Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

dreday3

Well-Known Member
My thought is that the vaccine is another piece of the puzzle. Vaccines, masks, distancing, washing hands, enhanced cleaning procedures. They are all needed.

Limiting travel helps as well, but that’s really going to make the “my freedom” group upset.

Why limit travel if you are vaccinated and follow mask guidelines of wherever you visit?

I understand if a person doesn't want to risk it, but if someone else who is vaccinated isn't as concerned about getting it and follows all the guidelines, what is the issue?
 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
Because Travel contributes to the spread of covid.

So when do you propose people can travel? There plenty of places to go that aren't hotspots but still have cases.

Get vaccinated, follow mandates/guidelines at home and where you are visiting, decide on your own risk. That's what we will do.
 

Figgy1

Premium Member
Why limit travel if you are vaccinated and follow mask guidelines of wherever you visit?

I understand if a person doesn't want to risk it, but if someone else who is vaccinated isn't as concerned about getting it and follows all the guidelines, what is the issue?
Orlando is one of the hottest spots in the country and yet there isn't a mask mandate
 

hopemax

Well-Known Member
Not to be the rain on the "if everybody would get a shot, COVID would go away" parade but I was looking at the Israel numbers. They are having quite the spike with over 70% of the population fully vaccinated.

Either Pfizer doesn't work too well (at least at preventing infections) vs. Delta or the protection starts to wear off after just a few months. Either is not a good thing and goes against the narrative that the only reason COVID still exists is the anti-vaxxers.
If 95% of the population was vaccinated, community transmission would look different than with only 70%. Just like when measles and chicken pox had high levels of natural immunity within populations, but vaccinations were needed to put it over the top for the real ability to suppress outbreaks to kick in. Delta is highly transmissible and that has a real impact on the threshold. We were told that and shown the math. But when experts said we would need numbers that high, they were accused of fear mongering to get people to be vaccinated, because people had talked themselves into thinking 60% would be good enough (since that's all people think will actually happen). Now, maybe we can put that misguided assumption to bed. But declaring that since 60-70% wasn't enough, "everybody" wouldn't be enough either is disingenuous. In no world is 60-70% "everybody."

If a boat was full of leaks, people could understand how only patching 3/4ths of the holes could very well lead to the boat still sinking. It doesn't mean the boat will continue to sink if you patch most of them. Maybe the boat still takes on water, but it might be enough to let you bail out the water to make it to shore. Some things you need to be 90% there before you start really getting ahead of something.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Not to be the rain on the "if everybody would get a shot, COVID would go away" parade but I was looking at the Israel numbers. They are having quite the spike with over 70% of the population fully vaccinated.

Either Pfizer doesn't work too well (at least at preventing infections) vs. Delta or the protection starts to wear off after just a few months. Either is not a good thing and goes against the narrative that the only reason COVID still exists is the anti-vaxxers.
Or 70% is not enough. If the vaccines stopped working why don’t we see a lot more breakthrough infections?
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
That’s the same question people use for masks and distancing. “When do you propose to end the masks and distancing”

It’s not time for those questions yet if hospitals are filling up.


This is where people taking calculated risks come more into focus.

We take calculated risks every day. Some risks are higher based on where we live. Some of us have things that put us at higher risk in general.

Some things are worth a certain level of risk to some and not to others.

I won't go into the grocery store without a mask on. I use the wipes at the front door to push my cart and open freezer doors. I limit my visits and buy more at one time. (Publix is doing the $10 off a gas card thing this weekend, so I bought a buncha stuff LOL. That ten dollars apparently factors into my risk assessment!!)

And I'm going to WDW at the end of this month, as has been planned for a long time, to celebrate my 50th and theirs. There is obviously risk there, but like everything else, we are taking steps to mitigate that risk. We are vaccinated (3-4 months, so it should still be solid protection.) We mask indoors and even outdoors if we find ourselves in a crowd (such as fireworks.) We are staying in a Ft Wilderness cabin instead of a hotel (less interaction with people.) We're limiting our park time, consciously remaining outdoors as much as possible, and we will force social distancing or not participate. (Example: if CoP is packed such that someone else is closer than two seats away from me, I'm not participating. In all the years we've been going, it's very rarely ever been that packed.)

With all that said, if there were a travel ban, fine. We'd stay home, but it's still my (milestone) birthday (and I've now outlived my Dad by 5 years) so we'd take less risk but still probably go out to eat locally, perhaps with a few friends. All different degrees of risk.

If I hit 60, I'll be the first male on my father's side to do so. I've already decided I might try some kind of drugs LOL. Calculated risk.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Not sure. I also know that travel will not be limited in the USA. But travel does contribute to the spread.
Leaving your house for any reason contributes to spread. So does seeing family and friends. It’s all a matter of taking the best precautions to limit one’s chances of getting infected. In the US breakthrough infections are still rare. The new cases reported in Orange County periodically these days are still 90%+ in unvaccinated people. Even though breakthrough infections do happen almost all of the hospitalizations and deaths are in unvaccinated people. So what’s really contributing the most to spread is people not getting vaccinated. If we had 95%+ people vaccinated nobody would need to do anything differently and in the rare case of an outbreak we would have an easy time isolating it.
 

bryanfze55

Well-Known Member

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