Disneyland and Disney World lay off 28,000 employees amid pandemic struggles - OCR/SCNG

Captn EO

Well-Known Member
I believe it. I was given a warning once for going to the nurse for a bloody thumb cut during my lunch break. They told me I would be written up if it happened again.

Disney makes billions per year, but one dollar missing is enough to fire someone. Ridiculous.
Wow. Holy crap! So sorry to hear about that.

Thats why I find it funny on here when posters say that their interaction with a Disney CM vs a Mall Employee is supposed to be so much different since they paid thousands for their trip.

At the end of the day the employee is getting maybe a dollar or two more than minimum wage but is supposed to be some happy go lucky miracle employee? Yeah right.

I never have the expectations that Disney employees have to "create magic" at all times. It's unfair to the workers.
 
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Disney Irish

Well-Known Member
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I never have the expectations that Disney employees have to "create magic" at all times. It's unfair to the workers.
But yet that is what Disney promotes, that its the CMs that "Create the Magic". So while it might be unfair its expected by guests because its the imagine that Disney has set.
 

SuddenStorm

Well-Known Member
It's worth mentioning that the level of service delivered by Disneyland CM's has declined sharply over the last 5 or so years. Sure, there's the occasional CM who really does an amazing job but for the most part your entry level worker there is very, very average.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
Wow. Holy crap! So sorry to hear about that.

Thats why I find it funny on here when posters say that their interaction with a Disney CM vs a Mall Employee is supposed to be so much different since they paid thousands for their trip.

At the end of the day the employee is getting maybe a dollar or two more than minimum wage but is supposed to be some happy go lucky miracle employee? Yeah right.

I never have the expectations that Disney employees have to "create magic" at all times. It's unfair to the workers.

Yes, the guests expect superb behavior and service from Disney employees because Disney has planted that. The problem is Disney doesn’t create a pleasant environment that encourages CMs to be of great service without Disney having to drill it into them. One of my leads pulled me to the side and told me to smile more. He didn’t bother to ask how I was doing, no concern about my well-being.

This is why I preferred working for Universal. The clientele is different and the company doesn’t put so much pressure on their team members. And I’ve witnessed lots of great customer service at Universal, both as an employee and as a guest.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Speaking of churro cart employees, the ones at Disney parks should definitely be making more than minimum wage, considering the incredibly high standards Disney forces on their employees.

I agree with that.

Federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour and California minimum wage is now $13 an hour (highest in the nation!), but Disneyland starts their CM's at $15.50 to $17 an hour depending on their department. I think that's probably about where they should be, maybe even $1 or $2 less per hour than I would think is appropriate for a few uniquely Disneyland gigs (Jungle Cruise, Security guards, Ky'le From Tustin in Star Wars Land explaining his backstory, etc.).

So if the average starting wage for entry-level CM's is now $16 an hour, and many of us think that's an appropriate starting wage give or take a dollar or two, it seems like almost all of us are pretty much on the same page here regarding CM wages. It could be a really interesting discussion here why Jungle Cruise Skippers should start at $18 an hour and be held to higher standards for showmanship and comedic timing.

But the moment Disneyland reopens, I'll head back to my table at the Plaza Inn so I can sit there yelling "You Suck!" at passing busboys. :cool:
 
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Captn EO

Well-Known Member
Yes, the guests expect superb behavior and service from Disney employees because Disney has planted that. The problem is Disney doesn’t create a pleasant environment that encourages CMs to be of great service without Disney having to drill it into them. One of my leads pulled me to the side and told me to smile more. He didn’t bother to ask how I was doing, no concern about my well-being.

This is why I preferred working for Universal. The clientele is different and the company doesn’t put so much pressure on their team members. And I’ve witnessed lots of great customer service at Universal, both as an employee and as a guest.
Yikes thats awful! That behavior would have me quitting in a heartbeat. That's so messed up.

As for your Universal example, I find that everywhere if someone is truly happy that it makes everything better. Forcing people to act happy and create "magical memories" is a recipe for anger/resentment.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
As for your Universal example, I find that everywhere if someone is truly happy that it makes everything better. Forcing people to act happy and create "magical memories" is a recipe for anger/resentment.

Yes, absolutely. I supervise a group of undergrad student workers at my university. Before corona, I created a pleasant, welcoming work environment, which in turn created happy employees who genuinely enjoyed their job and enjoyed coming in to work every day. Everything is on Zoom now, so it's very different.

It's not difficult at all to understand. When the work environment is not hostile and toxic, employees will most likely be happier and the quality of the work will be better.
 

Captn EO

Well-Known Member
Yes, absolutely. I supervise a group of undergrad student workers at my university. Before corona, I created a pleasant, welcoming work environment, which in turn created happy employees who genuinely enjoyed their job and enjoyed coming in to work every day. Everything is on Zoom now, so it's very different.

