Do you think masks will be required at WDW when the state of Florida is in phase 3?

CLEtoWDW

Well-Known Member
I could see that as a possibility if one of two things can be achieved:
1) continually low occurrence of hospitalizations and deaths
2) a widespread therapeutic. So far most states only have about 5000 doses of Remdesivir on supply and that’s not nearly enough to respond to another spike in severe cases. According to Gilead they have drastically ramped up their production and should have much more widespread distribution by late summer. I could see that being a green light point to remove the mask requirement.
 

Giss Neric

Well-Known Member
In Phase 3, most businesses could operate at full capacity with social-distancing guidelines imposed for some, such as theme parks. It depends on what Disney does. If at Phase 3, there have been no reports of guests being tested positive while visiting their parks, then masks will likely be OPTIONAL and not REQUIRED. Theme parks are still mass gatherings.
 

NelleBelle

Well-Known Member
I could see WDW opening up to 75% capacity with the masks in place and 100% capacity at phase 4 with masks potentially optional. Does the state of FL have mapped out what their phases of reopening are?
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
In Phase 3, most businesses could operate at full capacity with social-distancing guidelines imposed for some, such as theme parks. It depends on what Disney does. If at Phase 3, there have been no reports of guests being tested positive while visiting their parks, then masks will likely be OPTIONAL and not REQUIRED. Theme parks are still mass gatherings.
Real problem that is going to be face by the country when theme parks start opening up is that when you have a park that caters to a large number of out of state guests, you don't really ever get a good understanding of how many new infections were actually directly caused by the theme park. When a local movie theater opens up if it causes a spike in infections it is pretty easy to see because the overwhelming majority of people that went to the theater lived in the same area and it shows up easily and quickly... Now assume you have 2 or 3 hundred people infected in a day at a Disney park, first problem is that more than half of those infected won't even show any symptoms... then of the ones that do show symptoms they won't likely be showing them for a few days to a week. So if the guest that was infected, got infected when they first arrived for a week long vacation they might show some symptoms before they leave... but then this virus doesn't hit you with the deathbed level symptoms at the start they will initially be much more subtle. So most people infected at Disney will be back home when they really start showing signs of infection. So they go see a doctor in any of a thousand different cities around the country... Will the doctors report that they were infected at Disney? Well they won't even know if it was at Disney or somewhere along the way there in say the airplane or airport... So it becomes difficult to even know if Disney was the place of infection and unlikely that Disney would be dubbed the infection point versus a movie theater where it would be much more likely that you would have enough of a cluster in a single area that the authorities would know that theaters were a problem.

For tracing infections at an amusement park like Disney you are going to be forced to look more at the employee infection rates than the guests to see if you have a problem with opening the park. And even then using employee infections will have problems, if their workers are mostly college age then the odds of them being asymptomatic and not showing the infection goes up... and of course it is going to be much easier to protect CMs than it is guests if for no other reason than the CMs in most cases will be less mobile staying in a specific area like a cashier that doesn't move so can have a plexiglass barrier in front of him/her reducing infection chances.

In the end mass gathering places probably need to be further divided into places that are driven by locals and driven by outsiders and those driven by outsiders should probably not be opened until you have met your opening criteria across the country and not just within the state.
 

Giss Neric

Well-Known Member
Real problem that is going to be face by the country when theme parks start opening up is that when you have a park that caters to a large number of out of state guests, you don't really ever get a good understanding of how many new infections were actually directly caused by the theme park. When a local movie theater opens up if it causes a spike in infections it is pretty easy to see because the overwhelming majority of people that went to the theater lived in the same area and it shows up easily and quickly... Now assume you have 2 or 3 hundred people infected in a day at a Disney park, first problem is that more than half of those infected won't even show any symptoms... then of the ones that do show symptoms they won't likely be showing them for a few days to a week. So if the guest that was infected, got infected when they first arrived for a week long vacation they might show some symptoms before they leave... but then this virus doesn't hit you with the deathbed level symptoms at the start they will initially be much more subtle. So most people infected at Disney will be back home when they really start showing signs of infection. So they go see a doctor in any of a thousand different cities around the country... Will the doctors report that they were infected at Disney? Well they won't even know if it was at Disney or somewhere along the way there in say the airplane or airport... So it becomes difficult to even know if Disney was the place of infection and unlikely that Disney would be dubbed the infection point versus a movie theater where it would be much more likely that you would have enough of a cluster in a single area that the authorities would know that theaters were a problem.

For tracing infections at an amusement park like Disney you are going to be forced to look more at the employee infection rates than the guests to see if you have a problem with opening the park. And even then using employee infections will have problems, if their workers are mostly college age then the odds of them being asymptomatic and not showing the infection goes up... and of course it is going to be much easier to protect CMs than it is guests if for no other reason than the CMs in most cases will be less mobile staying in a specific area like a cashier that doesn't move so can have a plexiglass barrier in front of him/her reducing infection chances.

In the end mass gathering places probably need to be further divided into places that are driven by locals and driven by outsiders and those driven by outsiders should probably not be opened until you have met your opening criteria across the country and not just within the state.
That too long of a read. First, when theme parks eventually reopen, there will be no out of state, out of country visitors for the near future. It will be all locals.
 

