Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

SteveAZee

Well-Known Member
My God.. what has happened to people using common sense for themselves, if an Anti Vaxxer decides what is right for him, then he is "taking the chance" that others may not -- and that's ok, isnt it? If you are someone who is TRULY afraid of getting Covid, and vaccinated, then wear a mask, dont shake hands, keep sanitizer with you, wear gloves, whatever you need to do for yourself...Is amazing to me how those who DO GET VACCINATED, want to cuss and badmouth those who dont want to get vaccinated, for whatever reason.
Some/many hospitals are overrun with COVID patients. If I get into a car accident (for example) and need medical care, I may not be able to get it, or perhaps get it from exhausted medical workers. Elective surgery is postponed indefinitely, so people who are in pain but in theory can wait for medical care will have to wait.

Supply chains have been affected by sick or dying workers, or the need to quarantine to prevent further spread. Prices spike.

Those are a couple of selfish reasons why just allowing the disease to run rampant among the unvaccinated seems bad.
 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
So I was reading something last night. The big fear of hospitals being overrun is of course being denied treatment if you are ill, postponed surgeries, etc.

Just an ethical question for a Sunday :D - first wave, vaccines weren't available, people getting sick, etc. - this wave, vaccines ARE available and majority of hospitalized are unvaccinated - taking up the ICU beds.

How are they deciding who gets treatment and who doesn't?
I mean, are they actually turning away accident victims, heart attacks, strokes, etc.? If a patient presents to the ER according to EMTALA, patient must be at least stabilized no matter insurance status.
I realize there is no "Good" answer to this.

How does it work in Covid times? Who decides who gets to be treated?
And has it actually come to that anywhere yet?
 

bryanfze55

Well-Known Member
So I was reading something last night. The big fear of hospitals being overrun is of course being denied treatment if you are ill, postponed surgeries, etc.

Just an ethical question for a Sunday :D - first wave, vaccines weren't available, people getting sick, etc. - this wave, vaccines ARE available and majority of hospitalized are unvaccinated - taking up the ICU beds.

How are they deciding who gets treatment and who doesn't?
I mean, are they actually turning away accident victims, heart attacks, strokes, etc.? If a patient presents to the ER according to EMTALA, patient must be at least stabilized no matter insurance status.

How does it work in Covid times? Who decides who gets to be treated?
And has it actually come to that anywhere yet?
I don’t work in a hospital (so someone else please chime in), but my assumption is they won’t toss an existing COVID patient out of the window to make room for the car crash victim. Maybe they should though 😉

In reality, I’ve heard patients will just start getting moved to other areas of the hospital that have capacity. That’s not ideal, though, and is still a situation worth avoiding. It spreads resources too thin, quality of care declines, elective procedures get cancelled, etc… people who need ICU care should really be IN the ICU with the staff that are trained and equipped to care for them.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Some/many hospitals are overrun with COVID patients. If I get into a car accident (for example) and need medical care, I may not be able to get it, or perhaps get it from exhausted medical workers. Elective surgery is postponed indefinitely, so people who are in pain but in theory can wait for medical care will have to wait.

Supply chains have been affected by sick or dying workers, or the need to quarantine to prevent further spread. Prices spike.

Those are a couple of selfish reasons why just allowing the disease to run rampant among the unvaccinated seems bad.
…the wheel keeps spinning on this…

its been said probably 300 times on this thread alone. Just insanity that the defiant continue to embarrass themselves
 

hopemax

Well-Known Member
Not sure if this is a tongue in cheek? If not, McGill was founded by king George the V and is a historic campus. It’s a beautiful place in a beautiful city. UCF is ???? A massive state school founded in the 60s? Not much to look at and yeah, well, they are different
My original knowledge of McGill is from Anne of Green Gables. I don't doubt that plays a role too. I can't think of any literary characters that went to UCF.
 

Polkadotdress

Well-Known Member
So I was reading something last night. The big fear of hospitals being overrun is of course being denied treatment if you are ill, postponed surgeries, etc.

Just an ethical question for a Sunday :D - first wave, vaccines weren't available, people getting sick, etc. - this wave, vaccines ARE available and majority of hospitalized are unvaccinated - taking up the ICU beds.

How are they deciding who gets treatment and who doesn't?
I mean, are they actually turning away accident victims, heart attacks, strokes, etc.? If a patient presents to the ER according to EMTALA, patient must be at least stabilized no matter insurance status.
I realize there is no "Good" answer to this.

How does it work in Covid times? Who decides who gets to be treated?
And has it actually come to that anywhere yet?
Ambulances know in advance whether or not the hospital has capacity in the ER and what the overall hospital status is. At times, the hospital will signify “divert” status. Patients that “walk in” themselves will just continue to stack up in the waiting rooms and hallways.

A quick Google search will turn up many current accounts of both these things occurring. One article even shared an account of a gunshot victim who was admitted to the hospital, but has now been waiting 7 days to have surgery on his shoulder, since he is not prioritized “serious” enough to tie up surgical resources.
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
Ambulances know in advance whether or not the hospital has capacity in the ER and what the overall hospital status is. At times, the hospital will signify “divert” status. Patients that “walk in” themselves will just continue to stack up in the waiting rooms and hallways.

