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News Guardians of the Galaxy attraction confirmed for Epcot

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
It's a perfectly reasonable idea for the premise of the ride.
Then they should have made the ride where you act like you're getting on UoE (which is what Quill would have remembered) but then something goes wrong, and it winds up sucking your car into the roller-coaster portion where the rest of the Guardians have to join in on the fun to get you home safe.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
Then they should have made the ride where you act like you're getting on UoE (which is what Quill would have remembered) but then something goes wrong, and it winds up sucking your car into the roller-coaster portion where the rest of the Guardians have to join in on the fun to get you home safe.
That would have been a pretty cool idea.
Truth is, we really don't know how they are working the preshow of the coaster.
 

Imagineer777

Well-Known Member
I feel like we might be seeing a mix of both the "Peter visited EPCOT Center" & "GOTG need Energy" storylines for the ride. I also think that "Peter visited EPCOT Center" might come into play more than we might think since at D23 they went out of their way to mention it & show a picture, could've easily just been a passive reference in the preshow... 🤷‍♂️

I'm also really looking forward to finding out what/how they'll be naming the attraction, it'll be nice if they find a way to keep Universe of Energy in the style of Mission: Breakout's titling: "Guardians of the Galaxy: Universe of Energy!"
 

rioriz

Well-Known Member
That would have been a pretty cool idea.
Truth is, we really don't know how they are working the preshow of the coaster.
As the rarely seen master of Devils Advocate....i agree with @Incomudro

We dont know what the premise of the actual show scenes are. Maybe Mansion and Martin do but even though I have love for them we cant blindly follow their taste. Hate the location but dont hate the ride yet....

Mission Breakout is a far better experience than West Coast ToT could ever be....i said it and stand by it...now if they touch the original all bets are off!!!!!!!!!
 
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MrPromey

Well-Known Member
Depends on how it's presented. If it were done in a similar way to UoE and WoM, sure. But I was thinking more along the lines of the TT car building. Let it be engaging, using the IPs to make it more exciting to kids nowadays.
I think the problem behind "edutainment" is people's idea of it. Sure, the way it was presented 30+ years ago isn't working as well today. From an education perspective, with current attention spans and what kids (and adults, alike) have access to these days, I think it's role in keeping audiences/guests engaged is as relevant as it has ever been when it comes to learning.

As a person who regularly puts together presentations and learning materials (for adults in a corporate environment) I can tell you that I spend more time working on making what I'm producing compelling than I do on the actual source material I'm trying to present. In this day and age where everyone has one (or more) devices on them competing for attention, it's become more important than ever and that's not even taking into consideration what modern science tells us about the way people learn and retain information which for most of human history, was completely misunderstood.

That said, the thing about Epcot is that modern Disney has completely given up on the concept of what it was originally supposed to be. Edutainment hasn't failed in so much as Disney has decided that it's cheaper, easier, and more profitable to step away from just about every concept this park was founded on.

Just consider the gravity building. When Epcot first opened, experimental construction techniques were employed in many of the future world buildings. With only unique exceptions such as The Land** (where the size and scope of the structure were intentionally hidden to put more focus in the front on... well, land) the actual attraction spaces were housed in these unique structures that were meant to be seen and marveled at. There were no "go away" paint colors. These buildings weren't just facades hiding conventional warehouse structures the way rides of similar scope (POTC, HM, for instance) were handled in the past. Universe of energy lived up to its promise employing solar power cells into it's design which were intended to be a feature of the ascetic and not just a tack-on.

For various reasons, almost every optimistic and ambitious idea Disney originally had for this park has slowly been killed off. In terms of construction, GOTG isn't the first. Soarin ride buildings and Mission Space* which is a basic box on the back by a stylish front(both with a crazy-long exit due in part to their decision on the construction/hidden aspect) were early droppers of the original concept but GOTG obviously raises the bar with an even more obvious structure and an attraction that is (pardon the pun) entirely alien to the for-now theme of this part of the park.

As what was, for most of its life, the second most visited theme park in the World, Epcot never really failed in original execution. The problem is that management failed to maintain and expand it. The world changes and the what we are shown as fact along with how it is presented, needs to, too.

A lot changed in the world of energy over the time that the Ellen version of UOE ran and Disney couldn't even be pressed to update to reflect the fact that most people today don't even know the star of the attraction from the sitcom version of her shown there. What hope did we ever have that they were going to redo anything else about it to make it more relative not just to today's audience but also today's reality of energy?

