General political chat

draybook

Well-Known Member
Since someone requested a layout of where the "protesters" were, where the armed couple was and where the entry gate is located...

gate1.jpg

Definitely lends credence to the claims by the couple that the mob stormed and wrecked the entry gate to gain access. That private gate/shack is the one shown in the picture I had posted earlier.
 

TheDisneyDaysOfOurLives

Well-Known Member
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Melatonin-deficient?!? SERIOUSLY?!?

I'm glad the article was at least clear (although it should have been earlier than where it appears in the article) that it WAS indeed private property and that a gate was broken in order for the "peaceful protesters" to gain entry where they didn't belong.
You should check out his bio.

 

DoubleJ21

Well-Known Member
What would be really nice is to also see the rage and protests directed at the people routinely killing kids and young adults every single week in Chicago alone...but I’m not holding out hope.
It seems pretty disrespectful just to throw out some bull- talking point when all you need to do is be honest and say, I'm rather done with these protests or I don't support these protests.
It is, in my view, an indictment of hypocrisy. We ask, given the gaping disparity in the scale of police brutality versus civilian homicide in the black community, where are the organizers marching against this appalling tragedy? I would love to see it. I wish I had the personality to organize a march because I know would be moved to tears. If one really wants to lift the black community up to a level of unparalleled greatness, you must address the crime which stifles development and opportunity. You must address the schools which are failing to educate black American youth and provide them with the human capital to succeed in the world today. You must address the black family and social ills brought about by a devastating redneck culture, aided by poorly conceived social programs.

What does “black lives matter” mean to me? It‘s not just a protest chant against police brutality, it’s not a virtue signal of support for left-leaning politics. It means that the lives of black Americans are just as valuable as every other human life. It‘s a call to action to address the issues holding black Americans back from prosperity and health. We must address the causes of suffering.

I must.
 
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hopemax

Well-Known Member
Russia Bounty story...

Now we're to reports that John Bolton briefed the President in March 2019, a written brief prior. The early 2020 briefing makes a total of 3 briefs.


Reminder of the timeline, an invitation for Taliban leaders to come to Camp David was for September 2019.

I have my ideas of cautionary prudence. Even if unconfirmed, what kind of message does that send? To Russia? To our military who submitted the intelligence? Neither of these invites needed to be given, especially with this sort of intelligence pending. Either the President knew and he offered. Or his subordinates knew and didn't address concerns with the President. Or didn't have concerns. Why extend these hands of invitation? Is this what we do now?
 

hopemax

Well-Known Member
You must address the schools which are failing to educate black American youth and provide them with the human capital to succeed in the world today.
One of the more shocking, "I knew things weren't good, but I didn't know THAT" things I've read while trying to learn more was how many 4-year high schools served black young people in 1933. South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana had a COMBINED total of 16 schools. Not 16 per state, 16 for 4 states. 1933 not 1873.
 

DoubleJ21

Well-Known Member
One of the more shocking, "I knew things weren't good, but I didn't know THAT" things I've read while trying to learn more was how many 4-year high schools served black young people in 1933. South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana had a COMBINED total of 16 schools. Not 16 per state, 16 for 4 states. 1933 not 1873.
People often forget or don’t know how underdeveloped education was even in the early 1900s. To some extent, the stat you quote is not just indicative of the rampant discrimination found in the South during this time period, but also the underdevelopment of education, especially in the South.

To a large extent, this is the product of a culture widespread in the South during that time that didn’t value education in the slightest.
 

DoubleJ21

Well-Known Member
Blacks rob blacks. Latinos rob Latinos. Asians rob Asians. Whites rob whites, and on and on and on. But we only hear about one, making it seem as if the community itself is not concerned about crime, and nothing could be further from the truth.
This is true, but in the black American community, homicide is occurring at a rate that is unfathomable. It is despicably inhumane for this problem to be derided as “misdirection“ as the author has so callously done.

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But the real flaw in this argument is the simple fact that when a black person commits a crime against another black person, or a white person against another whiter person, and so forth, that person faces justice --something that happens less than 1 percent of the time when the perpetrator is a cop.
Highlighting the issue of crime in the black community isn’t meant to disperse denunciations of police brutality, or calls for police reform. The intent is to bring justice to black communities needlessly suffering at the hands of a relatively small number of violent criminals. Rectifying this problem is sure to bring about a great deal more prosperity to black Americans compared to the less potent and pervasive, but still very important issue of police brutality.