A quick Google search will turn up many current accounts of both these things occurring. One article even shared an account of a gunshot victim who was admitted to the hospital, but has now been waiting 7 days to have surgery on his shoulder, since he is not prioritized “serious” enough to tie up surgical resources.
I asked a conservative friend of mine yesterday “so what do you think should be done with hospitals filling up? Nothing?”
Her answer? - “what hospitals are filling up? Show me the data. You’re just repeating what you heard from the liberal media”
 

mmascari

Well-Known Member

What is that, 0.2% for kids? That’s practically nothing. It’s 0% after rounding.

I've been told repeatedly that we don’t need to worry about things that low. They’re nothing. Not even worth doing anything to prevent.

It’s all crap. This is likely the most earth shattering devastating thing to happen to those families. They would give anything to have those kids back.

The devastating impact is why even a low percent is concerning.
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
For all the flack that Florida gets, it’s actually middle-of-the-pack in terms of vaccination numbers. Many states are far worse. There are a lot of other factors at play. As another poster suggested, weather is a big factor. Florida is miserable in the summer and people stay inside. I believe Florida also has the second oldest population in the country, with age being the #1 risk factor for hospitalization and death from covid. It’s also a vacation/travel hotspot. The governor is far from perfect (all governors are), but a lot of other factors exist here.
The only thing Florida is "in the middle of the pack" is for fully vaccinated.

So, why do they have things so much worse? Probably the lack of other mitigation factors like no mask requirements.

Here are the states ranked by cases per 100k residents. Florida is number 3.

1629040276318.png


Here are the states ranked by hospitalizations per 100k residents. Florida is number one!
1629040365745.png


Here are the states ranked by deaths per 100K. Florida is number 4.

1629040413656.png
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
There is hope, remember the state this all started in? Missouri has appeared to have peaked a week ago.

View attachment 579834
We hope.

However, I tend to watch hospitalizations more than cases or deaths, because that's a real time number that can't be an influenced by the way the data for cases or deaths can.

Missouri may not be out the woods yet.

1629040806833.png
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
But with the rising covid surge of unvaccinated in FL, the idiot in charge is now recommending residents to take the Regeneron cocktail.
But that's not proven technology!!!!!!!! (To quote the anti-vaxxers.)

Yeah, anti-vaxxers and @Lady Liberty, if you want to sow doubt on vaccines as being "too new" and "unproven" and "having long term risks" then when you wind up in the hospital (and likely, you will), DON'T LET THEM GIVE YOU REGERON, ANTI-VAXXERS!! It's newer than the vaccines!! It's unproven!!! It might cause more harm in the long run!!! Don't accept any anti-viral treatment, it's only Emergency Use Authorization. And if EUA isn't good enough to make you feel safe enough to get the vaccine, then it certainly isn't good enough for any of the treatments for COVID.

And if they want to give you saline or put you on oxygen or on a respirator because you feel like your suffocating, say "NO!" dear anti-vaxxers. For these procedures for treating COVID are relatively new!! Who knows what harm they might cause in a reaction with your COVID (which you got and it hospitalized you because you refused vaccination)... it could be even more damaging than all that organ failure you're experiencing.

In fact, I'm surprised anyone who refused the vaccine would willingly go to a hospital for unproven COVID treatments. Remember, Fauci endorses Regeneron all those treatments for when you eventually get COVID. You can't let him win!!
 
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JoeCamel

Well-Known Member
I asked a conservative friend of mine yesterday “so what do you think should be done with hospitals filling up? Nothing?”
Her answer? - “what hospitals are filling up? Show me the data. You’re just repeating what you heard from the liberal media”
I saw a tweet from an ER nurse to the antivaxers to come share a shift in the ER with her. This crap has to stop, people are dying from it
But that's not proven technology!!!!!!!! (To quote the anti-vaxxers.

In fact, I'm surprised anyone who refused the vaccine would willingly go to a hospital for unproven COVID treatments. Remember, Fauci endorses Regeneron all those treatments for when you eventually get COVID. You can't let him win!!
But it has a cool name.......
 

monothingie

I ❤️ GLUE!
Premium Member
The only thing Florida is "in the middle of the pack" is for fully vaccinated.

So, why do they have things so much worse? Probably the lack of other mitigation factors like no mask requirements.

Here are the states ranked by cases per 100k residents. Florida is number 3.

View attachment 579934

Here are the states ranked by hospitalizations per 100k residents. Florida is number one!
View attachment 579935

Here are the states ranked by deaths per 100K. Florida is number 4.

View attachment 579936
And what you ignore is the 14 day change column. Florida rate peaked. Notice the difference between Florida and everywhere else. In 2-3 weeks you’ll have a totally different set of states experiencing this surge. It is just the progression of the virus, nothing you can do to stop it spreading. But of course to some the politics are all that matters…
 

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