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News Guardians of the Galaxy Cosmic Rewind attraction confirmed for Epcot

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I'm sure that picture of a huge room of coaster track with absolutely no platforms near it for theming was just a red herring from Disney to make us THINK this ride is just another coaster in a box. Now, perhaps with one corner having space projections on the walls.
That picture is rather old by now. Show sets are going to be one of the last things installed.
 

Hawg G

Well-Known Member
That picture is rather old by now. Show sets are going to be one of the last things installed.
But they wouldn't build platforms later. I've gotta assume the cutouts for RnRC were designed into the track. They wouldn't build a coaster, then build platforms and rooms a year later around the coaster. No new footers are being poured, so nothing substantial will be added to that picture.
 

trainplane3

Well-Known Member
Measured out the launch building and made some adjustments:
1636563901471.png


I initially severely underestimated the size of the UoE building. It's a bit more accurate now.
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
Yes, you doomsayers are all right: Disney is putting hundreds of millions of dollars into a "show coaster" with controlled-facing cars but then put in no show at all!!!

They doubled the cost of a "coaster in a box" for no reason at all!!!

They're featuring one of their most popular IPs by not having them appear in the coaster part of the ride!!

You are all just so, so clever!!!!


Hating must be a form of dementia.
 

Rich Brownn

Well-Known Member
This isn’t going to be like Crush’s Coaster where the gravity building is supposed to be black but you can see the corrugated metal panels on the walls and such right? Hopefully a level or two above Space Mountain and Crush’s Coaster?
Well, considering you can see the steel inside Expedition Everest..... (Still bugs me all that money and still couldn't seal it from outside light)
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
But they wouldn't build platforms later. I've gotta assume the cutouts for RnRC were designed into the track. They wouldn't build a coaster, then build platforms and rooms a year later around the coaster. No new footers are being poured, so nothing substantial will be added to that picture.
That is exactly what you would do. You build the coaster first because it is the most important thing that everything else has to avoid. They’ll even build the coaster before the exterior in a lot of cases (see TRON and Rock ‘n’ Rollercoaster). Show sets do not have to be installed on platforms, as they can be independent elements. A slab can be designed to supporting anchoring so their would be no need to install new footings.
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
That is exactly what you would do. You build the coaster first because it is the most important thing that everything else has to avoid. They’ll even build the coaster before the exterior in a lot of cases (see TRON and Rock ‘n’ Rollercoaster). Show sets do not have to be installed on platforms, as they can be independent elements. A slab can be designed to supporting anchoring so their would be no need to install new footings.
Are you saying the Yeti isn't attached to the EE coaster and that his vibrations isn't cracking the tracks and tearing up the cement the coaster is bolted to??!!??!
 

FerretAfros

Well-Known Member
Yes, you doomsayers are all right: Disney is putting hundreds of millions of dollars into a "show coaster" with controlled-facing cars but then put in no show at all!!!

They doubled the cost of a "coaster in a box" for no reason at all!!!

They're featuring one of their most popular IPs by not having them appear in the coaster part of the ride!!

You are all just so, so clever!!!!


Hating must be a form of dementia.
Disney has a long illustrious history of hyping up costly elements that either end up being cut before opening, or became significantly underutilized once their operational realities were fully understood. Off the top of my head, here are some examples from recent-ish years:
  • Telescoping tower in World of Color intended to be used for Zurg and Chernabog show elements, constructed and tested but never used for public performances
  • Hundreds of millions of dollars spent on the much-hyped Luigi's Flying Tires, which was closed within 3 years of opening due to lackluster performance, and was replaced with another forgettable B-ticket that also cost well over $100M to install
  • DAK's parkwide after-dark push, including Pandora's bioluminescent elements, the night safari, and Rivers of Light, which has all be rendered mostly obsolete by reverting to park hours that close shortly after sundown for the majority of the year, since most guests have already left the park anyway, as the park struggles to command a full day's attention 20+ years after opening with its limited attraction roster
  • Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge interactive elements that were one of the land's biggest selling points (and had gone through extensive playtesting in DL's Frontierland) were all cut prior to opening day
  • Expensive Mission:Space centrifuges permanently disabled when it became tragically apparent that the attraction as originally designed was too intense for average park guests
  • MK's New Fantasyland dragon, which had a massive viral marketing campaign, but only appeared one evening for a private press event
  • And, of course, the yeti in Expedition: Everest, which has been stationary since shortly after the ride opened
Of course this isn't to say that the coaster won't spin at all, or that its motions won't remain the same of years to come. However, Disney has a proven track record for spending huge sums of money on things that either never appear for paying guests, go out of commission shortly after opening without replacement, or are significantly scaled back. A quick walk through any Disney park will show countless items that were abandoned long ago, yet remain in place serving no particular purpose.

