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Disney Bloggers

JIMINYCR

Well-Known Member
Wellll... $3 an article sounds about right. After all what weve seen a lot of the time are a lot of them are rehashing info thats in other articles, lots of articles are splattered with incorrect info or blatant mistakes. Some as you read through you wonder if thevve even been to a Disney park. Sure there are lots that are professionally researched and done and provide a great service to the WDW traveller, but sometimes I do wonder whose doing these articles?
 

OrlandoRising

Active Member
I assumed a lot of the Disney bloggers did it for access/privilege more than anything.
I can understand why people would think that, but in my experience, you have to have a sizable following or readership before Disney would give you special access to anything. It takes a lot of work to get to the place where Disney notices you.

Even then, invites would likely be marked as non-transferable, so a site owner or another member of its staff couldn't easily just pass it off to a random freelance contributor.
 

wdwfan22

Well-Known Member
3 dollars sounds about right as all they are doing is rephrasing a Disney press release or reviewing a food item that I can’t imagine many people will read anyways.
 

Astrotrain

New Member
Nice, $3 is 2/3 of the way to being able to buy a powerade in the parks. :cool:

I'm a professional writer, not for Disney or anything Disney related. That seems like a really low number even if the person is just trying to add to their experience. I guess it depends on if it's original content or not though. Not sure how it is with Disney news but there are centralized press access websites where content can be copy/pasted. The managers for whatever website the 'writer' is working for essentially has a license (usually paid for) that gives them the rights to publish certain content that originated elsewhere on their blog/website.

I don't remember the logistics of how it all works, but when I was working for blogs I could only edit it so much and always had to give credit to the original author of the article.
 
Whether they're bloggers or the ones who post on Youtube, they're all really just a part of the Mouse machine.

Rare is any real journalistic writing seen: It all comes across as carefully-worded press release. It's clear that nearly all of them don't want to get on Disney's bad side with any real talk.

More impressive to me is watching the video-based folks get 'excited' for something as mundane as a cupcake. They treat these things as seriously as a Chinese red-letter day. It's awesome (and ridiculously funny).
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
$3 is pitiful for a site that is getting decent traffic and generating decent ad revenue. To give a comparison, I'll make that much on a video that only gets 750 views on Youtube, and that's with them taking 50% of the ad revenue. And most of those sites mentioned in the article are generating a lot more ad revenue that that on each of those articles.

the reason they can get away with it is how excited many of the contributors feel to "be a part of something big" and to see their names in the byline, like they are accomplishing something hugely important, admirable and brag worthy. And because so many are happy to do it just for the ego-feed, they can get away with paying peanuts.
 
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