Disney Genie, Genie+ officially introduced along with confirmed details of how it will work

ParentsOf4

Well-Known Member
Disney has stated they want to control crowds to maintain a good guest experience. That's why annual passes are pricey and now come with a reservation system.
Disney already has a way to control crowds. It's called Park Pass.

If Disney really wanted to control crowds in order to "maintain a good guest experience", they could set Park Pass to whatever levels they want. Instead, they increased the number of Park Passes even as COVID surged in Florida.

Let's see what's really going on here.
  • Disney ended the free FastPass+ and replaced it with a cash system that could cost Guests $50 or more per person per day.
  • Disney ended Extra Magic Hours, and is limiting its replacement to Deluxe Resort Guests only, and only (it appears) for the 2 slowest nights of the week in an effort to boost Deluxe Resort occupancy.
  • Disney is ending Disney's Magical Express to reduce its costs. (Seriously, how does this remotely "maintain a good guest experience?")
  • Disney charges for hotel parking, when it used to be included in the price of the hotel. (This improves Guest experience how?)
  • Disney raised hotel rack rates by about a total of 30% over the last few years.
  • Disney is offering no hotel discounts after September.
  • Disney now charges for MagicBands, something that used to be included in the price of an onsite stay. (Yes, Guests love paying for something they used to get for free.)
  • Disney has closed numerous shows and meet & greets, and is only slowly bringing these back, yet is still charging full price for tickets.
  • Disney increased annual pass prices by 25% for the very reason CEO Bob Chapek explicitly stated earlier this year:
Things like annual pass. There's probably no better example here than annual pass, where it's a legacy system, and people keep signing up year after year after year, which may or may not play into your yield management strategy in an ideal way. So we had a chance to thoughtfully and thoroughly reconsider that.

Disney doesn't give a hoot about "controlling crowds" or a "good guest experience."

The only thing corporate Disney cares about is money.
 

runnsally

Well-Known Member
Disney already has a way to control crowds. It's called Park Pass.

If Disney really wanted to control crowds in order to "maintain a good guest experience", they could set Park Pass to whatever levels they want. Instead, they increased the number of Park Passes even as COVID surged in Florida.

Let's see what's really going on here.
  • Disney ended the free FastPass+ and replaced it with a cash system that could cost Guests $50 or more per person per day.
  • Disney ended Extra Magic Hours, and is limiting its replacement to Deluxe Resort Guests only, and only (it appears) for the 2 slowest nights of the week in an effort to boost Deluxe Resort occupancy.
  • Disney is ending Disney's Magical Express to reduce its costs. (Seriously, how does this remotely "maintain a good guest experience?")
  • Disney charges for hotel parking, when it used to be included in the price of the hotel. (This improves Guest experience how?)
  • Disney raised hotel rack rates by about a total of 30% over the last few years.
  • Disney is offering no hotel discounts after September.
  • Disney now charges for MagicBands, something that used to be included in the price of an onsite stay. (Yes, Guests love paying for something they used to get for free.)
  • Disney has closed numerous shows and meet & greets, and is only slowly bringing these back, yet is still charging full price for tickets.
  • Disney increased annual pass prices by 25% for the very reason CEO Bob Chapek explicitly stated earlier this year:
Things like annual pass. There's probably no better example here than annual pass, where it's a legacy system, and people keep signing up year after year after year, which may or may not play into your yield management strategy in an ideal way. So we had a chance to thoughtfully and thoroughly reconsider that.

Disney doesn't give a hoot about "controlling crowds" or a "good guest experience."

The only thing corporate Disney cares about is money.
100%. Anyone with a guest services complaint about future crowds should start with this.
 
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Patcheslee

Well-Known Member
I don't want to put the date out there yet as its still fluid as far as I know, but they should definitely be prepared.
Why does this pop in my head reading those words? 😁 53ab356d6bb3f7550691ee2d.jpeg
 

drew81

Well-Known Member
Disney already has a way to control crowds. It's called Park Pass.