I don't doubt that the new coaster will have the controlled rotations on opening day. But it remains to be seen whether that element is necessary for the attraction to succeed, and if it will remain unchanged for years to come. As Disney has proven many times, just because it's expensive doesn't mean it's essential.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Disney has a long illustrious history of hyping up costly elements that either end up being cut before opening, or became significantly underutilized once their operational realities were fully understood. Off the top of my head, here are some examples from recent-ish years:
  • Telescoping tower in World of Color intended to be used for Zurg and Chernabog show elements, constructed and tested but never used for public performances
  • Hundreds of millions of dollars spent on the much-hyped Luigi's Flying Tires, which was closed within 3 years of opening due to lackluster performance, and was replaced with another forgettable B-ticket that also cost well over $100M to install
  • DAK's parkwide after-dark push, including Pandora's bioluminescent elements, the night safari, and Rivers of Light, which has all be rendered mostly obsolete by reverting to park hours that close shortly after sundown for the majority of the year, since most guests have already left the park anyway, as the park struggles to command a full day's attention 20+ years after opening with its limited attraction roster
  • Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge interactive elements that were one of the land's biggest selling points (and had gone through extensive playtesting in DL's Frontierland) were all cut prior to opening day
  • Expensive Mission:Space centrifuges permanently disabled when it became tragically apparent that the attraction as originally designed was too intense for average park guests
  • MK's New Fantasyland dragon, which had a massive viral marketing campaign, but only appeared one evening for a private press event
  • And, of course, the yeti in Expedition: Everest, which has been stationary since shortly after the ride opened
Of course this isn't to say that the coaster won't spin at all, or that its motions won't remain the same of years to come. However, Disney has a proven track record for spending huge sums of money on things that either never appear for paying guests, go out of commission shortly after opening without replacement, or are significantly scaled back. A quick walk through any Disney park will show countless items that were abandoned long ago, yet remain in place serving no particular purpose.

I don't doubt that the new coaster will have the controlled rotations on opening day. But it remains to be seen whether that element is necessary for the attraction to succeed, and if it will remain unchanged for years to come. As Disney has proven many times, just because it's expensive doesn't mean it's essential.
Speaking of coasters you forgot a big one: the custom designed swinging cars on Seven Dwarfs Mine Train that don’t swing nearly as much as originally envisioned, and really don’t swing all that much.

Disney also didn’t develop the rotating technology. I’m almost certain F.L.Y. came in well under $100 million.
 

Casper Gutman

Well-Known Member
Disney has a long illustrious history of hyping up costly elements that either end up being cut before opening, or became significantly underutilized once their operational realities were fully understood. Off the top of my head, here are some examples from recent-ish years:
  • Telescoping tower in World of Color intended to be used for Zurg and Chernabog show elements, constructed and tested but never used for public performances
  • Hundreds of millions of dollars spent on the much-hyped Luigi's Flying Tires, which was closed within 3 years of opening due to lackluster performance, and was replaced with another forgettable B-ticket that also cost well over $100M to install
  • DAK's parkwide after-dark push, including Pandora's bioluminescent elements, the night safari, and Rivers of Light, which has all be rendered mostly obsolete by reverting to park hours that close shortly after sundown for the majority of the year, since most guests have already left the park anyway, as the park struggles to command a full day's attention 20+ years after opening with its limited attraction roster
  • Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge interactive elements that were one of the land's biggest selling points (and had gone through extensive playtesting in DL's Frontierland) were all cut prior to opening day
  • Expensive Mission:Space centrifuges permanently disabled when it became tragically apparent that the attraction as originally designed was too intense for average park guests
  • MK's New Fantasyland dragon, which had a massive viral marketing campaign, but only appeared one evening for a private press event
  • And, of course, the yeti in Expedition: Everest, which has been stationary since shortly after the ride opened
Of course this isn't to say that the coaster won't spin at all, or that its motions won't remain the same of years to come. However, Disney has a proven track record for spending huge sums of money on things that either never appear for paying guests, go out of commission shortly after opening without replacement, or are significantly scaled back. A quick walk through any Disney park will show countless items that were abandoned long ago, yet remain in place serving no particular purpose.

I don't doubt that the new coaster will have the controlled rotations on opening day. But it remains to be seen whether that element is necessary for the attraction to succeed, and if it will remain unchanged for years to come. As Disney has proven many times, just because it's expensive doesn't mean it's essential.
Weren’t the Magic Bands supposed to be linked to all sorts of interactive features in the rides? If I remember correctly, the first of these was going to play out on the screens they installed in the final tunnel at Small World and then it simply… didn’t happen. Didn’t they also install some screens in the lobbies of the All-Star Resorts in anticipation of similar effects?

Anyway, Lazy and others have convinced me that we can’t conclude much about show scenes from these plans.
 

Jones14

Well-Known Member
Speaking of coasters you forgot a big one: the custom designed swinging cars on Seven Dwarfs Mine Train that don’t swing nearly as much as originally envisioned, and really don’t swing all that much.

Disney also didn’t develop the rotating technology. I’m almost certain F.L.Y. came in well under $100 million.
Swinging coasters are a neat concept that almost always results in terrible execution.

You need to hit lots of unbanked turns at a good speed to generate the forces necessary to get the cars swinging, but unbanked turns put more stress on the track and vehicles, so the “better” the ride gets, the more maintenance you’re piling onto your workload.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
Weren’t the Magic Bands supposed to be linked to all sorts of interactive features in the rides? If I remember correctly, the first of these was going to play out on the screens they installed in the final tunnel at Small World and then it simply… didn’t happen. Didn’t they also install some screens in the lobbies of the All-Star Resorts in anticipation of similar effects?

Anyway, Lazy and others have convinced me that we can’t conclude much about show scenes from these plans.

It happened; it's just not anything special. The screen says "Goodbye <your name>" at the end of the ride.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Weren’t the Magic Bands supposed to be linked to all sorts of interactive features in the rides? If I remember correctly, the first of these was going to play out on the screens they installed in the final tunnel at Small World and then it simply… didn’t happen. Didn’t they also install some screens in the lobbies of the All-Star Resorts in anticipation of similar effects?
Yep. They were also going to add a bunch of interactive queues like at The Haunted Mansion that tied into the MagicBand. There was also stuff like the custom doll that you would create online beforehand and then see in “it’s a small world”. There was also the creepier stuff like face / talking characters being given your name to greet you by name, or your server at a restaurant seeing what you just rode to ask how you liked the ride or tell you to have fun on your next FastPass+ selection.
 

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