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General political chat

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
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I don't get what's so funny. Perhaps Ireland is too distant for some of you to understand the implications of what's happening. I still remember IRA bombs going off in London when I was a child and watching harrowing news stories about deadly sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. The Troubles (as this violence is known) came to an end as recently as 1998 with the Good Friday Agreement, and there are still dissident extremists active to this day. Nothing can be allowed to put the peace process at risk by exacerbating communal tensions, as imposing border checks between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland would inevitably do. There is absolutely nothing to laugh at here.
 

Jim S

Well-Known Member
I don't get what's so funny. Perhaps Ireland is too distant for some of you to understand the implications of what's happening. I still remember IRA bombs going off in London when I was a child and watching harrowing news stories about deadly sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. The Troubles (as this violence is known) came to an end as recently as 1998 with the Good Friday Agreement, and there are still dissident extremists active to this day. Nothing can be allowed to put the peace process at risk by exacerbating communal tensions, as imposing border checks between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland would inevitably do. There is absolutely nothing to laugh at here.

Your sky is falling narrative since day one is rather close minded on your part. These problems in Ireland will also be solved as will all other problems once the break has been made. CERTAINTY will take over and rule the day once they are free of the EU. You need more faith in your fellow man.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Your sky is falling narrative since day one is rather close minded on your part. These problems in Ireland will also be solved as will all other problems once the break has been made. CERTAINTY will take over and rule the day once they are free of the EU. You need more faith in your fellow man.
It's not my narrative, Jim. It's what the majority of Irish people themselves are saying. That should give you pause for thought.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
That's easy for you to say. Peace on Ireland is at stake. Jobs and national prosperity are at stake. Leaving the EU is a difficult business and must be done properly, which means with a sensible deal. May's agreement already provides us with a blueprint for such an eventuality.
I get what your saying... but so far it just seems like endless delaying, with no actual plans to leave. It's frustrating, and exhausting.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
I get what your saying... but so far it just seems like endless delaying, with no actual plans to leave. It's frustrating, and exhausting.
This is simply not true. A Brexit deal was negotiated back in December, though subsequently rejected by MPs. A version of it can and should be resurrected. Leaving immediately without a deal may seem an easy way out, but it’ll just pave the way for a whole new set of frustrations, with the UK having to negotiate its relationship with the EU from scratch (and with even less bargaining power than now).
 
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Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
Many kids for whatever reason do not attend college. It is totally unfair for them to have to pay for the loans of those that did attend college and just as unfair for those that worked their tail off to pay off their student loans. In other situations parents made tremendous sacrifices to send their kids to college while keeping the loans to a minimum.

It is a system that was abused my many students and I saw it first hand. It was troubling and infuriating. What bothers me the colleges have no skin in the game and it is high time they were held to account for loading these students up with insane amounts of debt while suffering no consequences.

Colleges often load up the grants and loans the first year of matriculation and in the succeeding years some of those grants and loans disappear yet tuition rises virtually every year. Rising cost of college is a whole different subject.
The rising cost is all these loans being given out, it's like a blank check for colleges.
I absolutely agree with you. Honestly, if student loans were like trying to get a business loan it would be so different. If you didn't prove yourself a good student in high school, go to community college and show it there. I am all for keeping CCs tuition rates low. They offer a great educational for kids to get their requisites out of the way before transferring, and many of the professors appreciate the students that put in a real effort and don't treat it like the 13th grade.
 
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Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
This is simply not true. A Brexit deal was negotiated back in December, though subsequently rejected by MPs. A version of it can and should be resurrected. Leaving immediately without a deal may seem an easy way out, but it’ll just pave the way for a whole new set of frustrations, with the UK having to negotiate its relationship with the EU from scratch (and with even less bargaining power than now).
I guess what I mean by that is that parliament seems to be in disarray, no one can agree... and a deal, which is likely the only deal the UK will get with little changes to come... has been passed over several times, a PM lost her job because of it... and in the end I would assume her deal will be the one that gets through.
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
Which is what the piece I shared is advocating anyway.
I did add the committed part. It seems.that a significant fraction of politicians are not committed to leaving the EU

It seems.that instead of.an amicable divorce some just want to split bank accounts yet live in the same house, sleep in the same bed, etc.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
I guess what I mean by that is that parliament seems to be in disarray, no one can agree... and a deal, which is likely the only deal the UK will get with little changes to come... has been passed over several times, a PM lost her job because of it... and in the end I would assume her deal will be the one that gets through.
A lot has changed since January. A repackaged version of May's deal might just make it now that we're running out of options. There's reliable speculation that Johnson himself is revisiting it.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
I did add the committed part. It seems.that a significant fraction of politicians are not committed to leaving the EU
But not those in the the MPs for a Deal group. I shared Kinnock's piece in the hope that we might discuss his and his colleagues' specific strategy (which is committed to leaving) rather than rehash the larger Brexit debate.
 
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DoubleJ21

Well-Known Member
Good night for the GOP. We won both elections.
The anti fossil fuel position of virtually every Democrat is going to be hard to defend in Pennsylvania (natural gas), Michigan (automobiles), and Ohio (natural gas). All key battleground states.

Many union members that usually vote Democrat are likely to turn when the Democratic candidate says they want to destroy their line of work, or institute enormous changes that are sure to cost many, many jobs.
 

Ag11gani

Well-Known Member
Leave on the 31st of October, give certainty to the nation and the markets, and put the country on the road to success and greater prosperity.
No deal provides no certainty for anybody and the 9% decrease in GDP, decrease in immigration, increase in crime and violence in Ireland are all synonymous with success.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
The anti fossil fuel position of virtually every Democrat is going to be hard to defend in Pennsylvania (natural gas), Michigan (automobiles), and Ohio (natural gas). All key battleground states.

Many union members that usually vote Democrat are likely to turn when the Democratic candidate says they want to destroy their line of work, or institute enormous changes that are sure to cost many, many jobs.
Well, in PA,, where I know people who have pipelines near their house, the natural gas provides no increased tax revenue to the state, and what people do see are giant tracts of land dug up in their backyards for pipline work(that many oppose), so I would say in that state, there are plenty of folks that are not fans of it. Even much of the work done at the drilling sites is done by people brought from out of state.
Now all that said, after watching Chernobyl on HBO :hungover:, I am ok with fossil fuels, but mined and processed as cleanly as possible.
 

EricsBiscuit

Well-Known Member
No deal provides no certainty for anybody and the 9% decrease in GDP, decrease in immigration, increase in crime and violence in Ireland are all synonymous with success.
Nope. It means the UK can cut tariffs by negotiating free trade deals and can use the WTO rules to keep things normal until those free trade deals are reached.
 
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