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Dogs at DVC

John Dulmage

Active Member
Original Poster
Do any portions of any DVC resort allow dogs? I know some of the resorts started it a while back (not sure it is still going on), but wasn't sure if any DVC resort offered it.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
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Do any portions of any DVC resort allow dogs? I know some of the resorts started it a while back (not sure it is still going on), but wasn't sure if any DVC resort offered it.
No, but I’ve seen Goofy hanging around a few DVC resorts late night ;)

The closest dogs get to DVC is hotel rooms at Yacht Club unless they are service dogs which are allowed anywhere.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
The logistics won’t work. As it is they have a hard time cleaning villas and getting them ready in time for the next guest. Add in dog hair and it would be virtually impossible to get it done without adding more cleaning people and that would mean higher dues for everyone.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
Just curious, have people seen a lot of dogs at DVC villas? I don't mind a real service dog they are well trained...don't bark unless necessary, but if I see a therapy dog.. cripes I won't be happy.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Just curious, have people seen a lot of dogs at DVC villas? I don't mind a real service dog they are well trained...don't bark unless necessary, but if I see a therapy dog.. cripes I won't be happy.
I’ve never seen one personally. I’ve seen dogs in the parks more frequently than ever and it’s becoming increasingly popular to bring them on planes (although many of those are emotional support animals and not true service animals), but I’ve still not seen one at a DVC resort. I’m sure there are plenty of times service dogs are there but just not in my limited experiences.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
Just curious, have people seen a lot of dogs at DVC villas? I don't mind a real service dog they are well trained...don't bark unless necessary, but if I see a therapy dog.. cripes I won't be happy.
I never have at the resorts. I have only seen them in the parks. Service dogs are not a problem to me, but these therapy and emotional support dogs in my opinion are in the Parks. They are nowhere near well enough trained and they seem to be increasing in popularity. I really wish Disney would put a stop to that. Mostly because it's not fair to the dogs. Not to mention that these not so well trained dogs could cause problems with others.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I never have at the resorts. I have only seen them in the parks. Service dogs are not a problem to me, but these therapy and emotional support dogs in my opinion are in the Parks. They are nowhere near well enough trained and they seem to be increasing in popularity. I really wish Disney would put a stop to that. Mostly because it's not fair to the dogs. Not to mention that these not so well trained dogs could cause problems with others.
Legally, emotional support dogs are not service animals and not protected under the ADA. Disney’s official hotel policy is only service dogs are allowed at hotels and resorts. Emotional support dogs are only allowed at the handful of “dog friendly” hotels. Not sure why that policy doesn’t extend to the parks. Maybe because they are mostly outdoors.

I think it’s too bad that so many people have chosen to abuse the emotional support dog status. People who are well but selfishly want to bring their pet dog on a plane or to a hotel just go on line and buy the fake vests. The majority of people see a vest and assume it’s a real service dog. The problem is there are real emotional support dogs who have done wonders for people with PTSD and other serious issues. If it wasn’t for the people willing to abuse the system there could probably be an amendment to the ADA that includes mental illness. In today’s environment that probably will never happen since there are too many selfish “dog parents” who would just abuse it.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
Legally, emotional support dogs are not service animals and not protected under the ADA. Disney’s official hotel policy is only service dogs are allowed at hotels and resorts. Emotional support dogs are only allowed at the handful of “dog friendly” hotels. Not sure why that policy doesn’t extend to the parks. Maybe because they are mostly outdoors.

I think it’s too bad that so many people have chosen to abuse the emotional support dog status. People who are well but selfishly want to bring their pet dog on a plane or to a hotel just go on line and buy the fake vests. The majority of people see a vest and assume it’s a real service dog. The problem is there are real emotional support dogs who have done wonders for people with PTSD and other serious issues. If it wasn’t for the people willing to abuse the system there could probably be an amendment to the ADA that includes mental illness. In today’s environment that probably will never happen since there are too many selfish “dog parents” who would just abuse it.
Oh I know all about service dogs vs the others. In fact the policy DOES carry over to the parks. They have quite a lot of info for those with service animals. It's tough work working the parks with one. I've done it many times with friends. Though if one can go without it's better for the animal IMO (not all can go without, but I know many that can who do intentionally leave the dog in good care)

There are legit service dogs for PTSD as well as other mental illnesses. So they are covered if trained to do specific tasks.
 

