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Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

helenabear

Well-Known Member
The sad thing is that many people will look at this sweet child and say "well, she was overweight, so that can't happen to my kid." I keep hearing excuses like that for every child who has died or has covid complications. Or "well, it's so rare."

Yes, the rate of death and rate of complications is still small for children, but it's growing. Of course we can't keep children in a bubble. But we can get vaccinated and wear masks and socially distance and keep kids in pods to prevent spread. Who knows what could come, or not, in future variants.
I almost didn't post about my loved one's friend for that reason. Even still it didn't garner as much sympathy. The kid is still fighting for his life a month after catching covid. Other kids are suffering too. A classmate missed an important head injury diagnosis because the hospital wait times were so long.

So it trickles down. If we can just vaccinate when possible, we'll be better off eventually. Not surprisingly low vaccination rates in adults lead to higher covid rates in children https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-per...d-covid-hospital-cases-low-vaccination-states
 

Andrew C

You know what's funny?
The sad thing is that many people will look at this sweet child and say "well, she was overweight, so that can't happen to my kid." I keep hearing excuses like that for every child who has died or has covid complications. Or "well, it's so rare."

Yes, the rate of death and rate of complications is still small for children, but it's growing. Of course we can't keep children in a bubble. But we can get vaccinated and wear masks and socially distance and keep kids in pods to prevent spread. Who knows what could come, or not, in future variants.
Why can't all that be discussed?
  • It is tragic that this child died. It is hard to even imagine what these parents are going through. Impossible really.
  • It seems whatever happened at the school needs to be determined.
  • Child deaths due to COVID are very rare, but as this case shows, they can still occur. Nothing is 100%
  • If more adults stepped up and got vaccinated, we could reduce spread and prevent some of these instances from occurring. This is where I personally put much of the blame (without knowing what occurred specifically at school). I bolded this for a reason. It is probably the easiest thing to do to protect yourself, your family, others...and children. Drives me crazy.
  • Delta spreads more easily among children (and everyone really) than alpha. The good news here is that it is declining across most of the country, at least for now.
  • According to the CDC, childhood obesity does make a child much more susceptible to severe illness. It is an underlying condition. It doesn't make this case any less tragic, and it doesn't excuse her death or automatically mean, "well, if she didn't have this issue, she would most certainly be alive today. But it is reality of illness whether we like to admit it or not.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Why can't all that be discussed?
  • It is tragic that this child died. It is hard to even imagine what these parents are going through. Impossible really.
  • It seems whatever happened at the school needs to be determined.
  • Child deaths due to COVID are very rare, but as this case shows, they can still occur. Nothing is 100%
  • If more adults stepped up and got vaccinated, we could reduce spread and prevent some of these instances from occurring. This is where I personally put much of the blame (without knowing what occurred specifically at school). I bolded this for a reason. It is probably the easiest thing to do to protect yourself, your family, others...and children. Drives me crazy.
  • Delta spreads more easily among children (and everyone really) than alpha. The good news here is that it is declining across most of the country, at least for now.
  • According to the CDC, childhood obesity does make a child much more susceptible to severe illness. It is an underlying condition. It doesn't make this case any less tragic, and it doesn't excuse her death or automatically mean, "well, if she didn't have this issue, she would most certainly be alive today. But it is reality of illness whether we like to admit it or not.
The original article said she had no underlying medical conditions. Because someone isn’t skinny doesn‘t mean they are obese.
 

Andrew C

You know what's funny?
The original article said she had no underlying medical conditions. Because someone isn’t skinny doesn‘t mean they are obese.
That’s what the parents said, yes. I get that. I don’t want to get into a back and forth about it too much. A child is dead. I was just responding to someone’s post who brought up the topic.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
Why can't all that be discussed?
  • It is tragic that this child died. It is hard to even imagine what these parents are going through. Impossible really.
  • It seems whatever happened at the school needs to be determined.
  • Child deaths due to COVID are very rare, but as this case shows, they can still occur. Nothing is 100%
  • If more adults stepped up and got vaccinated, we could reduce spread and prevent some of these instances from occurring. This is where I personally put much of the blame (without knowing what occurred specifically at school). I bolded this for a reason. It is probably the easiest thing to do to protect yourself, your family, others...and children. Drives me crazy.
  • Delta spreads more easily among children (and everyone really) than alpha. The good news here is that it is declining across most of the country, at least for now.
  • According to the CDC, childhood obesity does make a child much more susceptible to severe illness. It is an underlying condition. It doesn't make this case any less tragic, and it doesn't excuse her death or automatically mean, "well, if she didn't have this issue, she would most certainly be alive today. But it is reality of illness whether we like to admit it or not.
All of these things can and should be discussed. But it's frustrating when you live in an area where people are actively protesting against vaccinations, trying to prevent schools from having mask requirements (forget discussions about keeping kids in pods), and refuse to politely socially distance. I'm tired of people in my own community making excuses for why people's deaths don't matter and why we shouldn't change our lives to prevent more of them.
 