It's not difficult at all to understand. When the work environment is not hostile and toxic, employees will most likely be happier and the quality of the work will be better.
Totally true! I've noticed this with every job I have. Pressure on employees doesn't do as good a job as satisfaction amongst empmoyees.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Yes, the guests expect superb behavior and service from Disney employees because Disney has planted that. The problem is Disney doesn’t create a pleasant environment that encourages CMs to be of great service without Disney having to drill it into them. One of my leads pulled me to the side and told me to smile more. He didn’t bother to ask how I was doing, no concern about my well-being.

This is why I preferred working for Universal. The clientele is different and the company doesn’t put so much pressure on their team members. And I’ve witnessed lots of great customer service at Universal, both as an employee and as a guest.
It's not just at the front line level either. The most recent episode of the Themed Attraction Podcast was an interview with Brandon Kleyla, one of the designers of both Trader Sam's locations. Like so many, he ran out of work at Walt Disney Imagineering while working on Pandora and made the jump to Universal Creative to work on Universal Studios Beijing. During the interview he talks about the lack of politics and just being empowered to get things done. It is a sentiment that is heard or at least alluded to by others. Throughout, Disney has become this very toxic place to work.
 
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truecoat

Well-Known Member
Milton Friedman proposed a sort of universal basic income as part of Nixon's plans to overhaul the welfare system. Friedrich Hayek made supportive comments. The FairTax, a national sales tax proposal, has a sort of universal basic income in its "prebate" scheme. It's actually an idea that has been circling amongst some libertarians for decades, the idea being that you replace the myriad welfare programs, a complicated tax code with loop holes and social engineering incentives, and the massive bureaucracy that administers all of that with a single payment.

Trucking is working towards automation, it's not there yet but it's coming. Being one of the biggest employment sectors of every state, there will not be a replacement for the jobs lost. UI might get some traction when unemployment starts going through the roof.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
It's not just at the front line level either. The most recent episode of the Themed Attraction Podcast was an interview with Brandon Kleyla, one of the designs of both Trader Sam's locations. Like so many, he ran out of work at Walt Disney Imagineering while work on Pandora and made the jump to Universal Creative to work on Universal Studios Beijing. During the interview he talks about the lack of politics and just being empowered to get things done. It is a sentiment that is heard or at least alluded to by others. Throughout, Disney has become this very toxic place to work.

I distinctly remember having a guest control shift with someone else from attractions while working at Disneyland and she told me about her positive experiences working at Universal. She said she was planning to leave Disney and return to Universal as soon as she she could. I started working at Universal three year after that and immediately saw a difference and understood what the CM was talking about.

My uncle, who is now retired, was head of security at the Walt Disney Studios for decades and warned me about working for Disney, telling me “you don’t want to do it.” I’m glad I didn’t listen to him because I needed to see for myself. I always tell people who want to work for the company to go for it, as their experience may differ from mine. I always hope they have a better experience.

Is that interview with Brandon Kleyla on YouTube?
 

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
I distinctly remember having a guest control shift with someone else from attractions while working at Disneyland and she told me about her positive experiences working at Universal. She said she was planning to leave Disney and return to Universal as soon as she she could. I started working at Universal three year after that and immediately saw a difference and understood what the CM was talking about.

My uncle, who is now retired, was head of security at the Walt Disney Studios for decades and warned me about working for Disney, telling me “you don’t want to do it.” I’m glad I didn’t listen to him because I needed to see for myself. I always tell people who want to work for the company to go for it, as their experience may differ from mine. I always hope they have a better experience.

Is that interview with Brandon Kleyla on YouTube?
I'm sorry your experience wasn't what you wanted it to be. I personally have nothing but the fondest memories from my time in Burbank. I probably saw or interacted with your Uncle a few times too without realizing it.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Is that interview with Brandon Kleyla on YouTube?
It’s just a regular audio podcast. You can listen to it here:

They’re back catalogue is worth a listen as well. They get some surprisingly honest comments at times.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
I'm sorry your experience wasn't what you wanted it to be. I personally have nothing but the fondest memories from my time in Burbank. I probably saw or interacted with your Uncle a few times too without realizing it.

I’m happy you had a good experience! Honestly, I rarely hear people claim to have a positive experience, so it’s refreshing.

I wouldn’t doubt you most likely ran into my uncle! My dad used to work at the Studios as well, but this was back in the late 80s/early 90s.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
It’s just a regular audio podcast. You can listen to it here:

They’re back catalogue is worth a listen as well. They get some surprisingly honest comments at times.

Thank you for sharing! I will check out the rest of the catalogue as well.
 

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