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Hand-Drawn Animation division gutted

Zman-ks

Well-Known Member
Sad news... :(
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bsiev1977

Well-Known Member
I don't think there is really anyone to "blame" here.
Though some may not like it, computer generated animation has supplanted traditional hand drawn as the dominant form of animation.
I'm not saying there aren't still many wonderful examples of hand drawn animation. Just that CG is what people want, and is what's selling big these days.
 

WDWGoof07

Well-Known Member
I don't think there is really anyone to "blame" here.
Though some may not like it, computer generated animation has supplanted traditional hand drawn as the dominant form of animation.
I'm not saying there aren't still many wonderful examples of hand drawn animation. Just that CG is what people want, and is what's selling big these days.
I don't really buy that reasoning. Disney still makes a lot of money off of old hand-drawn films, which suggests to me that the hand-drawn medium, in and of itself, is still viable. Traditionally animated shows, like Phineas and Ferb and SpongeBob, are still popular on television. The Lasseter-era hand-drawn films suffered from poor marketing more than anything else. This latest move by Disney just shows that they have no confidence in their creative product. Sad, very sad....I hope these talented artists find good jobs with another studio that will make good use of their skills.
 

mousehockey37

Well-Known Member
So since they've now gutted the hand-drawn animation, does that mean the Art of Animation building and the animation character "classes" that they have at DHS are now going to get axed too? I thought it was neat to see the animators at work. I didn't like it so much that they were on display like animals at the zoo, but it was still neat to see them doing work with animation cells and such.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
So since they've now gutted the hand-drawn animation, does that mean the Art of Animation building and the animation character "classes" that they have at DHS are now going to get axed too? I thought it was neat to see the animators at work. I didn't like it so much that they were on display like animals at the zoo, but it was still neat to see them doing work with animation cells and such.
Feature Animation in Florida was shut down years ago.
 

RandomPrincess

Keep Moving Forward
Most hand drawn animation shows no longer use cells they draw right into the computers now.
I don't really buy that reasoning. Disney still makes a lot of money off of old hand-drawn films, which suggests to me that the hand-drawn medium, in and of itself, is still viable. Traditionally animated shows, like Phineas and Ferb and SpongeBob, are still popular on television. The Lasseter-era hand-drawn films suffered from poor marketing more than anything else. This latest move by Disney just shows that they have no confidence in their creative product. Sad, very sad....I hope these talented artists find good jobs with another studio that will make good use of their skills.

Most hand drawn shows are actually made with the help if computers now. Phineas and Ferb is drawn with a stylus right on to the computer. Same with all the Fox shows. So are they getting rid of cell animation only? Or all "hand drawn"?
 

Magenta Panther

Well-Known Member
Actually, I didn't care for "Princess and the Frog" much; I think it's very weak. But that was due to story, not the animation. I bet if Disney would make another animal picture like Lion King in 2D, the box office would be huge.
 
I'm surprised to see some of those veterans get laid off, but this is part of this business. For animators (and other artists) who aren't more experienced they go through this every time a production on a movie ends. When another starts up or if they need help on another then they'll either be brought back or moved to that other work.

Being an animator means you only have a job until the one you are currently working on ends. Some animators get lucky and become demi-gods in the animation world and you very rarely see things like this happen to them (Andreas Deja, Glen Keane, Eric Goldberg and Mark Henn). Granted....even some of these guys have left to forge ahead on their own.

This same exact thing happened years ago shortly after "Home on the Range". Desks and equipment were sold, artists were shown the door and the animation division was torn apart with only the best surviving. It was shortly after this that I looked at Disney differently. I went to school to pursue a Disney animation career and things never quite worked out, but that first dismantling left a bad taste in my mouth. The movies had changed (which at the time I didn't have an issue with), but the stories had gotten so weak and the characters so unmemorable that it had only been a matter of time.

There is life after Disney for these guys. Many artists have banded together and have created smaller studios all over the Los Angeles/Anaheim/Pasadena area. I hope that they can all find a new home to continue making spectacular animation.

How sad.....yet again.
 

WDWGoof07

Well-Known Member
Most hand drawn animation shows no longer use cells they draw right into the computers now.

Most hand drawn shows are actually made with the help if computers now. Phineas and Ferb is drawn with a stylus right on to the computer. Same with all the Fox shows. So are they getting rid of cell animation only? Or all "hand drawn"?
I know that. Disney was one of the first animation studios to start using computers in traditional animation. They developed CAPS in conjunction with Pixar, and all of their hand-drawn films from 1990 onward (starting with The Rescuers Down Under) have used either CAPS or some other digital ink-and-paint system. So they haven't used physical cels in years, but it's still all drawn by hand. Every other step, prior to inking and painting, in the animation process is similar to what they did in the earliest Disney animated features. So, to answer your question, yes, it would appear that Disney is pretty much abandoning anything hand-drawn for theatrical features.
 
Most hand drawn shows are actually made with the help if computers now. Phineas and Ferb is drawn with a stylus right on to the computer. Same with all the Fox shows. So are they getting rid of cell animation only? Or all "hand drawn"?

Cel Animation has been mostly dead for quite some time. Most films are now done with a drawing pad and stylus and done straight into a computer as you mentioned. I would assume that this now means that all "hand drawn" animation is getting the axe. The animators listed were feature animation animators only though, so I'm assuming the extent of these layoffs will only encompass feature animation. Meaning.....3D features only from here on out.

Though it may also include some television people, the television based cartoons will continue to be created in whichever manner is most cost efficient for the production (whether it be 3D or 2D).
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
Wow. What a sad end to an era.

It doesn't matter how long the industry's been using computers. This is one of the most central things to Disney, since the beginning. It's sad to see it end this way regardless.
 

StarWarsGirl

Well-Known Member
This is news? Come on. They've been talking about this for years. Personally, I don't give a crap; I think that computer animation is cool and that Disney can make better computer animated movies than other companies COUGHdreamworksCOUGH. I think Tangled was better for having been in 3D. Times are changing. Let's move along.
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
This is news? Come on. They've been talking about this for years. Personally, I don't give a crap; I think that computer animation is cool and that Disney can make better computer animated movies than other companies COUGHdreamworksCOUGH. I think Tangled was better for having been in 3D. Times are changing. Let's move along.
And why we'll never see another Sistine Chapel. We'd all rather sit on our butts these days, creating and consuming.

Why hand carve something when you can just upload a model to a 3D printer, right? Ugh.

And I'm a computer person; have been for a long time!
 

StarWarsGirl

Well-Known Member
And why we'll never see another Sistine Chapel. We'd all rather sit on our butts these days, creating and consuming.

Why hand carve something when you can just upload a model to a 3D printer, right? Ugh.

And I'm a computer person; have been for a long time!
As someone who's never been good at art, a 3D printer really sounds nice...I can't draw to save my life.

Doesn't hand drawn animation involve sitting on your butt as well?
 

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