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Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

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Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Depends on how you do it, if you pull it down and don’t cover your mouth it defeats the purpose, if you sneeze into your hand or arm it’s probably doing a much better job of preventing germs from spreading into the air than the average mask would have. I always cough and sneeze into my shoulder, keeps my hands free of germs.

I often work in a casino concert venue and it drove me crazy when people would pull down their mask to yell over the music, that’s one time it was really needed. More than once I’ve used hand sanitizer on my face after being covered in screaming spittle. That’s one thing I will miss about masks, that and decreasing the smell of cigarette smoke… that’s probably it though.
I would wear a mask next time at the gaming tables in Vegas. I don't need to be distracted / breathing in someone's cigarette smoke blowing in my face. Last time I was at House of Blues at Disney Springs I smelled like smoke and didn't even smoke.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
I understand that some people - as you and JoeCamel illustrate - do or did.
But I seriously doubt that most people - the vast majority of people - who entered say a store a place where they weren't planning on spending hours, had any more masks on them than the one they were wearing.
I would think if one asked a cast member at guest relations for example one would get an extra mask. Similar if one goes First Aid at the parks, ask and you can get free Tylenol.
 

helenabear

Premium Member
I understand that some people - as you and JoeCamel illustrate - do or did.
But I seriously doubt that most people - the vast majority of people - who entered say a store a place where they weren't planning on spending hours, had any more masks on them than the one they were wearing.
I don't disagree. Keep in mind I did a lot of work in schools with mask mandates. Having extras was smart. Being someone who carries a hand bag, it's easy to have a half a dozen on hand (or more). A bunch in the car too. I'm just one of those people though who has extra stuff if needed.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
I don't disagree. Keep in mind I did a lot of work in schools with mask mandates. Having extras was smart. Being someone who carries a hand bag, it's easy to have a half a dozen on hand (or more). A bunch in the car too. I'm just one of those people though who has extra stuff if needed.
Right, I'd carry spares in WDW because a trip there lasts for hours.
I'm referring to the average foray into a supermarket, big box store, gym...
 

Bob Harlem

Well-Known Member
Hey, remember how people were saying that Omicron wasn't too worrisome because it was less lethal, but, at the same time, completely ignored just how much more contagious it was, giving it a much greater chance to wreak havoc than Delta? Well...

The Omicron wave accounts for many more U.S. deaths than Delta’s.

I think that report is mixing way too much Delta in with omicron and counting it as Omicron, omicron wave was much quicker and the fact it doesn't jive with data from India at all. And with omicron's spread being so high with vs from is a big question which isn't answered here either.
 

mmascari

Well-Known Member
Illustrates how silly some of the idea of mask wearing has always been.
Do we really expect people who cough, to expel it into their mask? Who is going to want that mask against their face?
There were a number of times when my nose ran (kind of prone to it in winter when I go from the cold outside to a warm building) and I had to wipe it.
What was I to do?
If my nose was running, I had to pull down the mask to wipe it.
Many times.

I understand that some people - as you and JoeCamel illustrate - do or did.
But I seriously doubt that most people - the vast majority of people - who entered say a store a place where they weren't planning on spending hours, had any more masks on them than the one they were wearing.
Ignore the mask for a second. In the same scenario what do you wipe your nose with?

Bare hands, sleeve, tissue, napkin, something else?

Then, after, what do you do?

Just continue on as if nothing? Dispose of the item, hand sanitizer, wash hands, something else?

Since you know it’s likely, are you prepared to repeat multiple times?

I assume you’re not using your hand and then just ignoring afterwards. Which means you’re prepared for the event and have a plan. A mask doesn’t change that at all. It’s just different preparation.

Is everyone always prepared vs having to adjust, nope. But they just deal with it then. The mask changes nothing.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
Ignore the mask for a second. In the same scenario what do you wipe your nose with?

Bare hands, sleeve, tissue, napkin, something else?

Then, after, what do you do?

Just continue on as if nothing? Dispose of the item, hand sanitizer, wash hands, something else?

Since you know it’s likely, are you prepared to repeat multiple times?