Keeping up with developments in the world to continue to educate takes more effort than Disney, without a sponsor in the sector willing to foot the bill, is interested in outlaying.

So Epcot is changing. We'll have a permanent outdoor beer garden in place of an indoor (air conditioned) interactive area for learning. It'll be much cheaper to maintain and update and will make a lot more money than what was there before, I'm sure.

While Epcot continues to change, those of us who remember and love what it once was will continue to be unhappy. We will continue to complain about things like this attraction, not because we don't want to see it built (well, most of us, anyway) but because we are sad that it comes at the expense of something we know is never coming back.

For those of you who came along later and saw only the mess of neglect that resulted from Disney not showing an interest in upkeep, I know this probably doesn't make sense. To you, anything new and at least semi-well done feels like a huge win but Epcot was once something totally unique in concept and vision. For those who liked that, seeing it turned into this place that is basically a weird Magic Kingdom widely known for alcohol is... uncomfortable.

*That a large and genuinely unique structure was demolished to make room for the small warehouse box that replaced it was a disappointing loss - at least the UOE front is being kept in some form - even if it is just to act as the facade to hide the new show building, I guess.

**Edited to add, as someone pointed out that JII was largely housed in a boxy structure behind the pyramids. This perhaps seems less obvious and offensive because this was worked into the design of the park to better hide - a luxury they had starting from scratch that they don't really have with additions but just the same, it's closer to Haunted mansion and Pirates than not.
 
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Spash007

Well-Known Member
I think the problem behind "edutainment" is people's idea of it. Sure, the way it was presented 30+ years ago isn't working as well today. From an education perspective, with current attention spans and what kids (and adults, alike) have access to these days, I think it's role in keeping audiences/guests engaged is more important than ever when it comes to learning.

As a person who regularly puts together presentations and learning materials (for adults in a corporate environment) I can tell you that I spend more time working on making what I'm producing compelling than I do on the actual source material I'm trying to present. In this day and age where everyone has one (or more) devices on them competing for attention, it's become more important than ever and that's not even taking into consideration what modern science tells us about the way people learn and retain information which for most of human history, was completely misunderstood.

That said, the thing about Epcot is that modern Disney has completely given up on the concept of what it was originally supposed to be. Edutainment hasn't failed in so much as Disney has decided that it's cheaper, easier, and more profitable to step away from just about every concept this park was founded on.

Just consider the gravity building. When Epcot first opened, experimental construction techniques were employed in many of the future world buildings. With only unique exceptions such as The Land (where the size and scope of the structure were intentionally hidden to put more focus in the front on... well, land) the actual attraction spaces were housed in these unique structures that were meant to be seen and marveled at. There were no "go away" paint colors. These buildings weren't just facades hiding conventional warehouse structures the way rides of similar scope (POTC, HM, for instance) were handled in the past. Universe of energy lived up to its promise employing solar power cells into it's design which were intended to be a feature of the ascetic and not just a tack-on.

For various reasons, almost every optimistic and ambitious idea Disney originally had for this park has slowly been killed off. In terms of construction, GOTG isn't the first. Soarin ride buildings and Mission Space* which is a basic box on the back by a stylish front(both with a crazy-long exit due in part to their decision on the construction/hidden aspect) were early droppers of the original concept but GOTG obviously raises the bar with an even more obvious structure and an attraction that is (pardon the pun) entirely alien to the for-now theme of this part of the park.

As what was, for a long time, the second most visited theme park in the World, Epcot never really failed in original execution. The problem is that management failed to maintain and expand it. A lot changed in the world of energy over the time that the Ellen version of UOE ran and Disney couldn't even be pressed to update to reflect the fact that most people today don't even know the star of the attraction from the sitcom version of her shown there. Keeping up with developments in the world to continue to educate takes more effort than Disney, without a sponsor in the sector willing to foot the bill, is interested in outlaying.

So Epcot is changing. We will have a permanent beer garden in place of an interactive area for learning. It'll be much cheaper to maintain and update and will make a lot more money than what was there before, I'm sure.

While Epcot continues to changes, those of us who remember and love what it once was will continue to be unhappy and upset. We will continue to complain about things like this attraction, not because we don't want to see it built (well, most of us, anyway) but because we are sad that it comes at the expense of something we know is never coming back.

*That a large and genuinely unique structure was demolished to make room for the small warehouse box that replaced it was a dissapointing loss - at least the UOE front is being kept in some form - even if it is just to act as the facade to hide the new show building, I guess.
Dang, that hit the Epcot problem on the mark, much better than I've seen anyone verbalize it! When you fully realize how the opportunities were missed, and now that it's too late, it really is just sad. Don't mind me as I go for a liquid lunch...
 