Andrew C

You know what's funny?
All of these things can and should be discussed. But it's frustrating when you live in an area where people are actively protesting against vaccinations, trying to prevent schools from having mask requirements (forget discussions about keeping kids in pods), and refuse to politely socially distance. I'm tired of people in my own community making excuses for why people's deaths don't matter and why we shouldn't change our lives to prevent more of them.
Understood.
 

macefamily

Well-Known Member
I was very disappointed during our trip two weeks ago. Disney is back to the old monorail policies. "Please move all the way down to the fence..." Our car was crammed with 16 people with no more plastic protective barriers. I didn't like the pre-Covid Disney policy of loading the monorail. I thought they always stuffed people in the cars, but now it's not safe.
 

sullyinMT

Well-Known Member
Why can't all that be discussed?
  • It is tragic that this child died. It is hard to even imagine what these parents are going through. Impossible really.
  • It seems whatever happened at the school needs to be determined.
  • Child deaths due to COVID are very rare, but as this case shows, they can still occur. Nothing is 100%
  • If more adults stepped up and got vaccinated, we could reduce spread and prevent some of these instances from occurring. This is where I personally put much of the blame (without knowing what occurred specifically at school). I bolded this for a reason. It is probably the easiest thing to do to protect yourself, your family, others...and children. Drives me crazy.
  • Delta spreads more easily among children (and everyone really) than alpha. The good news here is that it is declining across most of the country, at least for now.
  • According to the CDC, childhood obesity does make a child much more susceptible to severe illness. It is an underlying condition. It doesn't make this case any less tragic, and it doesn't excuse her death or automatically mean, "well, if she didn't have this issue, she would most certainly be alive today. But it is reality of illness whether we like to admit it or not.
To your bolder point, I’m frankly disgusted that the WH didn’t announce intentions to tie dept of education funds to teacher/staff vaccination requirements.

Just as the argument was made that patients and their families deserve to know their care team is vaccinated, so too parents with respect to school staff. While vaccines are under EUA or unavailable to students depending on age, masks are their best line of defense. For adults, they have a fully approved and much better alternative in vaccination.
 

Andrew C

You know what's funny?
I was very disappointed during our trip two weeks ago. Disney is back to the old monorail policies. "Please move all the way down to the fence..." Our car was crammed with 16 people with no more plastic protective barriers. I didn't like the pre-Covid Disney policy of loading the monorail. I thought they always stuffed people in the cars, but now it's not safe.
At least one study had shown that plastic barriers don’t really do much, if anything. So I would say those gave people a false sense of security.
Now the amount of people in one cab may be another story. So I can’t really comment
 

Andrew C

You know what's funny?
To your bolder point, I’m frankly disgusted that the WH didn’t announce intentions to tie dept of education funds to teacher/staff vaccination requirements.

Just as the argument was made that patients and their families deserve to know their care team is vaccinated, so too parents with respect to school staff. While vaccines are under EUA or unavailable to students depending on age, masks are their best line of defense. For adults, they have a fully approved and much better alternative in vaccination.
All I can say is the feds are typically careful in getting involved in public schools considering most of that power lives with states. I am personally for states implementing these mandates at schools.
 

sullyinMT

Well-Known Member
All I can say is the feds are typically careful in getting involved in public schools considering most of that power lives with states. I am personally for states implementing these mandates at schools.
I agree with you fully, it should lie within the state. Even Newsom has left it to individual CA districts but with ties to the state purse for noncompliance with the new student mandates recently announced. Likewise, the federal purse can be used as a tool.

