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Disney Should NOT allow kids on shoulders during fireworks

dreamfinder912

Well-Known Member
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You have made my point for me. Its about adapting. Don't throw a tantrum and fuss because some dad put his kid on his shoulders and blocked someone's view. It's not all about you. Adapt, and if you aren't willing to because you are just that unselfish, then you should know you're gonna have a bad view. But don't selfishly ask others to sacrifice their kids view to suit you and yours. As you said, it's not all about you
except holding your kid on your hip/side makes it so they can see AND the people behind you can see. That's being unselfish, and you get to share the experience with your kid instead of just hoisting them up and missing their faces light up.
 

RustySpork

Oscar Mayer Memer
except holding your kid on your hip/side makes it so they can see AND the people behind you can see. That's being unselfish, and you get to share the experience with your kid instead of just hoisting them up and missing their faces light up.
Bingo, if only someone could communicate to these guys that there was a better way in a way that they could understand. Maybe if we carved it on a cave wall or something using really simple pictures.
 

WDW_Emily

Well-Known Member
I have started to just change where I stand to avoid this issue. If I get there early enough, I go to the front of the castle because with the projections and fireworks, it truly is the best spot with the least obstructed view. Looking for a less crowded but still an awesome view? Head over near the flagpole. Most parents with kids back their either have their kids standing or the kiddos are sleeping in strollers. If you don't mind a somewhat obstructed view Tomorrowland near the purple wall is also amazing. Again, no parents lifting kiddos there.

I know it's obnoxious parents putting kids up on shoulders but kids cant see at 3ft tall either. I don't have kids of my own but when I do I will use the "kid on hip" technique to make the kid the same height as myself (a whopping 5'1" tall)
 

HongKongFu

New Member
I'd like to reintroduce the word "obtuse" in this thread due to the extreme blockheaded obstinance on display by at least 3 around here.
 
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made in china

New Member
I totally understand both sides of the argument. For me, I'm 50/50.

If I have to pick a "side" I'd say that the Disney promotional material with the child on the shoulder would be the arbitrator.

When we went to DL when my son was young, I may have been able to hold him up for a short time to my side, as has been suggested. But I'm not so strong and I'd eventually not be able to hold him that way for long. I could've had him on my shoulders for much longer. As he got bigger, I'd only be able to sit him on my shoulders.

We were lucky back then, we lived in a community that allows fireworks, so fireworks were not a 'must see" and the poor viewlines around shoulder-sitters didn't ruin our experience, we could just go home and blow up $100 worth of fireworks and get the same effect.
 

Chi84

Well-Known Member
Well I’m a 5’4”, 115 pound woman and I can hold a child at my eye level. What comments are you referring to?

I thought it was just a choice. I didn’t realize people were putting kids on their shoulders because they were physically incapable of holding them.
 
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Tick Tock

Well-Known Member
There's always the 'My First Parachute' option. You can find some used ones for pretty cheap online.

Basically how they work:
Once HEA starts, simply toss your child high enough to where he/she can view the show above all other obstructing crowds. When the child reaches an altitude of approx. 25-ft above the ground, the parachute automatically deploys, allowing for a gentle descent down to your arms. With a quick touch of a button on the harness, the parachute retracts back into the case, and is ready for your child to be launched again for further firework viewing. Can be repeated as many times as necessary.
7132019b.jpg

This was a method my parents used for me to enjoy MK fireworks when I was little, as well as my little sister, and we only had one mishap with the product with my younger brother (may he rest in peace :( ). But never did we have any issue of obstructing others as they viewed the show.
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
There's always the 'My First Parachute' option. You can find some used ones for pretty cheap online.

Basically how they work:
Once HEA starts, simply toss your child high enough to where he/she can view the show above all other obstructing crowds. When the child reaches an altitude of approx. 25-ft above the ground, the parachute automatically deploys, allowing for a gentle descent down to your arms. With a quick touch of a button on the harness, the parachute retracts back into the case, and is ready for your child to be launched again for further firework viewing. Can be repeated as many times as necessary.
View attachment 389444

This was a method my parents used for me to enjoy MK fireworks when I was little, as well as my little sister, and we only had one mishap with the product with my younger brother (may he rest in peace :( ). But never did we have any issue of obstructing others as they viewed the show.
I’m sorry, but one little boy’s view WAS obstructed when the parachute was directly blocking that big pink firework within the bigger green one. He only saw the green.

Only saw the green.😢
 
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Bleed0range

Well-Known Member
I honestly have been to the parks many times both before and after being a parent and I’ve never felt annoyed by kids on their parents shoulders or felt like anyone was upset around me. That’s sort of why I am shocked by 30+ pages of discussion on the topic. There’s a lot of people in the world and at Disney as in anywhere else, you just have to learn to share the space.
 
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Editor516

Member
One or two days a month can be declared “kid-free” days in each park. No one under 10, or 12, or maybe 16 (I'm open-minded), allowed in.

And if Disney wants to monetize this - and you know they would - they can charge extra for adults who want to roam the Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Blizzard Beach, etc., without children around. They can even partner with an airline that wants to offer kid-free flights to and from Orlando International.

There. Problem solved. You're welcome.
 
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