Bender123

Well-Known Member
Just consider the gravity building. When Epcot first opened, experimental construction techniques were employed in many of the future world buildings. With only unique exceptions such as The Land (where the size and scope of the structure were intentionally hidden to put more focus in the front on... well, land) the actual attraction spaces were housed in these unique structures that were meant to be seen and marveled at. There were no "go away" paint colors. These buildings weren't just facades hiding conventional warehouse structures the way rides of similar scope (POTC, HM, for instance) were handled in the past. Universe of energy lived up to its promise employing solar power cells into it's design which were intended to be a feature of the ascetic and not just a tack-on.
That's true for some...They were designed to be "show ready" for the planned monorail expansion that would go behind them.

There are definitely warehouses at Epcot...JII is basically a warehouse behind the pyramids, Mexico is literally a façade with a warehouse, America is a warehouse and Japan is too. Land is unique in that the building, itself is a ride requirement as you have greenhouses...you cant hide the design when you need it clear.

Disney has always made things show ready, when needed and warehoused it for the areas that were never intended to be on stage. The problem with rides getting bigger is that this task becomes impossible to keep straight. Wither you hide it with paint, make it stand out like a sore thumb with no paint or theme it and make it stand out (ToT). Doing anything to the gravity building would instantly draw more attention to it than just slapping the go aways on it.

Or you don't build it there, which was my choice, but we have to live in the world we have.
 

FigmentJedi

Well-Known Member
"Peter visited Epcot as a kid" is only the first half of their backstory. Per the Guardians dance party storyline, the second half is that Quill decided to use those childhood memories to pitch Xandar on the idea of introducing Earth to Nova Corps by way of establishing a Xandar Pavilion at Epcot, but in Future World instead of World Showcase.
 

MrPromey

Well-Known Member
That's true for some...They were designed to be "show ready" for the planned monorail expansion that would go behind them.

There are definitely warehouses at Epcot...JII is basically a warehouse behind the pyramids, Mexico is literally a façade with a warehouse, America is a warehouse and Japan is too. Land is unique in that the building, itself is a ride requirement as you have greenhouses...you cant hide the design when you need it clear.

Disney has always made things show ready, when needed and warehoused it for the areas that were never intended to be on stage. The problem with rides getting bigger is that this task becomes impossible to keep straight. Wither you hide it with paint, make it stand out like a sore thumb with no paint or theme it and make it stand out (ToT). Doing anything to the gravity building would instantly draw more attention to it than just slapping the go aways on it.

Or you don't build it there, which was my choice, but we have to live in the world we have.
I'll give you that on Imagination but regarding the rest of your examples, they aren't a part of future world which is specifically what I referred to.

From a design perspective, making unique modern structures with new construction techniques to hold unique attractions that delved into ideas about the future felt a lot like buying into the same concepts they were trying to sell guests on.

I guess they could have tried to fit a boat ride into a Mayan themed pyramid or a theater into a traditional colonial structure but I'm not exactly sure what the point would have been.

Regarding your comments on the gravity building, I completely agree. I agree it went in the wrong place and I agree that them doing anything more would have drawn more attention to it. That's why, among other reasons, I'm optomistic for it as an added attraction to WDW but not happy about it being in Future World at Epcot.

They can hide large buildings or make them fit when they put them in the appropriate spot. Two examples of what could have been problems are RnRC and FOP... It looks like it may be the same with the new Star Wars attraction that we haven't yet seen... but of course, they were never going to spend FOP or GE money on the exterior of an attraction for Future World and the soundstage trick doens't work in a non-movie themed part.
 
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DanielBB8

Well-Known Member
lol, I just cringe at the idea that they literally gutted "classic Epcot" to make way for a new IP-infused attraction that would pay homage to "classic Epcot". They should have just updated UOE and put GOTG in RnRC.
I’m just Wow’d at yet another ridiculous comment about theming consistency at WDW parks. DHS on Sunset Boulevard has 1940s theming. RNRC with Aerosmith is inconsistent with the overall theme of this area and the park as a whole. Replacing Aerosmith with Guardians is so theming inconsistent that I wonder if you’re having what Steve Tyler is. At DCA, the whole point of Guardians in ToT is a theming change. They will turn Sunset Boulevard into Superheroes Land if they ever decide to add Marvel into DHS.

Try to understand what you’re saying.
 
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