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General political chat

Quinnmac000

Well-Known Member
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/08/singapore-overtakes-us-to-become-most-competitive-country-wef-says.html

Singapore has overtaken the U.S. to become the most competitive nation in the world, according to the World Economic Forum (WEF).

In its 2019 Global Competitiveness Report, the WEF measured the strength of 103 key indicators, such as inflation, digital skills and trade tariffs, across 141 countries.

The key indicators in the report were organized into 12 pillars, which included institutions, macroeconomic stability and health.

The U.S., which held the top spot in 2018′s ranking, dropped into second place this year, although the report’s authors noted that it “remains an innovation powerhouse.”

America received the highest score in the world in several subcategories, including ease of finding skilled employees and venture capital availability, with the U.S. also being ranked higher than any other country in the business dynamism pillar.

However, the country scored relatively low in some categories, with increasing trade tariffs, declining life expectancy and low digital skills among the American population taking a toll on the United States’ overall ranking. The WEF noted that life expectancy in the U.S. is now lower than it is in China, with the U.S. having only the 39th highest life expectancy in the world amid its ongoing opioid crisis.

The 10 most competitive countries in the world

  1. ingapore
  2. United States
  3. Hong Kong
  4. Netherlands
  5. Switzerland
  6. Japan
  7. Germany
  8. Sweden
  9. United Kingdom
  10. Denmark
Overall, Asia-Pacific was named the most competitive region in the world, followed by Europe and North America.

The report, published Tuesday, warned that most economies were locked in a cycle of low or flat productivity growth. According to its authors, nations that have invested in four key areas — human capital, improving their institutions, innovation and “business dynamism” — would be best placed to withstand a global slowdown and revive domestic productivity. However, they warned the effects of a slowdown were likely to be exacerbated by simmering geopolitical tensions.
 

Willmark

Well-Known Member
I'm happy that a company is doing so well that they can destroy 5million worth of product. That's putting your money where your mouth is - and I'm not being sarcastic.
Yep capitalism at its finest.

It’s also why I haven’t shopped there for years. They have nothing I need or want that I can’t get elsewhere.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
Yep capitalism at its finest.

It’s also why I haven’t shopped there for years. They have nothing I need or want that I can’t get elsewhere.
total side note- Although I am a frequent Dicks shopper, monthly in the very least.. sometimes weekly or more...
There’s a huge annual Adidas tent sale this weekend in the area.. I’ve never gone because the lines look breakdown inducing.. BUT, I am going to go this year, my kid’s coach said that it’s possible to get enough gear and clothing for the year.. at about 70% off. My kid only wears Nike soccer shoes, but that’s about to change.lol
You should check to see if it’s comes to your area!
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
I'm happy that a company is doing so well that they can destroy 5million worth of product. That's putting your money where your mouth is - and I'm not being sarcastic.
Same. I may well stop in there today and buy something. Never been in one before, but I know where it is.

That is an example of a company putting doing the right thing above the bottom line.
In the funeral home case, just having a religious belief against transgendered people should not be enough to fire them. However, if they can prove that this employee is making them lose business because of customers' refusing to use them due to this employee, they may have a case.

So it's almost the opposite of the cake issue, or your examples. The funeral home is not refusing service to anyone.
If so, this is a case of a company putting the bottom line above doing the right thing.

Granted, there's a huge difference between a giant sporting goods chain whose name I can't type here (LOL) vs. (I presume) a mom & pop funeral home(?) and what each can absorb. I know I can't have more than a few bad months in a row in my business, or I take on debt. That can easily compound to the point of insolvency over several months.

From USA today:

"The owner of Harris Funeral Homes, Tom Rost, explained in a videotaped interview with his lawyers that he was concerned about how the families of the deceased would react to Stephens who was, in Rost's words, "the face of the Harris Funeral Home."
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
Same. I may well stop in there today and buy something. Never been in one before, but I know where it is.

That is an example of a company putting doing the right thing above the bottom line.


If so, this is a case of a company putting the bottom line above doing the right thing.

Granted, there's a huge difference between a giant sporting goods chain whose name I can't type here (LOL) vs. (I presume) a mom & pop funeral home(?) and what each can absorb. I know I can't have more than a few bad months in a row in my business, or I take on debt. That can easily compound to the point of insolvency over several months.

From USA today:

"The owner of Harris Funeral Homes, Tom Rost, explained in a videotaped interview with his lawyers that he was concerned about how the families of the deceased would react to Stephens who was, in Rost's words, "the face of the Harris Funeral Home."
I gave this more thought while doing a mindless task (making the bed and scrubbing the tub, etc) and amended my earlier post.
 

Grimley1968

Well-Known Member
For the record, I am opposed to arbitrary, rather than conditions-based, troop withdrawals from anywhere the US has troops. I don't like it any better when Trump orders it than when Obama removed troops from Iraq on an arbitrary schedule rather than a conditions based gradual withdrawal, with disastrous results, or when GW Bush "declared" the Iraq War over, leading to the necessity of The Surge to pacify Iraq. It would have been better not to have been in some of these places in the first place, but since we made the commitments, I think we should see them through, even if it means sometimes keeping troops in places for decades, gradually drawing down once benchmarks have been met. We just need to be more cautious as a nation in the future in committing ourselves to keeping peace in parts of the world that are IMO not our responsibility, when literally no other nation steps in like the US.
 

willtravel

Well-Known Member
The Kurds are going to suffer badly once the Turkish army moves in. After all they did to fight ISIS, they deserve the international community’s support and protection. And they’re not the only ones who are going to pay the price: an ISIS resurgence would have devastating consequences for the region and for the world at large.
Who is in the international community support for the Kurds beside the US? Just wondering. Not coming up with anything unless my search question is not correct. Is NATO there?

This fighting has gone on for how long in that region? It will never end no matter what protection there is.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
9/11 was an absolute tragedy and justice needed to be met. But... wasn’t it due to mistakes the US made that resulted in the situation we are now in with the Middle East? The rise or ISIS etc?
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Who is in the international community support for the Kurds beside the US? Just wondering. Not coming up with anything unless my search question is not correct. Is NATO there?

This fighting has gone on for how long in that region? It will never end no matter what protection there is.
I wrote “international community” for a reason. The responsibility should not fall on the US alone. The entire world owes the Kurds for their inestimable role in fighting ISIS.

By the same token, the whole world—and not just the region—stands to suffer if the Kurds are attacked, because ISIS may well rebound in the ensuing chaos.
 

Grimley1968

Well-Known Member
Who is in the international community support for the Kurds beside the US? Just wondering. Not coming up with anything unless my search question is not correct. Is NATO there?

This fighting has gone on for how long in that region? It will never end no matter what protection there is.
Certainly no other nation besides the US has literally fought a war and maintained so many troops in the region for years, at least in part, to protect the Kurds in Iraq.
 
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