Guest Reportedly Seen Falling from Disney’s Contemporary Resort

JustAFan

Well-Known Member
So sad. I feel for family and loved ones that's left behind. In a way, I'm reminded of the family that lost a child in the lagoon last year. That trip back home must be the most painful thing in the world.
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
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The worst thing I can imagine is that the trip was a hope to lift the spirits, and it didn't seem to work.
It's hurting me to think this person made a last ditch attempt to brighten up their lives, and didn't succeed.

I have a sister that won't stop crying, and there's no way to fix it. Since my dad died in December, I can't ask her about the weather without her starting to cry. DisneyWorld can't fix that. It's something inside.

FWIW, I was in a full-on, zombie-in-my-own-life, can't-feel-a-thing depression for a full three years after my mother died. Nobody would have known it, because I became skilled at going through the motions and doing everything that was expected of me (laughing and joking all the way), but inside, I was totally dead. I didn't ask for help and I didn't share my self-destructive feelings with anyone because, truth be told, I didn't want anyone watching me too closely or trying to stop me. You don't want to know the horrible lies that depression whispers in your ear when you're in that dark place, but I believe I've had a glimpse of what that poor woman at the Contemporary might have been thinking, and my heart aches for her.

The thing that helped me the most, strangely enough, was the day I went to my doctor and asked for a referral to therapy, because even though it had been 3 years since my mother passed, I was still so depressed that I was barely functional. He said the words I most needed to hear: It's perfectly normal, and there's nothing "wrong" with you. He said that although he'd of course be happy to refer me to a therapist, he wanted me to understand that my feelings, however dark and terrible and devestating, were typical and even expected when someone loses a close family member, even years later, and sometimes forever. Hearing words like "normal" and "expected" helped me understand for the first time that I wasn't alone, and I wasn't broken -- I was just sad, and that was okay. That conversation was the first step on my road back. I'll never be the person I was before my mother died and I still mourn her every day, but I'm securely ensconced in a healthy place, mentally, spiritually and emotionally, and have been now for years.

I hope you'll be as patient as you can with your sister. She's not broken: she just needs time and space - and most of all, the reassurance that she will never have to pretend to be happy in order to be loved and valued.
 
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MagicInMe

New Member
So sad. I feel for family and loved ones that's left behind. In a way, I'm reminded of the family that lost a child in the lagoon last year. That trip back home must be the most painful thing in the world.
Similar thoughts here. Brings back many of those same thoughts and feelings.
 

MagicInMe

New Member
We were there two days before the event. We were in a taxi on the way home when I saw the article. We weren’t there when it happened, but it feels like we were. Someone mentioned earlier the deep symbolic and emotional ties that we might have with WDW. I think that goes not just for the place itself, but extends to the people we share experiences and emotions with. May be family, may be someone I’m standing in line with or a little one who sees Mickey for the first time. For those of us who love Disney, and have allowed it into the depths of our spirits, a tragedy like this has almost a collective consciousness of grief, disbelief, and empathy for all those directly and indirectly affected. In the words of one of the Illuminations songs, “We Are One.”
 

Tanna Eros

Well-Known Member
FWIW, I was in a full-on, zombie-in-my-own-life, can't-feel-a-thing depression for a full three years after my mother died. Nobody would have known it, because I became skilled at going through the motions and doing everything that was expected of me (laughing and joking all the way), but inside, I was totally dead. I didn't ask for help and I didn't share my self-destructive feelings with anyone because, truth be told, I didn't want anyone watching me too closely or trying to stop me. You don't want to know the horrible lies that depression whispers in your ear when you're in that dark place, but I believe I've had a glimpse of what that poor woman at the Contemporary might have been thinking, and my heart aches for her.

The thing that helped me the most, strangely enough, was the day I went to my doctor and asked for a referral to therapy, because even though it had been a full 3 years since my mother passed, I was still so depressed that I was barely functional. He said the words I most needed to hear: It's perfectly normal, and there's nothing "wrong" with you. He said that although he'd of course be happy to refer me to a therapist, he wanted me to understand that my feelings, however dark and terrible and devestating, were typical and even expected when someone loses a close family member, even years later, and sometimes forever. Hearing words like "normal" and "expected" helped me understand for the first time that I wasn't alone, and I wasn't broken -- I was just sad, and that was okay. That conversation was the first step on my road back. I'll never be the person I was before my mother died and I still mourn her every day, but I'm securely ensconced in a healthy place, mentally, spiritually and emotionally, and have been now for years.

I hope you'll be as patient as you can with your sister. She's not broken: she just needs time and space - and most of all, the reassurance that she will never have to pretend to be happy in order to be loved and valued.
Thank you for the advice. I'm afraid to even phone her, because whatever we talk about, she cries.
She was his daughter, I was his fishing buddy, so I can see where the relationships are different. I don't want her to laugh or smile if she doesn't want to; she shouldn't have to lie to me or anyone else.
You've helped me understand a lot. I don't cry because Dad was hurting pretty badly towards the end, so, to be honest, I was grateful when I heard he died.
You've helped more than you might think. Her whole world is turned inside out, I just lost a friend. I have good laughing memories, but they had a relationship where she could depend on him to be there. He was part of her day.
I feel kind of bad inviting her to cookie decorating parties, or to have family dinner, as if that would help pull her out of it. I guess she has to ride that tide to the shore.
 