I agree that a lot of the power within schools lies at the state or even more granular, but federal standards in lunch programs, ADA compliance, youth protection, and minimum education standards already exist.
 

mf1972

Well-Known Member
I was very disappointed during our trip two weeks ago. Disney is back to the old monorail policies. "Please move all the way down to the fence..." Our car was crammed with 16 people with no more plastic protective barriers. I didn't like the pre-Covid Disney policy of loading the monorail. I thought they always stuffed people in the cars, but now it's not safe.
how about the busses? are they picking people in like sardines again?
 

DCBaker

Premium Member
"Florida on Tuesday reported 3,598 more COVID-19 cases and three deaths to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to Miami Herald calculations of CDC data.

In all, Florida has recorded at least 3,590,400 confirmed COVID cases and 55,622 deaths since the pandemic began.

In the past seven days the state has added, on average, 222 deaths and 4,321 cases per day, according to Herald calculations of CDC data."

"There were 4,847 people hospitalized for COVID-19 in Florida, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Tuesday report. This data is reported from 232 Florida hospitals. That is 259 fewer patients than Monday’s report, but also from 25 fewer hospitals than the 257 that reported on Monday. This continues a trend of decreasing hospitalizations.

COVID-19 patients take up 8.55% of all inpatient beds in the latest report’s hospitals, compared to 8.5% in the previous day’s reporting hospitals.

Of the people hospitalized in Florida, 1,235 people were in intensive care unit beds, a decrease of 72. That represents about 19.30% of the state’s ICU hospital beds compared to 20.6% the previous day."

 

Epcotfan21

Well-Known Member
That People article left quite a bit out regarding what that child allegedly had to go through.

I have a problem with the parents suggesting that their child died because of other parents that sent their sick kids to school. While that likely was the cause as to how she was infected, it's extremely difficult to be a parent with kids in any sort of school right now.

Fact of the matter is kids get sick...constantly. Also most kids with Delta have runny noses and coughs, basically the two most common symptoms of any virus. So the options are to test your child every time they have a runny nose and/or cough, which is probably the right thing to do in this environment, but also not ideal or realistic to most Americans.

We had a situation at my son's school during the height of Delta here in Florida, where a mom was not feeling well and dropped her kids off at school fully knowing that after she dropped them off, she was going to get a covid test. The mom tested positive, waited till after school was finished to pick up the kids and then took both of them to get tested too. Both kids also tested positive. In this situation, the parent acted selfishly and their behavior was extremely reckless. But if your child hasn't been around other sick friends/family members or wasn't knowingly exposed to someone that has tested positive for Covid, it's hard to blame parents that send their kid to school with a runny nose/cough and ultimately not knowing that the child may have Covid. JMHO.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Wasn't saying anything by the picture.

Obese, as defined by the CDC, is a BMI over 30.
Who said it isn’t. The specific comment was made that as part of the discussion around this girl’s death there should be a discussion around how obesity is a risk factor for severe covid but the parents said she had no underlying conditions so while obesity being a high risk factor is true it doesn’t appear to be relevant in this case. Nowhere was anyone disputing what the definition of obesity is.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I have a problem with the parents suggesting that their child died because of other parents that sent their sick kids to school. While that likely was the cause as to how she was infected, it's extremely difficult to be a parent with kids in any sort of school right now.

Fact of the matter is kids get sick...constantly. Also most kids with Delta have runny noses and coughs, basically the two most common symptoms of any virus. So the options are to test your child every time they have a runny nose and/or cough, which is probably the right thing to do in this environment, but also not ideal or realistic to most Americans.

We had a situation at my son's school during the height of Delta here in Florida, where a mom was not feeling well and dropped her kids off at school fully knowing that after she dropped them off, she was going to get a covid test. The mom tested positive, waited till after school was finished to pick up the kids and then took both of them to get tested too. Both kids also tested positive. In this situation, the parent acted selfishly and their behavior was extremely reckless. But if your child hasn't been around other sick friends/family members or wasn't knowingly exposed to someone that has tested positive for Covid, it's hard to blame parents that send their kid to school with a runny nose/cough and ultimately not knowing that the child may have Covid. JMHO.
When a kid has symptoms that could be covid it seems like a terrible practice to have a 10 year old walk the sick kid to the nurse and if they get sent home have her go back to the classroom to gather their belongings. The district said their policy is an adult should accompany a kid to the nurse so if the allegation is true then they are violating their own policy. I didn’t see where the parents blamed other parents for sending a sick kid to school. I thought their beef was with the teacher.
 

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