I assume you’re not using your hand and then just ignoring afterwards. Which means you’re prepared for the event and have a plan. A mask doesn’t change that at all. It’s just different preparation.

Is everyone always prepared vs having to adjust, nope. But they just deal with it then. The mask changes nothing.
I always carry a tissue, as my nose is prone to running after temperature changes from a cold outdoors to a warm indoors.
But my point wasn't about me, or the extra careful people here who carry multiple masks on them.
It was about the average person making the average trip of average duration into a store.
The vast majority of them aren't (weren't) likely to have any mask on them beyond the one that they were wearing.
Most people making a short outing into a store weren't making "a plan" of an emergency mask.
 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
Hey, remember how people were saying that Omicron wasn't too worrisome because it was less lethal, but, at the same time, completely ignored just how much more contagious it was, giving it a much greater chance to wreak havoc than Delta? Well...

The Omicron wave accounts for many more U.S. deaths than Delta’s.


I can't read it so just asking because I'm truly curious - are they counting apples to apples? Number of cases/death -% for Delta and numbers of cases/deaths-% for Omicron and Omicron comes out higher using those variables?
 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
Of course they aren't, numbers lie - but they make great headlines.

Well any deaths aren't good and it does seem like there is a lot more. I'm just trying to figure out if it's just because of sheer volume of people getting Omicron that it seems like it's more deadly than Delta, or if apples to apples, it just really is more deadly than Delta.

I'm not sure I'm making sense.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
Well any deaths aren't good and it does seem like there is a lot more. I'm just trying to figure out if it's just because of sheer volume of people getting Omicron that it seems like it's more deadly than Delta, or if apples to apples, it just really is more deadly than Delta.

I'm not sure I'm making sense.
You're making sense.
It must be sheer volume.
As usual, our basic media as well as our local and national officials have been elusive in giving us the details of who is affected and why.
 
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MisterPenguin

🐧🐧Pfizer x2 🐧🐧🐧Moderna 2+bi🐧
Premium Member
I can't read it so just asking because I'm truly curious - are they counting apples to apples? Number of cases/death -% for Delta and numbers of cases/deaths-% for Omicron and Omicron comes out higher using those variables?
The Omicron wave is breaking, but deaths, which lag cases by as much as several weeks, have surpassed the numbers from the Delta wave and are still increasing in much of the country.
In 14 states, the average daily death toll is higher now than it was two weeks ago. They are Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Maine, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.
Since Nov. 24, when South Africa first reported the Omicron variant to the World Health Organization, the United States has confirmed more than 30,163,600 new infections and more than 154,750 new deaths. (While the U.S. did not initially identify any Omicron cases within its borders until Dec. 1, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has since confirmed that the variant was in the country at least a week earlier.)
By comparison, from Aug. 1 to Oct. 31, a similar duration covering the worst of the Delta surge in the United States, the country confirmed 10,917,590 new infections and 132,616 new deaths.
That makes the official case count about 176 percent higher during the Omicron wave than in the equivalent-length Delta period. (The true case count is higher still, because, more so than during the Delta wave, many people have been using at-home tests whose results are not included in government statistics.) The death toll during the Omicron wave is about 17 percent higher so far than the death toll in the Delta wave.
On one hand, the gap between the increase in cases and the increase in deaths reflects Omicron’s somewhat lower virulence compared with previous variants, as well as that Omicron is far more likely to cause breakthrough infections in vaccinated people, who are far less likely to die from it than unvaccinated people. Deaths also remain lower than in last winter’s surge, before vaccines were widely available: 233,102 deaths were reported from Nov. 24, 2020, to Feb. 18, 2021, compared with 154,757 from Nov. 24, 2021, to Feb. 18, 2022.
But the painful absolute numbers — more than 150,000 Americans dead who would otherwise have lived — underscore the country’s continuing vulnerability. Many disabled or chronically ill people remain at high risk even after vaccination. And when the number of infections is as astronomical as 30 million, even a tiny death rate will mean a catastrophic death count.
Nationally, deaths have begun to decline and are down 13 percent from two weeks ago. But an average of about 2,300 people — more than the death toll of Hurricane Katrina — are still dying every day.
 
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