I must also correct the author‘s claim that victims of black on black crime or white on white crime face justice. In many cases of crime, the victim doesn’t receive justice. For example, in Chicago over a decade long period, 74% of homicides didn’t result in an arrest, let alone a conviction. And that’s homicide, the most thoroughly investigated type of crime.

 
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Lilofan

Well-Known Member
This is true, but in the black American community, homicide is occurring at a rate that is unfathomable. It is despicably inhumane for this problem to be derided as “misdirection“ as the author has so callously done.

View attachment 480451


Highlighting the issue of crime in the black community isn’t meant to disperse denunciations of police brutality, or calls for police reform. The intent is to bring justice to black communities needlessly suffering at the hands of a relatively small number of violent criminals. Rectifying this problem is sure to bring about a great deal more prosperity to black Americans compared to the less potent and pervasive, but still very important issue of police brutality.

I must also correct the author‘s claim that victims of black on black crime or white on white crime face justice. In many cases of crime, the victim doesn’t receive justice. For example, in Chicago over a decade long period, 74% of homicides didn’t result in an arrest, let alone a conviction. And that’s homicide, the most thoroughly investigated type of crime.

Singapore with the lowest crime rates is not surprising since they are one of top countries for executions and hangings.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
I agree with him, so you can count me as despicably inhumane also.
its gaslighting to discredit and distract from the actual issue at hand which was police brutality....
But don't you think that if we really want to improve life and opportunity for minority and low-income communities, that it is a piece that needs to be dealt with? This is a sincere question, as I really feel that there is more that needs to be addressed than police brutality alone.
 

Quinnmac000

Well-Known Member
I'm doing the same thing I'm doing for the violence here in Memphis...nothing.

And I hardly bring up Chicago(not saying you're naming me) but when I do it's to point out hypocrisy in how we minorities get so riled up when the "white devils" are involved but clam up when we're out here killing ourselves at roughly a rate of 30 times what police do.
We know its an issue but people use it to change the topic and discredit a previously made argument.

It would be like someone post about the death of children in Chicago and then I bring up the Kentucky and Indiana have the highest rate of child abuse in the states.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
But don't you think that if we really want to improve life and opportunity for minority and low-income communities, that it is a piece that needs to be dealt with? This is a sincere question, as I really feel that there is more that needs to be addressed than police brutality alone.
Of course it needs to be dealt with, but it isn’t the issue at hand. It’s like people responding to the COVID-19 crisis by bringing up the flu, car accidents, etc. It’s a diversionary tactic.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
We know its an issue but people use it to change the topic and discredit a previously made argument.

It would be like someone post about the death of children in Chicago and then I bring up the Kentucky and Indiana have the highest rate of child abuse in the states.
Similar to the Trump Hannity town hall recently. Hannity was too nice to Trump and did not press his idol with hard questions. When Hannity asked Trump what his plan is for the next four years, he couldn't really answer the question and then deflected to talking about Bolton. It won't be long now until his staff starts packing his things at the WH.
 

Quinnmac000

Well-Known Member
But don't you think that if we really want to improve life and opportunity for minority and low-income communities, that it is a piece that needs to be dealt with? This is a sincere question, as I really feel that there is more that needs to be addressed than police brutality alone.
I just want to point out Chicago isn't even the top ten most dangerous cities in America on multiple different lists. So it feels the argument is disingenuous.
safewise.com/blog/most-dangerous-cities/
security.org/resources/most-dangerous-cities/
Additionally, black on black crime is just crime in prevalant black communities. Thats like labeling all crime in 99% white countries white on white crime. Its expected.

Its a factor but does not address the realities of what is going on today which is heavily caused from racial disparities in the justice system.
 
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DoubleJ21

Well-Known Member
I agree with him, so you can count me as despicably inhumane also.
I guess so. Sadly.

Nothing to see here but “misdirection,” folks.
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Of course it needs to be dealt with, but it isn’t the issue at hand.
Only if you look through a narrowly constructed lens. The wider issue is barriers to prosperity and health in the black community.
 
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Quinnmac000

Well-Known Member
Only if you look through a narrowly constructed lens. The wider issue is barriers to prosperity and health in the black community.
And what are you doing to help?

When I lived in Illinois, I went to those communities such as East Saint Louis, lead clean up drives, tutored people, volunteered my time. All I hear is a bunch of people's mouths moving and no actions.
 
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