Do men NEVER stand up for women anymore??

Paper straw fan

Well-Known Member
First, I am sorry you have gone through those health situations. Second, I may not have clarified, this is not about me personally. I don't need people to stand for me personally. I am only 41, and in good shape, and perfectly capable of standing myself. But like this afternoon taking the resort bus from DHS back to MK. There was a woman who looked about late 60s to early 70s. She had a walking stick. Not a medical cane but a stick for walking hiking and so on. You could tell she needed it. She looked fatigued when she got on the bus. Red faced, breathing hard, not overweight but not in perfect shape. I looked around the bus and saw at least eleven other younger men who could have easily stood up and offered this woman a seat. Did they? Not one. That is all I was saying.
I get it. You have a point there. And I probably can dial down the woe is me, im fine- but I am sore after a day at a park or parks- if I’m seated, and see a healthy woman come aboard, at that point it’s just who gets there first, much like a parking spot!

I’ll hold doors, not for just women but everyone- I’ve gotten up on the buses for elderly and expecting moms, so I’m not quite the monster I make myself out as. But with my back, standing is the worst- I can walk all day, but just standing in place is hell. So I probably won’t be that first guy to offer, which is fine. There’s people in better shape usually.

This is also reason 78b why I try to avoid those buses. I’d rather be blindfolded and thrown in a sketchy van.
 
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Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
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You cannot ask for equality and preferential treatment.
Just like the people who complained when Disney finally ditched the old GAC system, which, unlike the DAS system allowed most holders unlimited use of the Fastpass queue. That was special treatment, not equal treatment.
 

Captain Obvious

Well-Known Member
First, I am sorry you have gone through those health situations. Second, I may not have clarified, this is not about me personally. I don't need people to stand for me personally. I am only 41, and in good shape, and perfectly capable of standing myself. But like this afternoon taking the resort bus from DHS back to MK. There was a woman who looked about late 60s to early 70s. She had a walking stick. Not a medical cane but a stick for walking hiking and so on. You could tell she needed it. She looked fatigued when she got on the bus. Red faced, breathing hard, not overweight but not in perfect shape. I looked around the bus and saw at least eleven other younger men who could have easily stood up and offered this woman a seat. Did they? Not one. That is all I was saying.
Curious but did you offer your seat to this woman who looked tired? Were you seated when she boarded the bus?
 

Captain Obvious

Well-Known Member
Yes, but that's now how it works. Common courtesy says one of the men should have had the decency to offer her a seat. I am surprised so many people act as if this rule is new. It's been around for generations to show respect, and now suddenly it is offensive. Manners and human decency have no shelf life.
So you saw this woman in her 60's who appeared exhausted and having a hard time standing, yet instead of offering up your own seat, you look around at the men and complain internally at their rudeness?
 
I am a advocate for womens equality.
Common courtesy says one of the men should have had the decency to offer her a seat
These two statements do not work together. You cannot say you believe in equality than expect a man to do something that you don’t expect a woman to do. Either you believe in equality or you do not. Which is it?
 

PiXie Mom

Member
Original Poster
So you saw this woman in her 60's who appeared exhausted and having a hard time standing, yet instead of offering up your own seat, you look around at the men and complain internally at their rudeness?
I was tired. DD was tired. Why should it be my responsibility?? That was the whole point of the thread question, but I didn't state it right. :hilarious::rolleyes:🤦 It's been a long day and we're at Epcot tomorrow, so I'll let it rest.
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
Yes, but that's now how it works. Common courtesy says one of the men should have had the decency to offer her a seat. I am surprised so many people act as if this rule is new. It's been around for generations to show respect, and now suddenly it is offensive. Manners and human decency have no shelf life.
You are just as obligated as any man to offer your seat to an elderly woman who was fatigued.
 

Mickey5150

Well-Known Member
When heading out in the morning I only offer my seat to people who really need it. At night I just don't sit because I don't need a seat. Although I do give my elderly mom a hard time when she is worried she will have to stand, she always finds a seat.
 

Shouldigo12

Well-Known Member
I was tired. DD was tired. Why should it be my responsibility?? That was the whole point of the thread question, but I didn't state it right. :hilarious::rolleyes:🤦 It's been a long day and we're at Epcot tomorrow, so I'll let it rest.
Why was it the men's? Seriously, they were probably tired too. If you weren't willing to stand up then obviously you didn't feel that bad for that poor woman.
 

thecompman

Member
First, I am sorry you have gone through those health situations. Second, I may not have clarified, this is not about me personally. I don't need people to stand for me personally. I am only 41, and in good shape, and perfectly capable of standing myself. But like this afternoon taking the resort bus from DHS back to MK. There was a woman who looked about late 60s to early 70s. She had a walking stick. Not a medical cane but a stick for walking hiking and so on. You could tell she needed it. She looked fatigued when she got on the bus. Red faced, breathing hard, not overweight but not in perfect shape. I looked around the bus and saw at least eleven other younger men who could have easily stood up and offered this woman a seat. Did they? Not one. That is all I was saying.
2 points come to mind here. If it's truly about the person being elderly and not about being a woman...then in the same guise of equality...why were you only upset that the able bodied men didn't offer a seat, why shouldn't any able bodied woman who is also not elderly offer their seat, I'm just confused as to why you singled out the men.

Further, this seems to be a problem society wide that we get upset about things that the person who it actually affects doesn't get upset about. In the case of this elderly person...there are signs on the bus in certain rows of seats that says "if requested by the elderly or disabled you must give up this seat"...so if the elderly lady herself wanted a seat, she easily could have asked for it, however you have taken it upon yourself to be upset for her when she may have been perfectly happy to stand.

Just some thoughts.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
The original post implies that this has been a common problem throughout your trip. Then later you state a single episode with one older woman. I guess I’m confused. Do you have other examples?

I’m all for offering a seat up to someone who looks like they could use it more than I, regardless of who they may be. (For the record, I’ve had men offer their seat to me, and I’ve never been offended by that, but I’ve never taken them up on it.)
 
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goofyyukyukyuk17

Well-Known Member
I was tired. DD was tired. Why should it be my responsibility?? That was the whole point of the thread question, but I didn't state it right. :hilarious::rolleyes:🤦 It's been a long day and we're at Epcot tomorrow, so I'll let it rest.
Why should it be a man’s responsibility? I would have stood up, but your argument is flawed. If you are completely for women’s equality to men, then it should be a joint responsibility to stand up for anybody in need. Who’s to say that the people who were on the bus with you weren’t just as tired as you? To say that a man should stand up instead of you, just because you’re a woman, completely undermines the argument of women’s equality. It’s either equality or preferential treatment. You can’t continue to have it both ways.
 

KAY823

New Member
My husband, daughter and myself have all given up our seats to others who appear to need it more than we did. I don’t care if they are male or female. What annoys me is the number of parents who don’t even try to pick up their child and hold them do someone else can sit. It often looks more dangerous to have them bobbing and weaving in a seat. The teenagers who also don’t rise and offer a seat to an elder is also disheartening. It called manners. Unfortunately I don’t think their importance is valued like they used to be. Simple Manners=common courtesy.
 
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