If Disney really wanted to control crowds in order to "maintain a good guest experience", they could set Park Pass to whatever levels they want. Instead, they increased the number of Park Passes even as COVID surged in Florida.

Let's see what's really going on here.
  • Disney ended the free FastPass+ and replaced it with a cash system that could cost Guests $50 or more per person per day.
  • Disney ended Extra Magic Hours, and is limiting its replacement to Deluxe Resort Guests only, and only (it appears) for the 2 slowest nights of the week in an effort to boost Deluxe Resort occupancy.
  • Disney is ending Disney's Magical Express to reduce its costs. (Seriously, how does this remotely "maintain a good guest experience?")
  • Disney charges for hotel parking, when it used to be included in the price of the hotel. (This improves Guest experience how?)
  • Disney raised hotel rack rates by about a total of 30% over the last few years.
  • Disney is offering no hotel discounts after September.
  • Disney now charges for MagicBands, something that used to be included in the price of an onsite stay. (Yes, Guests love paying for something they used to get for free.)
  • Disney has closed numerous shows and meet & greets, and is only slowly bringing these back, yet is still charging full price for tickets.
  • Disney increased annual pass prices by 25% for the very reason CEO Bob Chapek explicitly stated earlier this year:
Things like annual pass. There's probably no better example here than annual pass, where it's a legacy system, and people keep signing up year after year after year, which may or may not play into your yield management strategy in an ideal way. So we had a chance to thoughtfully and thoroughly reconsider that.

Disney doesn't give a hoot about "controlling crowds" or a "good guest experience."

The only thing corporate Disney cares about is money.
Preach, @ParentsOf4!! 🙏
Many of those offerings are never returning!
 

James Alucobond

Well-Known Member
Disney is becoming Six Flags. Look at this presentation and attention to detail

pay more and we get less - the new Di$ney

View attachment 584116
Don't their first passes on things like this usually look like that until they can spend more time on each one and/or have time to fabricate all the requisite awnings, signs, and billboards? Same thing happened with the removal of the Sorcerers of the Magic Kingdom stuff, where they did quick patching that they revisited in the coming weeks using proper materials.
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
Disney is becoming Six Flags. Look at this presentation and attention to detail

pay more and we get less - the new Di$ney all in one photo

View attachment 584116

If these signs are still this way a year from now - ok. If not, just accept the world can't pivot overnight and change looks very different under the daily scrutiny that the parks get now.
 

James Alucobond

Well-Known Member
They aren’t pivoting overnight tho. This has been in the works for years and this isn’t going live next week.
Yes, but many of these require filing permits for new sign installation and assigning resources to do the installation. To ensure all signs are consistent as quickly as possible, they do this first and then deploy teams to go to them individually and give each instance the attention it deserves. As others said, if this persists for too long, it's worthy of a complaint. Reinstalling a ton of unique signage overnight isn't realistic. Covering existing signage in vinyl is.
 

GhostHost1000

Premium Member
Yes, but many of these require filing permits for new sign installation and assigning resources to do the installation. To ensure all signs are consistent as quickly as possible, they do this first and then deploy teams to go to them individually and give each instance the attention it deserves. As others said, if this persists for too long, it's worthy of a complaint. Reinstalling a ton of unique signage overnight isn't realistic. Covering existing signage in vinyl is.
I get what you’re saying but this isnt changing the sign for a new hot dog at Casey’s, this is the new future of the parks with a lot of negative feedback already and stuff like this isn’t going to help. Just my opinion
 

James Alucobond

Well-Known Member
I get what you’re saying but this isnt changing the sign for a new hot dog at Casey’s, this is the new future of the parks with a lot of negative feedback already and stuff like this isn’t going to help. Just my opinion
I think that, in their estimation, having a mixture of some signage for FastPass+ and some for Lightning Lane is a worse look than having it all say Lightning Lane at once even if they have to do touch-ups later.
 

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