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General political chat

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
Enjoy life in America Jr. then. 👍



I will admit that I have concerns as to the maturity of our 18 yr olds now, vs the time when the statutory age for many things was established. For a number of reasons, I see value in reconsidering that.
More like England Jr. in a way ;) More alike with the Europeans then with America in a lot of ways (governmental/law based), culturally more aligned with America.
 

draybook

Well-Known Member
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The Vegas shooter got off over 1,000 rounds. Did he target, shoot, target, shoot all those one at a time?
*edited to correct number

He used a bump stock, which skews accuracy but it's hard not to hit as many targets as he did when firing into a large crowd like that.

Also, you don't "fire them all at one time". There's magazine size, multiple weapons used, etc. Using an extremely rare event to justify the removal of rights for the populace is reaching.
 

Grimley1968

Well-Known Member
and then there was the other young kid who bought all those weapons for the El Paso shooter... time to see it less as a right and more as a privilege me thinks.
The bolded is not going to happen. No one is revoking the 2nd Amendment to the US Constitution. There are things we can do to regulate access to guns by those who have forfeited their freedoms or have demonstrated an inability to responsibly enjoy their rights, but changing a right to a privilege (like, say, obtaining a pilot's license) is a non starter.
 

draybook

Well-Known Member
Again, I think guns need to start being seen as a privilege. An 18 year old has certainly not earned the privilege to own 25 guns and 10,000 rounds. Yeesh.

Luckily for us, the Constitution overrides your opinion. Didn't you guys just have a couple of teens on the loose after killing multiple people? Didn't one of their fathers commend them for dodging the police? Didn't one of them have Nazi paraphernalia and stuff found at his house? Glass houses, my friend.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
The bolded is not going to happen. No one is revoking the 2nd Amendment to the US Constitution. There are things we can do to regulate access to guns by those who have forfeited their freedoms or have demonstrated an inability to responsibly enjoy their rights, but changing a right to a privilege (like, say, obtaining a pilot's license) is a non starter.
I’m speaking more of in a regulation / way of thought stand point. Not altering your constitution. But seeing something as a privelge can sometimes strengthen the weight or gravity of the subject.
 

Gitson Shiggles

There was me, that is Mickey, and my three droogs
I’m speaking more of in a regulation / way of thought stand point. Not altering your constitution. But seeing something as a privelge can sometimes strengthen the weight or gravity of the subject.
There’s no compromise here. The first ten amendments are called the “Bill of Rights” and not the “Bill of Privileges.” No disrespect meant, but I’m not surprised the lack of fundamental understanding on this. That’s what years of education in the U.S. will (and should) teach a person.
 

OneofThree

Well-Known Member
I’m speaking more of in a regulation / way of thought stand point. Not altering your constitution. But seeing something as a privelge can sometimes strengthen the weight or gravity of the subject.

In the US, rights are inherent, while privileges are granted. As a people, we have agreed that some individuals forfeit said rights -based on their own choices. Any conversation must necessarily take place within this context.
 
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Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
There’s no compromise here. The first ten amendments are called the “Bill of Rights” and not the “Bill of Privileges.” No disrespect meant, but I’m not surprised the lack of fundamental understanding on this. That’s what years of education in the U.S. will (and should) teach a person.
In the US, rights are inherent, while privileges are granted. As a people, we have agreed that some individuals forfeit said rights -based on their own choices. Any conversation must necessarily take place within this context.
So here's a Canadian question for American's... should the Bill of Rights be adjusted as time goes on and the future changes? Is there no room for slight adjustment anywhere? Is it set in stone, the values from way back when? Just curious, I am not advocating changing your countries values, but it also seems strange to not be willing to rewrite or adjust things as time goes on.
 

HoldenC

Well-Known Member
I corrected the typo, but still...
How many lawful Americans right now in their home have enough weapons and fire power that if they wished could instantly become a one-man militia? No planning needed, no restrictions, just one bad day and something in their brain snaps.
And what happens when an entire group of well armed Americans forms a 21st Century Militia because they’ve decided they’ve had enough (of what, I’m not sure, let’s say women in Star Wars)?
That is some great fan-fiction buddy 🤯
 

OneofThree

Well-Known Member
So here's a Canadian question for American's... should the Bill of Rights be adjusted as time goes on and the future changes? Is there no room for slight adjustment anywhere? Is it set in stone, the values from way back when? Just curious, I am not advocating changing your countries values, but it also seems strange to not be willing to rewrite or adjust things as time goes on.
One of the most interesting things, from a historical perspective, is that the Bill of Rights almost didn't make it into the final draft of the constitution. This was hotly deliberated. Although all of the founders agreed that rights did not emanate from government or the document itself, the differed as to the function of enumeration. Those who opposed inclusion never wanted this notion misconstrued. Those in favor felt the inclusion would function to enlist gov't in securing the rights enumerated. In either case however, they never viewed the list as exhaustive. Likewise, it is beyond the purview of the document to establish, abolish, or "retool" rights in a manner consistent with your suggestion.
 

BuddyThomas

Well-Known Member
Still respected among the world, to those who think that matters.
Stupid international relations experts, stupid American public, and stupid pesky facts:

“International relations experts and U.S. public agree: America is less respected globally”

 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
So let me get this straight. Hong Kong is about to face down the largest army in the world. A pedo committed suicide while on suicide watch with no camera recording, and a "replacement" guard on duty just a short time after his cellmate was removed from his cell. And Russia nuked itself.

But Fredo Cuomo steals the spotlight? Go figure.
 

Gitson Shiggles

There was me, that is Mickey, and my three droogs
So here's a Canadian question for American's... should the Bill of Rights be adjusted as time goes on and the future changes? Is there no room for slight adjustment anywhere? Is it set in stone, the values from way back when? Just curious, I am not advocating changing your countries values, but it also seems strange to not be willing to rewrite or adjust things as time goes on.
It’s a matter of opinion if the Constitution should be adjusted. There’s a process laid out to make amendments to the Constitution that require more than a mere change in thinking. That process is intentionally devised so any adjustment cannot be made easily.
 

BuddyThomas

Well-Known Member
To even ask that suggests a serious misunderstanding of the foundations that hold this amazing nation together. The Bill of Rights will never be amended, no matter how desperately liberals moan about it being "out of date"
Are you aware that the Bill of Rights has already been amended multiple times?
 
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