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Disney buys 1000 acres of land

Rteetz

Well-Known Member
Original Poster

seascape

Well-Known Member
It does sound like Disney will keep this extra land for conservation trade to develop more of WDW. It looks like a 5th gate will happen down the road or expansion of the foot prints of the existing 4 gates. Expansion of the footprints makes more sense as the marginal costs would be lower. In any case this purchase of extra land clearly indicates that Disney is getting ready for a major announcement as soon as Universal announces their so called 4th gate, everyone knows its actually their 3rd.
 
It does sound like Disney will keep this extra land for conservation trade to develop more of WDW. It looks like a 5th gate will happen down the road or expansion of the foot prints of the existing 4 gates. Expansion of the footprints makes more sense as the marginal costs would be lower. In any case this purchase of extra land clearly indicates that Disney is getting ready for a major announcement as soon as Universal announces their so called 4th gate, everyone knows its actually their 3rd.
Is there a time line for Universal?
 

GhostHost1000

Well-Known Member
It does sound like Disney will keep this extra land for conservation trade to develop more of WDW. It looks like a 5th gate will happen down the road or expansion of the foot prints of the existing 4 gates. Expansion of the footprints makes more sense as the marginal costs would be lower. In any case this purchase of extra land clearly indicates that Disney is getting ready for a major announcement as soon as Universal announces their so called 4th gate, everyone knows its actually their 3rd.
Clearly indicates?
 

monothingie

Ridiculous Protector of the Status Quo
Premium Member
The key phrase being "long term", buying the land is just the first step in a long process before they could start using existing land for development.
Just curious as to why now. I’m not familiar with land costs in central Florida but I would think they would be at the high end of the scale at the moment.
 

danlb_2000

Premium Member
So if Disney wants to build more park, they have to buy more outside of their current 'world' to keep the % of conservation area the same?
If they want to build on land that is currently set aside for conservation then yes, they would need to buy more land to offset this. They did that a few years ago when they bought 3000 acres off site, and part of that was to release the land between DHS and Victory way from the conservation easement.
 

danlb_2000

Premium Member
Why now? Maybe because, unless you are a rich oil despot, they aren't making any more land. Also, if never used, land will probably be more valuable in the future than it is now. Get it while it is available.
It might be that simple. The land this article was talking about was going to be used for another Celebration type planned community, but maybe that project fell apart and the land became available. $23 million is pocket change for Disney.
 

DDLand

Well-Known Member
Here’s a little background for those who may not know. When Walt Disney World was first being created, they pledged that a certain proportion of land would be kept for conservation purposes. It was something like for every two acres developed, one would be kept undisturbed. Walt Disney World sits within important swamp lands that feed into the Everglades. So conservation was important from the start.

Now jump forward a couple decades, and that actually starts to become a limitation. Walt Disney World is in the midst of an enormous expansion. It needs to free up land in order to continue to expand. So several years back, Walt Disney World bought land outside in order to allow them to develop more property. This is the same strategy.

Additionally, forests make for great carbon and water sinks. They can hold enormous amounts of both. By having undeveloped land, it actually reduces the chance of flooding in other areas and offsets carbon use. On the other hand, buildings, roads, and parking lots are impermeable, or don’t drain well and don’t hold water. Walt Disney World has to constantly manage its water to avoid flooding through a series of lakes, canals, and forests. With this property, it will ease water drainage and offset their carbon use.

This is planning for the next couple decades. Here’s an example of what they did last time:
https://www.nature.org/en-us/get-involved/how-to-help/places-we-protect/the-disney-wilderness-preserve/
 
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