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Disney Should NOT allow kids on shoulders during fireworks

Chi84

Well-Known Member
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All fathers should help their tiny children. They should be there for them every step of the way, teaching them values and how to respect themselves and others. I hope we’re not failing our children by displaying self-centered attitudes and showing them that others do not matter. There’s too much of that in the world today. As you can see, that attitude looks pretty ugly in an adult.
 
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larryz

Can't 'Member Anything
Premium Member
1. There is no one behind them
2. The fireworks are behind them which means they are not looking at the fireworks but staring aimlessly at Casey Jr.s 🤨
I volunteer in a museum full of big airplanes where, if you're carrying a child on your shoulders and are not really careful, you can dent an airplane and leave bloody marks on foreheads. Throw in that the floor is a concrete slab at least a foot thick that is not getting any softer, and you have a recipe for disaster should a kid take a head dive.

Yet gently reminding visitors of those two points usually elicits "Thanks. I'll be careful."

So it seems that not even pointing out the potential for injury to their child will dissuade them from this behaviour.

God forbid that Dad or Mom should trip on a curb or someone else's feet while their child is five feet or so above the pavement... in the dark... with loud, distracting noises and music going on around and over them...
 

Chi84

Well-Known Member
Couldn't agree more. It is horrifying to see the joy on a 6 year old's face as they watch Happily Ever After while their daddy lifts them up on his shoulders. Appalling, the lack of human decency.
The child would be just as delighted being held up at the parent’s eye level, and it would give the people behind them - both children and adults - a better chance to see. This has more to do with entitled parents than with children. I’m all in favor of trying to give your children the best of everything - but not at the expense of someone else’s children. And somewhere along the way when they are old enough to understand, it’s okay to teach your children that it’s not all about them. Because if you don’t, the adult world definitely will and they won’t be prepared for it.
 
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RustySpork

Oscar Mayer Memer
I volunteer in a museum full of big airplanes where, if you're carrying a child on your shoulders and are not really careful, you can dent an airplane and leave bloody marks on foreheads. Throw in that the floor is a concrete slab at least a foot thick that is not getting any softer, and you have a recipe for disaster should a kid take a head dive.

Yet gently reminding visitors of those two points usually elicits "Thanks. I'll be careful."

So it seems that not even pointing out the potential for injury to their child will dissuade them from this behaviour.

God forbid that Dad or Mom should trip on a curb or someone else's feet while their child is five feet or so above the pavement... in the dark... with loud, distracting noises and music going on around and over them...
They'd be the fastest to contact an attorney and sue though if they did fall because in their minds it would be your fault.
 

Kingoglow

Well-Known Member
Pretty sure the "others" we dads ARE concerned about are our children who want to be able to see the show. Selfish? If you say that your view is more important than my child's view I guess we're just being selfish then... we just aren't as concerned with you as we are our own children. I know that is highly offensive to you that dad's like me would want to give their own children a good time at Disney World.
If you want to be the world's best parent and ensure that kids get a good view, just show up to the show 2 hours early along with all the other world's best parents. Boom you kid can see, and you are not denying anyone else the opportunity to do so.
 
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flynnibus

Well-Known Member
I just love people that insist the world is all about them and only them... and then can't face the reality that their existence is possible only through the communal interests of other people.

You wanna be 'me me me' - then we should give them what they ask for... NOTHING from anyone else.
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
the fireworks are pretty tricky especially with the added projections. Disney encourages guests to pack in for the show, so it ends up being wall to wall people which does present a challenge for kids, and those in wheelchairs.

It is pretty discouraging when you think you have found the perfect view, waited however long, and then boom a pop-up kid blocks your view. That’s a pretty understandable frustration.
 

RustySpork

Oscar Mayer Memer
You check mated me man. Next time my kid is crying because he can't see the show, instead of picking him up, I'll show him this nugget of wisdom so that he knows he's down where he belongs. Wouldn't want to let him see the show because you said that makes me selfish, entitled, and self centered.
Why so dramatic, just get there earlier or suffer in the back with the rest of us. You could also, and this might blow your mind...hold your kid at eye level.
 

zurj

Member
That, or you could lose the drama and hold him up at your eye level where he’ll see just fine without blocking the kids behind him.
You were the one who brought up crying children, people on ecv, grandma's with babies, etc. I was using your image partner.
 
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