COVID-19

thomas998

Well-Known Member
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My only question is why is everyone calling it the covid-19, it would be easier and more accurate to call it the Wuhan flu. When a flu popped up from Hong Kong in the late 60's it was called the Hong Kong flu because it was accurate and descriptive, yet now if you call it the Wuhan flu it seems to upset the Chinese because they are embarrassed by the fact that it came from their country and probably came about because they seem to enjoy eating anything that moves. Maybe the world should only refer to it as the Wuhan flu to shame the Chinese into closing down these nasty wild animal markets.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
My only question is why is everyone calling it the covid-19, it would be easier and more accurate to call it the Wuhan flu. When a flu popped up from Hong Kong in the late 60's it was called the Hong Kong flu because it was accurate and descriptive, yet now if you call it the Wuhan flu it seems to upset the Chinese because they are embarrassed by the fact that it came from their country and probably came about because they seem to enjoy eating anything that moves. Maybe the world should only refer to it as the Wuhan flu to shame the Chinese into closing down these nasty wild animal markets.

“Having a name matters to prevent the use of other names that can be inaccurate or stigmatizing,” said Director-General of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “It also gives us a standard format to use for any future coronavirus outbreaks.” The WHO referenced guidelines set in 2015 that ensure the name does not refer to a geographical location, an animal, an individual or group of people, while still being pronounceable and related to the disease.

 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
“Having a name matters to prevent the use of other names that can be inaccurate or stigmatizing,” said Director-General of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “It also gives us a standard format to use for any future coronavirus outbreaks.” The WHO referenced guidelines set in 2015 that ensure the name does not refer to a geographical location, an animal, an individual or group of people, while still being pronounceable and related to the disease.

That is my point. It should stigmatize the Chinese for allowing this thing to happen in the first place. Bad actions without consequences will result in the continued bad actions. China should be shamed globally for what they did and calling a spade a spade is the first step.

There is little reason to listen let alone follow anything the WHO says because the organization is so corrupt it makes the mafia look like good guys.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
That is my point. It should stigmatize the Chinese for allowing this thing to happen in the first place. Bad actions without consequences will result in the continued bad actions. China should be shamed globally for what they did and calling a spade a spade is the first step.

There is little reason to listen let alone follow anything the WHO says because the organization is so corrupt it makes the mafia look like good guys.

"The Chinese" number over one billion. Are they all to blame in your opinion? It's precisely because of the kind of stigmatisation you're advocating that Asian people are being shunned and attacked. Now is not the time for petty jingoism.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
"The Chinese" number over one billion. Are they all to blame in your opinion? It's precisely because of the kind of stigmatisation you're advocating that Asian people are being shunned and attacked. Now is not the time for petty jingoism.
And exactly where are the Chinese being attacked? Sorry but that's just throwing up a defense to the indefensible. China caused this and is shouldn't be hidden, ignoring that fact is the same kind of action that allowed the likes of Harvey Weinstein to rape women for decades because people weren't willing to out what was wrong.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
And exactly where are the Chinese being attacked? Sorry but that's just throwing up a defense to the indefensible. China caused this and is shouldn't be hidden, ignoring that fact is the same kind of action that allowed the likes of Harvey Weinstein to rape women for decades because people weren't willing to out what was wrong.

In answer to your question, cases of (sometimes violent) racism against Asian (not just Chinese) people have been well documented in the news. If you haven’t heard about them, you should increase the number and range of the media outlets you follow.

As to the rest, China itself has lost thousands of people to this thing. I’m not going to castigate an entire nation for the shortfalls of its government, which, it should be noted, has received praise for its containment efforts after an initially problematic response.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
In answer to your question, cases of (sometimes violent) racism against Asian (not just Chinese) people have been well documented in the news. If you haven’t heard about them, you should increase the number and range of the media outlets you follow.

As to the rest, China itself has lost thousands of people to this thing. I’m not going to castigate an entire nation for the shortfalls of its government, which, it should be noted, has received praise for its containment efforts after an initially problematic response.

I've seen none in the US. There are some in Europe but in Europe right now there is a lot of animosity against any foreigners regardless of where they are from.

As for China being praise for finally containing it... sorry but their actions of trying to cover it up are what put the world in the place it is today. If someone lights a fire in your barn and burns it down it doesn't matter if they did a good job helping to put it out, they still started the fire and China still started this disaster.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
That is my point. It should stigmatize the Chinese for allowing this thing to happen in the first place. Bad actions without consequences will result in the continued bad actions. China should be shamed globally for what they did and calling a spade a spade is the first step.

There is little reason to listen let alone follow anything the WHO says because the organization is so corrupt it makes the mafia look like good guys.
Has this ever worked? Shaming a country into doing something? Have the people of Lyme Connecticut gottin rid of all those nasty deer ticks yet?
We should be working with China, sharing info...not pointing fingers.
 
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thomas998

Well-Known Member
Has this ever worked? Shaming a country into doing something? Have the people of Lyme Connecticut gottin rid of all those nasty deer ticks yet, the bastards?
We should be working with China, sharing info...not pointing fingers.
Well that's a very poor analogy now isn't it. The people of Lyme Connecticut have no more control over deer ticks than you have over the weather... but the Chinese government had the ability to shut down the wild animal markets, they had the ability to be open an honest when the first cases were popping up, but they didn't do the right thing. Stop making excuses for their actions, what they did and what they didn't do has already killed thousands and it is very likely to hundreds of thousands if not more before it is all over with.
 