John park hopper

Well-Known Member
I saw a few service dogs last week and they looked miserable from the heat (91 degrees). Is there a temperature cut off when you should not take a service dog out? As a Golden Retriever pet owner I would never subject my dog to that, seems kind of selfish on the part of the owner, please take your service dog when it's cooler
 
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helenabear

Well-Known Member
I saw a few service dogs last week and they looked miserable from the heat (91 degrees). Is there a temperature cut off when you should not take a service dog out? As a Golden Retriever pet owner I would never subject my dog to that, seems kind of selfish on the part of the owner, please take your service dog when it's cooler
I wouldn't ever call *needing* a service dog with you at all times no matter the heat selfish. Now there are some like my friends who are blind, who can go with out. They find taking them is harder and not easy on the dog for more than just heat reasons. Same with cruising, they leave them with specific trusted handlers. These are expensive animals to train so I guarantee you that if you see a legit service dog out and it's hot, the handler is taking well care of them. They are a lifeline to them, not just a friend.
 

John park hopper

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't ever call *needing* a service dog with you at all times no matter the heat selfish. Now there are some like my friends who are blind, who can go with out. They find taking them is harder and not easy on the dog for more than just heat reasons. Same with cruising, they leave them with specific trusted handlers. These are expensive animals to train so I guarantee you that if you see a legit service dog out and it's hot, the handler is taking well care of them. They are a lifeline to them, not just a friend.
My point is the heat is bad enough on us humans at WDW. Going to WDW is choice not a necessity would it not be better to go when it is cooler for the dog. I look at my own Golden and when it's 90+ agrees out she stays in the house has no desire to go out. Service dogs are valuable assets for many, I question the logic of not considering the dogs simply because they want to go to WDW just my 2 cents from a dog lover
 

TheGuyThatMakesSwords

Well-Known Member
My point is the heat is bad enough on us humans at WDW. Going to WDW is choice not a necessity would it not be better to go when it is cooler for the dog. I look at my own Golden and when it's 90+ agrees out she stays in the house has no desire to go out. Service dogs are valuable assets for many, I question the logic of not considering the dogs simply because they want to go to WDW just my 2 cents from a dog lover
Not unrelated.... has anyone else noticed The Orange County cars, parked, top of MK Bus Loop - engines idling?
Those cars contain Security Dogs. They keep 'em running (sometimes hood up), in order to run air conditioning for the poor guys :(.

I keep thinking MK should BUILD a little something, with AIR, for those poor guys :(.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
My point is the heat is bad enough on us humans at WDW. Going to WDW is choice not a necessity would it not be better to go when it is cooler for the dog. I look at my own Golden and when it's 90+ agrees out she stays in the house has no desire to go out. Service dogs are valuable assets for many, I question the logic of not considering the dogs simply because they want to go to WDW just my 2 cents from a dog lover
I get your point, but I hope you understand that these are not pets and handlers will do what is good or necessary. These animals are not valuable to many, they are valuable to *all* handlers. These people are disabled and I can tell you love and respect those dogs more than any pet owner. Please try not to judge if you see one. They also could be doing it short term and keeping the dog safely cool. Again these people know their dogs' worth and while I understand what you said, it does bother me that someone could be judging a person with disabilities.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Well-Known Member
Not unrelated.... has anyone else noticed The Orange County cars, parked, top of MK Bus Loop - engines idling?
Those cars contain Security Dogs. They keep 'em running (sometimes hood up), in order to run air conditioning for the poor guys :(.

I keep thinking MK should BUILD a little something, with AIR, for those poor guys :(.
Florida is always on the cutting edge.
I’m kidding...of course they are not.

Car idling is illegal in some places because that’s just common sense. Running an ICE to run an air conditioner condenser is about the worst thing you can do.

But to your point: a climate controlled security station would be a prudent move for the sheriff dogs
 

John park hopper

Well-Known Member
I am glad you know all disabled people and can make the statement valuable to "all". I did not know that anyone with a disability their judgement is unquestionable. As a pet owner I value my dog just as much as any handler and treat my dog accordingly. My original post was a concern for the service animal nothing more. Sorry I offended you.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
I am glad you know all disabled people and can make the statement valuable to "all". I did not know that anyone with a disability their judgement is unquestionable. As a pet owner I value my dog just as much as any handler and treat my dog accordingly. My original post was a concern for the service animal nothing more. Sorry I offended you.
Sorry I offended you. I work with groups to empower marginalized people and I do try to stand up for them whenever I see disparity. The adversity that most disabled people face from others is rather large, and that doesn't include the issues that the disabilities may cause.

My whole point is you are viewing it all like a pet owner, not a working animal owner. They are not the same and you really should not be projecting your feelings onto these working animals because it comes across as hurtful to the handlers I know. I think they know their dog worth about $20-40k better than anyone else.

With that, this has zero to do with dogs in the parks or resorts as service animals are not the issue.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
Here’s a can worms:

My opinion is it’s kinda cruel to bring non-service dogs to WDW in most cases.

So opinions do vary
I'm sure you will find people who disagree, but I absolutely do not understand why anyone would bring a non-working animal to the parks period. I don't even understand it to the room really when they have to be boarded or left by themselves in a room they don't know at all.
 
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