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Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
I feel kind of bad inviting her to cookie decorating parties, or to have family dinner, as if that would help pull her out of it. I guess she has to ride that tide to the shore.

Please keep inviting her - not to fix her, because you're right that it can't - but just to be with her. Keep the Kleenex handy and let her grieve, and talk about your father, if and as she needs to - that way, she'll know she doesn't have to ride that tide alone. ❤
 

annabanana

New Member
The worst thing I can imagine is that the trip was a hope to lift the spirits, and it didn't seem to work.
It's hurting me to think this person made a last ditch attempt to brighten up their lives, and didn't succeed.

I have a sister that won't stop crying, and there's no way to fix it. Since my dad died in December, I can't ask her about the weather without her starting to cry. DisneyWorld can't fix that. It's something inside.
 

KBLovesDisney

Well-Known Member
The worst thing I can imagine is that the trip was a hope to lift the spirits, and it didn't seem to work.
It's hurting me to think this person made a last ditch attempt to brighten up their lives, and didn't succeed.

I have a sister that won't stop crying, and there's no way to fix it. Since my dad died in December, I can't ask her about the weather without her starting to cry. DisneyWorld can't fix that. It's something inside.
Let her cry, and be there for her. Don't stop inviting her to do things with you though. That may deepen her sadness. But that's just me.

And keep reminding her that it WILL be ok. (You don't know how much telling someone during a rough time that things will be ok really helps.)
 

Tanna Eros

Well-Known Member
Getting your sister some therapy will help her a lot.
She is afraid of the stigma, even though that mindset is outmoded and false. Her daughters have spoken to her about it, but she's afraid of being 'put away'. There is no reason for this fear.

Thank you all for the advice; it helps at least to have an idea of what to do.
 

spock8113

Active Member
"the reassurance that she will never have to pretend to be happy in order to be loved and valued." but this is the complete opposite of what Disney is, a huge front for happiness? Disney wants their employees to feel loved and valued because they "appear" happy.
The parks are full of this from Happy Cast members, to happy characters, to creating a falsely happy world where you are blocked from "unhappy" things like corridors, workshops, garbage dumpsters, sewage plants and anything real, clear up to the consistent illusion of happiness. That's why we all go, that's why we pay the money we normally wouldn't. We are perfectly normal for craving a stress-free easy and happy vacation. Just sayin'.
 

larryz

Today's Maytag Repairman
Premium Member
We are perfectly normal for craving a stress-free easy and happy vacation. Just sayin'.
A vacation you have to start planning 9 months to a year out, reserve your preferred dining times and seats 6 months out, reserve your preferred rides 3 months out, save for years (or pay for years afterward) to afford, and then worry about flights being on time, or traffic through Atlanta, random acts of tour groups, and now throw in a world-wide pandemic of a brand-new respiratory illness...

That's stress-free easy and happy?

Hint: No.
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
"the reassurance that she will never have to pretend to be happy in order to be loved and valued." but this is the complete opposite of what Disney is, a huge front for happiness? Disney wants their employees to feel loved and valued because they "appear" happy.
The parks are full of this from Happy Cast members, to happy characters, to creating a falsely happy world where you are blocked from "unhappy" things like corridors, workshops, garbage dumpsters, sewage plants and anything real, clear up to the consistent illusion of happiness. That's why we all go, that's why we pay the money we normally wouldn't. We are perfectly normal for craving a stress-free easy and happy vacation. Just sayin'.

I feel like maybe you missed the point of my post (and its intended audience).
 

Smooch

Well-Known Member
Why? Some people are so screwed up that it really isn't worth the energy. What does society gain?

I just want to say this attitude is incredibly disgusting. Some people might be "so screwed up" due to a chemical imbalance that could be treated with medicine if you work with a doctor. That person might not have had any sort of traumatic experience to cause their depression, their brain simply has an imbalance. Does that make them not worth the energy to work through their depression? That's like saying society should've just left me to die because my body doesn't naturally produce insulin (Type 1 Diabetic, an autoimmune disease, not caused by lifestyle choices like Type 2 Diabetes) and it's not worth the effort to calculate how much insulin I need over time to maintain a steady sugar, how much I need per the amount of carbs I eat, etc. My brother has been struggling with depression very recently, and still is, and he is on medications and is starting therapy soon. Is he not worth all that effort? Should me and my family just leave him to do whatever his depression makes him want to do? Should I just dump my girlfriend and move on because she has depression and it's not worth going through her dark times with her?

I mainly go on the DLR side of this site, so I don't know if you're a troll based on the previous comment about expecting dumb comments from you, but I just had to get this off my chest. I hope you never speak to a person going through depression like that, it's not fair to say someone isn't worth the energy and that society gains nothing. What if it was a close family member of yours? Would you say your mom or dad just isn't worth the energy and leave them to deal with their depression themselves and let them potentially do something tragic? I really hope this response illustrated what is wrong with your statement because even if one person makes a comment like yours to someone in a dark place, that could be the last straw. That isn't an exaggeration, if someone was incredibly depressed and having dark thoughts and came across a comment like yours that basically calls them worthless and that they contribute nothing to society, that could easily cause them to do something like take their own life. That's why I wanted to respond to your comment, so you realize how much harm you could possibly be doing by typing up one line on a forum.
 
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