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raven24

Well-Known Member
My only question is why is everyone calling it the covid-19, it would be easier and more accurate to call it the Wuhan flu. When a flu popped up from Hong Kong in the late 60's it was called the Hong Kong flu because it was accurate and descriptive, yet now if you call it the Wuhan flu it seems to upset the Chinese because they are embarrassed by the fact that it came from their country and probably came about because they seem to enjoy eating anything that moves. Maybe the world should only refer to it as the Wuhan flu to shame the Chinese into closing down these nasty wild animal markets.

What an awful thing to say. This type of negativity is not welcomed.

If we’re going to rename coronavirus/COVID-19 to the “Wuhan flu,” then we should rename the multitude of diseases brought over from Europe.

Since there are so many, we can bunch all of them together and call the group of diseases “Europe’s fault,” or “white people diseases.”
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
What an awful thing to say. This type of negativity is not welcomed.

If we’re going to rename coronavirus/COVID-19 to the “Wuhan flu,” then we should rename the multitude of diseases brought over from Europe.

Since there are so many, we can bunch all of them together and call the group of diseases “Europe’s fault,” or “white people diseases.”
Spanish flu was named based on its origin. As was Ebola.

I think this is much a do about nothing.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
I get it. At the same time- calling it Wuhan flu is a statement of origin. If people want to assume it’s racist, so be it. That’s their decision.

What advantages do you see such a name offering? How would it help the situation in any way?
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
What advantages do you see such a name offering? How would it help the situation in any way?
How does it hurt? The reality is what it is...historically diseases were named predominantly based on location of origin. Not sure why for this one, we need it addressed differently. I personally do not care one iota what people call it. Just not opposed or offended either way.

Edit: Just to add (per the federalist)
  • West Nile Virus
Named after the West Nile District of Uganda discovered in 1937.

  • Guinea Worm
Named by European explorers for the Guinea coast of West Africa in the 1600s.

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
Named after the mountain range spreading across western North America first recognized first in 1896 in Idaho.

  • Lyme Disease
Named after a large outbreak of the disease occurred in Lyme and Old Lyme, Connecticut in the 1970s.

  • Ross River Fever
Named after a mosquito found to cause the disease in the Ross River of Queensland, Australia by the 1960s. The first major outbreak occurred in 1928.

  • Omsk Hemorrhagic Fever
Named after its 1940s discovery in Omsk, Russia.

  • Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Named in 1976 for the Ebola River in Zaire located in central Africa.

  • Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)
Also known as “camel flu,” MERS was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and all cases are linked to those who traveled to the Middle Eastern peninsula.

  • Valley Fever
Valley Fever earned its nickname from a 1930s outbreak San Joaquin Valley of California, though its first case came from Argentina.

  • Marburg Virus Disease
Named after Marburg, Germany in 1967.

  • Norovirus
Named after Norwalk, Ohio after an outbreak in 1968.

  • Zika Fever
First discovered in 1947 and named after the Zika Forest in Uganda.

  • Japanese Encephalitis
Named after its first case in Japan in 1871.

  • German Measles
Named after the German doctors who first described it in the 18th century. The disease is also sometimes referred to as “Rubella.”

  • Spanish Flu
While the true origins of the Spanish Flu remain unknown, the disease earned its name after Spain began to report deaths from the flu in its newspapers.

  • Lassa Fever
Named after the being found in Lassa, Nigeria in 1969.

  • Legionnaire’s Disease
Named in 1976 following an outbreak of people contracting the lung infection after attending an American Legion convention in Philadelphia.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
How does it hurt? The reality is what it is...historically diseases were named predominantly based on location of origin. Not sure why for this one, we need it addressed differently. I personally do not care one iota what people call it. Just not opposed or offended either way

It hurts by fuelling the kind of bigotry Asian people are already experiencing because of the virus. It also hurts by obfuscating the global nature of the crisis. Whatever its origins, the pandemic now belongs to the whole world.

Yes, naming conventions were different in the past, but so were many things. We can and should learn from history. The WHO’s guidelines on this were revised in 2015, long before the new coronavirus. Their reasoning was and remains extremely sound:
“In recent years, several new human infectious diseases have emerged. The use of names such as ‘swine flu’ and ‘Middle East Respiratory Syndrome’ has had unintended negative impacts by stigmatizing certain communities or economic sectors,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, Assistant Director-General for Health Security, WHO. “This may seem like a trivial issue to some, but disease names really do matter to the people who are directly affected. We’ve seen certain disease names provoke a backlash against members of particular religious or ethnic communities, create unjustified barriers to travel, commerce and trade, and trigger needless slaughtering of food animals. This can have serious consequences for peoples’ lives and livelihoods.”​
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
It hurts by fuelling the kind of bigotry Asian people are already experiencing because of the virus. It also hurts by obfuscating the global nature of the crisis. Whatever its origins, the pandemic now belongs to the whole world.

Yes, naming conventions were different in the past, but so were many things. We can and should learn from history. The WHO’s guidelines on this were revised in 2015, long before the new coronavirus. Their reasoning was and remains extremely sound:
“In recent years, several new human infectious diseases have emerged. The use of names such as ‘swine flu’ and ‘Middle East Respiratory Syndrome’ has had unintended negative impacts by stigmatizing certain communities or economic sectors,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, Assistant Director-General for Health Security, WHO. “This may seem like a trivial issue to some, but disease names really do matter to the people who are directly affected. We’ve seen certain disease names provoke a backlash against members of particular religious or ethnic communities, create unjustified barriers to travel, commerce and trade, and trigger needless slaughtering of food animals. This can have serious consequences for peoples’ lives and livelihoods.”​
It fuels bigotry to those that are bigots and those that will remain bigots. Changing a name will not change their behavior and beliefs. Sometimes, you can't fix stupid.

Granted, naming schemes can change, yet, we still use the "offensive" versions for the diseases listed above

Again, I have no stake in the name, but believe people can refer to it as they wish.
 
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