Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

helenabear

Premium Member
If it was going on I didn’t hear about it or know about it. I actually called my mom who just turned 80 and she thought I was joking with her when I asked her. She said she never knew anyone that did that. It must have been rare and maybe in certain parts of the world but not in our area.
I know of relatives or friends of friends who did but no one I knew. I do think it happened for some.

I edited my post to add something that suggests there's a transatlantic difference at play here.

Sorry to hear about your friend, but glad it's mild!
I just saw the article. It baffles me why the UK was so dragging (? Not sure that's the word I want but go with it) on chicken pox vaccination. I definitely had no choice in vaccinating my kid but I would've anyway if anything for me. I do like that my risk is different for shingles and at the moment maybe a third dose of chicken pox is all I need. Anyway tangent here but I'm with you, I think chicken pox for kids is a different ball game as a whole vs covid. While as a triple vaxxed adult I don't have much fear actually of getting covid, I don't push for that either.

Thanks for the well wishes for my friend. They're all about being in the interest of honesty and I appreciate hearing their story. Just like my friend with sick covid baby. These are realities to listen to. Better for me than faceless names to me.

Oddly the friend who has the baby - a friend of that friend shared their family's unvaccinated issues. Unsure of omicron or delta but they lost one of their elders (being vague I don't know this person to ask if I can be specific) and most adults probably 30-40s based on pics were very bad off and hospitalized. This is why I continue to push for vaccines.
 
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Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
With chickenpox, back in the day before the vaccine,, when 1 kid in the circle of friends came down with chickenpox, the circle of friends would all get together with the goal of infecting the uninfected. Kind of forced herd immunity
And a small but not insignificant number of kids (considering that exposure was nearly universal) would develop pneumonia, hepatitis, myocarditis or encephalitis. Hence, vaccination as a better path to herd immunity than "pox parties".
 

matt9112

Well-Known Member
What rules are put in place by governments and private businesses and what people actually do are often two very different things.

As a rule people listen to authority figures....its scientifically proven. Your grasping at straws. In reality nyc shut itself down for months on end.
 

matt9112

Well-Known Member
There is in places, the suggestion of a circuit breaker. Instead of expecting businesses to power through their labor issues, shut most things down for two weeks. It wouldn’t just be to stop the spread but it would be a byproduct. But more to keep things functioning at a level where everyone doesn’t quit because they are overworked. Let the government cover payroll for the 2 weeks.

But we won’t do that.

We shouldn't do that....less you still think inflation is transitory. Was hillarious to see the fed walk that term back when they realized....uhhh i guess money printers go brrrr.

The fed has no more tools in the tool box. They cant print more money and they can't lower interest rates. They HAVE to let rates rise and cool this off yet doing so is going to take all the steam out of the economy. Theres really nothing they can do to fight inflation atm.
 

Bullseye1967

Is that who I am?
Premium Member
How do you get something this wrong? Someone is getting fired!

The CDC significantly reduced its estimate for how prevalent the omicron variant of COVID-19 was in the United States earlier in December, saying on Tuesday that the omicron variant was responsible for 22.5% of all new cases for the week ending December 18 after previously saying the omicron variant was responsible for 73.2% of all new cases for the same week.

For the week ending Dec. 25, the agency says omicron accounted for 58.6% of all new cases.
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
How do you get something this wrong? Someone is getting fired!

The CDC significantly reduced its estimate for how prevalent the omicron variant of COVID-19 was in the United States earlier in December, saying on Tuesday that the omicron variant was responsible for 22.5% of all new cases for the week ending December 18 after previously saying the omicron variant was responsible for 73.2% of all new cases for the same week.

For the week ending Dec. 25, the agency says omicron accounted for 58.6% of all new cases.
I guess somebody forgot to carry the 1?

Crazy to be off by that much. They may as well have picked a random number.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
This isn't the seasonal flu, as anyone with any sense must surely realise by now.

There is no good reason (other than medical exemption) not to get the vaccine. Not one.
Did you read the post I replied to?
"We don't do this for other illnesses, we intervene to keep people healthy."
So, how do we intervene with seasonal flu?
We offer flu shots.
That's it.
It's "another illness."
It kills tens of thousands in the US.
I think it's foolish not to get a covid vaccine, or any other vaccine for something a person is at risk for.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
Not in my circle. As a 44 year old I have actually been vaccinated for chicken pox. Never had it and as I got older the fear of being bad off was real.

It can cause death and hospitalization. Hence my comment above.
I never had chickenpox either, and therefore got vaccinated against chickenpox years ago as well.
 

helenabear

Premium Member
I never had chickenpox either, and therefore got vaccinated against chickenpox years ago as well.
Not to derail too much, but curious - did you have any struggles getting it? My PCP at the time was a heart specialist and didn't have easy access to it at the time. Took a while to convince him too but finally got a script and called around to clinics. Found only one who would vaccinate me as an adult.
 

networkpro

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
How do you get something this wrong? Someone is getting fired!

