First California theme park set to reopen — without rides

PiratesMansion

Well-Known Member
I was there on new year eve and they had no rides. That place make Magic Mountain look like Disneyland.

I've never been, but didn't it used to be relatively well-regarded for a Six Flags park?

Reports over the past couple of years have made it sound like it's just taken a huge nosedive.
 

Phroobar

Well-Known Member
Well the animals were interesting but no where near the world class matching zoos like Los Angeles or San Diego. In fact, I think Santa Ana's little zoo was better. The coasters at the front of the park made it look like a temporary carnival.
 

DrAlice

Well-Known Member
Little by little, the animals seem to be disappearing. That may or may not be related to the hoard of animal rights protesters that are in front of the park every time we visit.

The "temporary carnival" problem comes from the fact that rides were slapped over the former front parking lot. I mean, you can STILL see the striping on the pavement in some areas! Also, since they chose to add to that area, they effectively blocked off their "front door" to guests. Now you have to walk all the way from the former overflow parking lot at the back of the property, and around a weird corner just to get to the front of the park.

There is SO MUCH potential in this location with the lagoon, but there is just no one (apparently) willing to think creatively as they develop it.

Having said all that.... we still have fun when we go. :)

Finally, I'll add that as a passholder, it's weird that I'm learning about their re-opening plans from a Disney fan forum. I've received ZERO communication from Six Flags since the pandemic began.

P.S. Redwood City location: didn't they have water slides??? Or am I confusing my childhood memories?
 

Curious Constance

Well-Known Member
Again, I'll repeat what I said in another thread....

The idea that "Museums, zoos, aquariums can open, but theme parks can't" seems so arbitrary to me. I think this Six Flags maneuver really underscores how silly of a distinction this is.
The only thing I can think of is most zoos don’t have rides so less shared touch points?
 

Curious Constance

Well-Known Member
Didn't the CDC say Covid couldn't spread through surfaces?

I don't understand why Amusement/Theme parks are special. I have to imagine you'd be less likely to be exposed at an amusement park than at almost-always-completely-indoors aquariums.
Couldn’t? Or less likely? Because if it’s extremely unlikely to catch with shared touch points, and we would all be wearing masks and outdoors a lot of the times and overly sanitizing everything, it’s really messed up that theme parks have yet to be given reopening guidelines if zoos and aquariums can.
 

Phroobar

Well-Known Member
Didn't the CDC say Covid couldn't spread through surfaces?

I don't understand why Amusement/Theme parks are special. I have to imagine you'd be less likely to be exposed at an amusement park than at almost-always-completely-indoors aquariums.
Cold viruses have been shown to survive on indoor surfaces for approximately seven days. Flu viruses, however, are active for only 24 hours. It is unknown how long a Corona virus can stay active. It's probably closer to Flu viruses activity times.

All viruses have the potential to live on hard surfaces, such as metal and plastic, longer than on fabrics and other soft surfaces. In fact, infectious flu viruses can survive on tissues for only 15 minutes. Viruses tend to also live longer in areas with lower temperatures, low humidity, and low sunlight.
 

PiratesMansion

Well-Known Member
Here's what Harvard says about it (the article was last updated June 12th: I'll link to the full page if anyone's interested (https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-basics)):

How long can the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 survive on surfaces?
A recent study found that the COVID-19 coronavirus can survive up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard, and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel. The researchers also found that this virus can hang out as droplets in the air for up to three hours before they fall. But most often they will fall more quickly.

So I guess it depends on what surfaces are most prevalent in any given environment. But surely those 3-hour droplets have more places to disperse in a most parks than in most aquariums.

It would be nice if information was more definitive and easier to find.
 
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Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I kinda remember visiting Marine World in Redwood City around 1972.

Went to Marine World Africa USA in the early 1980's (Redwood City).

In 1998, went to the New Marine World to ride Kong.

Then went regularly after that. Was Interesting to see them try all the name changes and changing rides.

Glad to see them figuring out a way to reopen!
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Again, I'll repeat what I said in another thread....

The idea that "Museums, zoos, aquariums can open, but theme parks can't" seems so arbitrary to me. I think this Six Flags maneuver really underscores how silly of a distinction this is.

It does seem arbitrary. It's much like California barbers being allowed to reopen, but then for the next month nail salons were not allowed to reopen because they were "dirtier" and Covid-19 was first hatched in a California nail salon.

I only have vague knowledge of this Marine World park. I remember going to Great America several times in the 70's and 80's, but that is down in San Jose. But Vallejo is up near the northern end of the bay area? And if the cleanliness and operating standards are anything like Six Flags Magic Mountain... yikes.
 

DrAlice

Well-Known Member
Glad to see them figuring out a way to reopen!
So is Disneyland going to try something similar? They could open the park for restaurants and shopping only. They could also roll out all their selfie cutouts and have characters ride by on the Mark Twain or the DLRR and wave at everyone. :)
 

Phroobar

Well-Known Member
So is Disneyland going to try something similar? They could open the park for restaurants and shopping only. They could also roll out all their selfie cutouts and have characters ride by on the Mark Twain or the DLRR and wave at everyone. :)
I remember there was a plan for DCA to be turned into an extension of DTD by offering free admission but the ride count would be reduced to just B and C ticket rides with ticket booths outside. Other rides would be turned into shops and restaurants. That was Disney's "give up on DCA completely" plan.
 
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