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Disney World Chase Visa Premier $200 statement Credit is HOT

DManRightHere

Well-Known Member
I was just on the Disneyworld.com website, at the bottom of the page states $200 statement credit with $500 purchase within 3 months. It used to be a $200 gift card, I suppose a credit will be better if you save the money!

Also note the annual fee is $49 and appears to not be waived. Just cancel before the renewal. So you will basically have a $44 annual fee minus the $5 in points for first $500, this drops your statement profit to about $156
 
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FrostyNaples

Well-Known Member
I was just on the Disneyworld.com website, at the bottom of the page states $200 statement credit with $500 purchase within 3 months. It used to be a $200 gift card, I suppose a credit will be better if you save the money!

Also note the annual fee is $49 and appears to not be waived. Just cancel before the renewal. So you will basically have a $44 annual fee minus the $5 in points for first $500, this drops your statement profit to about $156

Or keep the card (1yr member here), and let the points build to pay for the AP renewals (just did) :D
 
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DManRightHere

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I have $0 annual fee cards that are higher than 2% CB, so I have no need for Disney premier. I'll keep my $49 lol. I still have the regular Disney card for perks, discounts, and 6 month 0% on Disney Vacations.

BTW if any credit card deadbeats are out there, citi premier card is doing waived 1st annual fee, plus 50,000 points (can get $500 in gift cards) when spending $3,000 in the first 3 months.
 
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CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
I have $0 annual fee cards that are higher than 2% CB, so I have no need for Disney premier. I'll keep my $49 lol. I still have the regular Disney card for perks, discounts, and 6 month 0% on Disney Vacations.
I can't say I recommend waiting until six months after a Disney vacation (or any vacation... or any purchase for that matter) before paying it off, zero percent or otherwise.
 
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flynnibus

Premium Member
I can't say I recommend waiting until six months after a Disney vacation (or any vacation... or any purchase for that matter) before paying it off, zero percent or otherwise.

No, you use the 6m to help pay off the amount you pre-paid. Like on a DCL cruise you pay either 10 or 20% up front. Then you can also use the 6m after you pay the balance at 75-120 days before cruising.

Or for WDW vacations, if you buy a package up front with tickets, etc.. you can use the time to diffuse the cost as well.

You are correct that the Disney Visa is not the best return on rewards... but some people like 'forced' savings for Disney... but the 6m free financing is easy to leverage and not a bad financial decision.

Why give other people your cash earlier than needed.
 
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BrianV

Well-Known Member
Only the premier has an annual fee. Regular has none. We only use for disney related stuff and indeed there are better card choices usually.
 
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BrianV

Well-Known Member
Credit card companies are not friends with people that pay off their balance. They like the desperate people that put $25k on it at 20+% interest per year.

I would say they have a love hate relationship with those of us who pay our balance in full. When the economy is bad and people are defaulting on their debt, they are happy to have a steady income from the percentage we spend on goods and services that they get to keep. When the economy is good, and some people are willing and able to carry $25k balances, indeed we become chopped liver.
 
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flynnibus

Premium Member
Credit card companies are not friends with people that pay off their balance. They like the desperate people that put $25k on it at 20+% interest per year.

I've never had a problem with a CC not giving me love (once brought to their attention) and I never carry balances. Threatening to leave still carriers weight and I'm sure they have great metrics on all your history.

When I stopped using Discover because my other cards were offering better deals... I would get all kinds offers to incentive me to use the discover more.

Even if you don't carry a balance, the card company is making good money on you from your merchant fees. No 1-2% is nothing like the 16-25% they make from people carrying balances... but they do seem to notice.

I've never been shunned for being a 'zero fee' customer.

Same thing with my bank... they get zero fees from me period. But leave 20k or so in your account and they will start calling :)
 
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CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
I would say they have a love hate relationship with those of us who pay our balance in full. When the economy is bad and people are defaulting on their debt, they are happy to have a steady income from the percentage we spend on goods and services that they get to keep.
They don't keep any percentage whatsoever if you're paying your balance in full. Interest doesn't kick in until after your grace period.
 
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CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Even if you don't carry a balance, the card company is making good money on you from your merchant fees. No 1-2% is nothing like the 16-25% they make from people carrying balances... but they do seem to notice.
Kind of. But those are two different companies. For example, if we're talking about that Chase Disney Visa, then Visa is collecting that 1-2%, but Chase doesn't see a dime until you pay interest.
 
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flynnibus

Premium Member
Kind of. But those are two different companies. For example, if we're talking about that Chase Disney Visa, then Visa is collecting that 1-2%, but Chase doesn't see a dime until you pay interest.

Not so - there are fees bundled into the system at nearly all the points in the system and the main 2% fee commonly seen is split by the issuing bank and the CC network.. not all to the network. No one is in this as a charity.. they all have their markups and fees at each point the money changes hands. For instance, in this example, if you use a Chase Disney card to pay for something costing $100 at Target... Chase skims a portion off the amount it actually pays the merchant's bank call the interchange fee. That interchange fee includes the cut going to Chase, and a cut going to Visa. Target's merchant's bank, then adds their own fees called the assessment. Target gets paid $100 - the interchange fee - assessment fees

Your Credit Card company gets paid...
Target's Merchant bank gets paid...
Visa gets paid...

It's all about transaction volume.
 
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BrianV

Well-Known Member
Not so - there are fees bundled into the system at nearly all the points in the system and the main 2% fee commonly seen is split by the issuing bank and the CC network.. not all to the network. No one is in this as a charity.. they all have their markups and fees at each point the money changes hands. For instance, in this example, if you use a Chase Disney card to pay for something costing $100 at Target... Chase skims a portion off the amount it actually pays the merchant's bank call the interchange fee. That interchange fee includes the cut going to Chase, and a cut going to Visa. Target's merchant's bank, then adds their own fees called the assessment. Target gets paid $100 - the interchange fee - assessment fees

Your Credit Card company gets paid...
Target's Merchant bank gets paid...
Visa gets paid...

It's all about transaction volume.

Exactly. And when times are bad, 1-2% with low risk of default keeps the credit card companies happy. Sure, they'd rather have low risk 20%, but that is rarely an option.

I've found that credit cards are very responsive when I have issues. Maybe they don't have much profit to make off me, but I have all the leverage to walk away. Not so easy if I owe them 20k.
 
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DManRightHere

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I would say they have a love hate relationship with those of us who pay our balance in full. When the economy is bad and people are defaulting on their debt, they are happy to have a steady income from the percentage we spend on goods and services that they get to keep. When the economy is good, and some people are willing and able to carry $25k balances, indeed we become chopped liver.

If you pay your statement balance in full every month, the credit card company doesn not make a dime from those people. They do make money from the merchant from the transactions though. Credit card card call people who never carry a balance "dead beats". Lol.
 
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BrianV

Well-Known Member
If you pay your statement balance in full every month, the credit card company doesn not make a dime from those people. They do make money from the merchant from the transactions though. Credit card card call people who never carry a balance "dead beats". Lol.

We can debate semantics here as far as who pays, but if I buy something that costs $100 using my credit card, the credit card company makes about $2 more money than they would have made if I paid cash. I'd agree with you if the merchant agreed to pay that transaction cost to the credit card company regardless of what method I paid by (cash, check, credit card). But since that is clearly not happening, that $2 the card company makes is directly linked to my using their card to pay for good and services. The more I spend, the more they make.
 
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