The CDC significantly reduced its estimate for how prevalent the omicron variant of COVID-19 was in the United States earlier in December, saying on Tuesday that the omicron variant was responsible for 22.5% of all new cases for the week ending December 18 after previously saying the omicron variant was responsible for 73.2% of all new cases for the same week.

For the week ending Dec. 25, the agency says omicron accounted for 58.6% of all new cases.

And if you look at the distribution of identified variant infections, you'll see that Omicron isn't ubiquitous, it's concentrated in where it appeared.
 

JoeCamel

Well-Known Member
This was (is?) a thing—he isn't making it up. When I was growing up in the UK, I remember it being considered normal and good when you caught chicken pox from other children, because it meant you finally had it out of the way. I didn't even know there was a vaccine until well into adulthood.

Still, none of this has any bearing on COVID.

ETA: Note the date of this article, which suggests that chickenpox parties are far from unusual in the UK:


If it was going on I didn’t hear about it or know about it. I actually called my mom who just turned 80 and she thought I was joking with her when I asked her. She said she never knew anyone that did that. It must have been rare and maybe in certain parts of the world but not in our area.

I never had chickenpox either, and therefore got vaccinated against chickenpox years ago as well.

Not to derail too much, but curious - did you have any struggles getting it? My PCP at the time was a heart specialist and didn't have easy access to it at the time. Took a while to convince him too but finally got a script and called around to clinics. Found only one who would vaccinate me as an adult.
I am older so I had the pox, it puts me at risk of developing shingles and the vaccine reduces that chance.
This is the reason for the vaccine and the pox parties were active in the late 70's early 80's. I remember them being a thing and wondered why would you want your kid to go through the itching and scarring with the risk of shingles later in life?
People get weird notions that can hurt in ways they never imagined

 
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Calmdownnow

Well-Known Member
And if you look at the distribution of identified variant infections, you'll see that Omicron isn't ubiquitous, it's concentrated in where it appeared.
Internationally, the U.S. is notorious for being very poor at the type of testing required to routinely identify variants. Your data only reflects the fact that in some locations testing of variants in the labs is OK, whereas in most places, it is bad. So this distribution data you refer to tells you nothing about how "ubiquitous" the variant is. The problem in the U.S. is that the "private sector" is doing the testing and unless they are paid a premium, they have no incentive to generate accurate variant data.

Just to add: The testing on white tailed deer at nine sites in Ohio, that (pre Omicron) found 3 different COVID variants in more than a third of live deer, was more comprehensive in testing for variants than the general testing of human Americans for variants. There has been little discussion in main stream media about how these variants are being transmitted in the deer population, but the first thoughts are via the water supply.
 
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helenabear

Premium Member
I am older so I had the pox, it puts me at risk of developing shingles and the vaccine reduces that chance.
This is the reason for the vaccine and the pox parties were active in the late 70's early 80's. I remember them being a thing and wondered why would you want your kid to go through the itching and scarring with the risk of shingles later in life?
People get weird notions that can hurt in ways they never imagined

I was born in the 70s and a kid of the 80s as an FYI. i just never had chicken pox. My spouse did though. After a third person I knew my age going to the hospital with chickenpox as an adult, I went and got vaccinated. So I'm very much of the generation that was around for those decades. Just we never had pox parties where I lived. My mom felt like you and never dreamt of doing it. It was something I heard of, but none of my friends ever took part of. I do remember when each of my best friends was sick with it though. Last one 6th grade with a 3 year gap. By even 3rd grade most had had it. I was just the exception. So far now I've been told no to shingles vaccine. Unfortunately being 40s makes me more of an oddball with what to do next.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Did you read the post I replied to?
"We don't do this for other illnesses, we intervene to keep people healthy."
So, how do we intervene with seasonal flu?
We offer flu shots.
That's it.
It's "another illness."
It kills tens of thousands in the US.
I think it's foolish not to get a covid vaccine, or any other vaccine for something a person is at risk for.
So you’re insisting on a pedantic reading of my post rather than a sincere one. My point was perfectly clear. I don’t have time for silly semantic games.
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
How do you get something this wrong? Someone is getting fired!

The CDC significantly reduced its estimate for how prevalent the omicron variant of COVID-19 was in the United States earlier in December, saying on Tuesday that the omicron variant was responsible for 22.5% of all new cases for the week ending December 18 after previously saying the omicron variant was responsible for 73.2% of all new cases for the same week.

For the week ending Dec. 25, the agency says omicron accounted for 58.6% of all new cases.
Since Omicron has been shown to be less fatal thus not the boogy man it was initially planned, we need to return the emphasis to the known boogeyman man, Delta.
 

mmascari

Well-Known Member
Did you read the post I replied to?
"We don't do this for other illnesses, we intervene to keep people healthy."
So, how do we intervene with seasonal flu?
We offer flu shots.
That's it.
It's "another illness."
It kills tens of thousands in the US.
I think it's foolish not to get a covid vaccine, or any other vaccine for something a person is at risk for.
COVID is not the flu though.

COVID kills tens of tens of thousands.

400,000 not 40,000. That extra digit changes a lot of public health policy.
 

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