JIMINYCR

Well-Known Member
Well since Phase 3 allows businesses to open with continued social distancing and gives them the option of placing their own guidelines and protocols in place, it makes sense that Disney will be determining how safe it is to abandon masks. Theyll be watching very closely the numbers and severity of cases that come in all over the state and local area. I also think the CM's workers union may insist on longer safety precautions in place for their well being. They are going to be in close contact with guests and guest contaminated surfaces.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
That too long of a read. First, when theme parks eventually reopen, there will be no out of state, out of country visitors for the near future. It will be all locals.
That's wishful thinking. Just look at the number of people that are still going to Hawaii for vacations when the state has a 14 day quarantine for anyone that shows up local or out of staters. If Disney opens up you can be they will be filled with out of state visitors.
 

Katelynbird

Active Member
That's wishful thinking. Just look at the number of people that are still going to Hawaii for vacations when the state has a 14 day quarantine for anyone that shows up local or out of staters. If Disney opens up you can be they will be filled with out of state visitors.
I do agree with this when the parks open that guests will be coming from out of state. Now out of he country is a totally different story and I don't see that happening for some time.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
I do agree with this when the parks open that guests will be coming from out of state. Now out of he country is a totally different story and I don't see that happening for some time.
Out of country is beyond the control of Disney and will be determined by when the government allows international travel. But given the airlines are now hurting for customers, when international travel opens up I would actually expect to see lots of foreign visitors as the airline prices will probably be lower than they have been in a very long time. Imagine the possibility of someone in the UK getting the plane tickets at half price from usual, would they want to miss that savings?
 

Katelynbird

Active Member
Out of country is beyond the control of Disney and will be determined by when the government allows international travel. But given the airlines are now hurting for customers, when international travel opens up I would actually expect to see lots of foreign visitors as the airline prices will probably be lower than they have been in a very long time. Imagine the possibility of someone in the UK getting the plane tickets at half price from usual, would they want to miss that savings?
I agree that the prices will be lower. You also have to take into consideration what the other countries travel ban on flying is as well at the time. Flying I think is one of the peoples major concerns with this virus though and it will be interesting how people react when the international travel ban opens and flying is available again.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
I agree that the prices will be lower. You also have to take into consideration what the other countries travel ban on flying is as well at the time. Flying I think is one of the peoples major concerns with this virus though and it will be interesting how people react when the international travel ban opens and flying is available again.
Yeah, I've looked at some prices for visiting my wife's family in Brazil and the prices right now are much lower than usual. I can't remember them being this cheap in about 20 years. If the prices hold up when the world starts to become a bit more stable I can see a lot of people doing international trips that otherwise wouldn't.
 

Katelynbird

Active Member
Yeah, I've looked at some prices for visiting my wife's family in Brazil and the prices right now are much lower than usual. I can't remember them being this cheap in about 20 years. If the prices hold up when the world starts to become a bit more stable I can see a lot of people doing international trips that otherwise wouldn't.
I hope you are right. I am all for the economy to start going back up and things to get back to normal, but I also think people have to be super safe. What I am really afraid about is all the different things I am hearing from all the people who are suppose to be in charge of all of this. One group is saying everything is great and this will be all back to normal by the end of July and the other is saying if we move to fast it is all going to backfire in our faces. I honestly don't think any of them know what this virus is actually going to really do. That is what scares the you know what out of me. Am I going to be able to go back to college in the Fall or not? Those are the questions I ask myself.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
I hope you are right. I am all for the economy to start going back up and things to get back to normal, but I also think people have to be super safe. What I am really afraid about is all the different things I am hearing from all the people who are suppose to be in charge of all of this. One group is saying everything is great and this will be all back to normal by the end of July and the other is saying if we move to fast it is all going to backfire in our faces. I honestly don't think any of them know what this virus is actually going to really do. That is what scares the you know what out of me. Am I going to be able to go back to college in the Fall or not? Those are the questions I ask myself.
College is probably one of the last things to go back to normal. Not only do you have dorm rooms with lots of close quarters but you also have lots of old professors that will be at high risk of death if they catch it.
 

Katelynbird

Active Member
College is probably one of the last things to go back to normal. Not only do you have dorm rooms with lots of close quarters but you also have lots of old professors that will be at high risk of death if they catch it.
I am use to the online classes, but I am a Physical Education/Health Ed. major and many of my courses are performance based which can not be done online. I just guess I will have to push those classes back. I am only going to be a Sophomore in the Fall. I totally understand the dorm as it is not the most spacious environment.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
I am use to the online classes, but I am a Physical Education/Health Ed. major and many of my courses are performance based which can not be done online. I just guess I will have to push those classes back. I am only going to be a Sophomore in the Fall. I totally understand the dorm as it is not the most spacious environment.
Colleges are going to be a very interesting thing to watch, since at the larger universities you have a considerable number of foreign students, not sure how some of them will even be able to travel to the US given travel bans to some countries still exist and the some have already been extended.

I do understand the problem you'll have with performance classes I had one daughter with classes this term that were performance based and when the schools all shut down and went online in March the performance classes became a complete joke. If they go online they would hopefully stop offering performance driven classes until they can actually be on campus.
 
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