowed to have one where we live. :arghh:
 

Ladybat

Active Member
Regarding fluoride, it's not an area that I have a great deal of experience in, but from what I've read I'd go with "probably". Since some of the uncertainly involves exactly which system you have and how it runs, I might be inclined to buy a "cheap-as-possible" fluoride meter and test to make sure your system is working as hoped. Looks like you can get one for $170 on Amazon or less for a used one on eBay.

I feel for you on the price/value for money aspect. When it happens to me I try to chalk it up as an expensive lesson in life and try to think about how the experience is going to educate me to be smarter in the future. Admitting these mistakes and learning from them is the biggest hurdle and is probably the one thing that I'm most thankful that I'm able to do.

If you want some consolation, remember, you have an RO system and I don't. I still want one. So who's better off here? Hint: It's you!
First. Sorry about going off topic every one. Read no further if you do not wish to know more about water filtration systems!

We usually do our homework on things like this first but we had been flirting with the idea of getting a WFS for a long time and when we purchased our new home right after we moved in a sales rep came and did a presentation on his company's system and he did such a good job we found ourselves signing a contract that same day hook line and sinker! Its a great system but way over priced as there several other companies offering the same kind for a lot less money. Oh well. Lesson learned. But any way, this is what cleans the water in our home. It supplies the entire home with bathing and drinking water and so far its never gave us any problems. Its only a little over a year old though. But we have 4 bathrooms which it cleans bathing water for, our washing machine and all other water supply in our house. Then that conditioned water goes through another system under our sink to make our drinking water. I have 2 aquariums that I do not need to add any water conditioners for now because of this system and the difference its made for all my plants has been amazing as well. I highly recommend investing in a system like this for your home. Just make totally sure you have gotten a lot of estimates on prices of them first. Do not sign with any sales rep like we did until you have done all your homework on pricing.

This is set up in our garage which our water runs through first
376109
Hyperion Elite
How it Works
Hyperion Elite offers a state-of-the-art 5-stage water refinement system for your home. This 5-stage refinement process is controlled by our exclusive electronic digital control valve and uses 50% less salt than comparable systems.

1. Granulated Activated Carbon: Removes and reduces both chlorine and chloramines used by the city to kill bacteria, while removing foul odors and taste. Removing and reducing chlorine and chloramine levels is important to copper pipes, as well as fixtures with rubber stops and fittings.
2. Softening: Ultra high-capacity commercial grade resin softens the water to zero hardness.
3. Neutralization: Synthetic zeolite adjusts the pH of mildly acidic incoming water up to 0.3.
4. Filtration: A highly efficient media of aluminum silicate filters incoming water to 20 micron range, removing suspended solids not visible to the naked eye.
5. Clarification: Silica/quartz base polishes the water to a sparkling clarity while ensuring even distribution.

Salt Tank Construction

Extra large capacity
Safety overflow prevention float
Blow-molded, high-density polyethylene NSF and FDA approved tank with ultraviolet inhibitors
Periodic addition of rock salt required

Then after it goes through that water goes through another system under our kitchen sink to make drinking water
376113
Reverse Osmosis Systems
Pure Advantage
How it Works
Our Pure Advantage system uses a 5-stage reverse osmosis process to create an abundant supply of clean, clear, great tasting water at your fingertips. Instead of purchasing hundreds of bottles of water each year, feel confident about the water in your home with a system that’s used by major bottled water companies. Reverse osmosis is one of the greatest technological breakthroughs of this century, processing and treating water at a molecular level to remove any impurities and excess dissolved salts. With our FILMTEC™ TFC Membrane for increased purification, this system is made for excellent performance, reliability and serviceability.
 

Ladybat

Active Member
Yep. We aren't allowed to build tree-houses, either. There are some ridiculous rules here that, had I known, may have prompted me to look for a home elsewhere.
No tree houses either? Wow.

I found a web site that lists tons of old out dated crazy city rules that are still on the books. It lists every state and you can click on your home state and see a list of insane rules that will shock you and bowl you over with laughter.

Loony Laws

LoonyLaws.com is your guide to finding outrageous city ordinances and silly state statutes. What is it with these loony laws? If they aren't being enforced why are they still on the books? If they might be enforced how bizarre would we be living under these loony laws? We have collected some of the more jaw-dropping legal mumbo jumbo from various sources -- print and online.

Here are just a few of the laws it lists there from my own state of California. There are a lot more......

Redwood City has outlawed the frying of gravy.

In Santa Clara, it is forbidden to dedicate parking spaces to the patron saint of television.

Prostitutes in San Francisco are not obliged to make change for bills larger than $50.

The city of Mountain View proscribes calling pet fish by "names of aggressive content, e.g. 'Biter', 'Killer', 'Sugar-Ray'"

Bicycles may not be ridden without "appropriate fashion accessories" anywhere in Santa Clara County (de facto law).

In Blythe, California, a person must own two cows in order to legally wear cowboy boots in public.

In Los Angeles, a man is legally entitled to beat his wife with a leather belt or strap, but the belt can't be wider than 2 inches, unless he has his wife's consent to beat her with a wider strap. (Loony Laws" by Robert Pelton)

It is illegal to set a mousetrap without a hunting license.

Community leaders passed an ordinance that makes it illegal for anyone to try and stop a child from playfully jumping over puddles of water.

In L.A. it is against the law to complain through the mail that a hotel has cockroaches, even if it is true.

It is illegal to drive more than two thousand sheep down Hollywood Blvd. at one time.

It is illegal to whistle for a lost canary before 7 am in Berkeley, CA.

In California, it is illegal to posses bear gall bladders.
 
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