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News Contemporary Refurbishment--April to Sept 2021

Poseidon Quest

Well-Known Member
menu looks nice (no prices on it though which is making it scary)....the concept art is atrocious, hope it turns out better than that. not that the wave had any grand theming but this generic hilton look trend taking over every location one by one is really ruining Disney for me.

It doesn't look like much changed from The Wave though? Just the same interior with minor changes and most likely pictures of the monorail or something. I never thought The Wave's interior was great, but the food certainly was. As long as Bacon and Eggs is still on the menu and it hasn't changed, then I think the new iteration of the restaurant will be fine. Probably more expensive and that's a shame considering how great a deal The Wave was for food on Disney property, but if the core experience is kept intact, this is one of the few changes to Disney property that I'm optimistic about.
 

JohnD

Well-Known Member
It doesn't look like much changed from The Wave though? Just the same interior with minor changes and most likely pictures of the monorail or something. I never thought The Wave's interior was great, but the food certainly was. As long as Bacon and Eggs is still on the menu and it hasn't changed, then I think the new iteration of the restaurant will be fine. Probably more expensive and that's a shame considering how great a deal The Wave was for food on Disney property, but if the core experience is kept intact, this is one of the few changes to Disney property that I'm optimistic about.

There is a "Bacon and Eggs" appetizer listed for lunch and dinner at Steakhouse 71.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
Senior level interior design student quality boards. I can only presume the final product will reflect the concept art.

ETA: Will someone tell them “contemporary” doesn’t mean “modern”? Someone involved in the decision making must really like Eames furniture and googie architecture.
 

James Alucobond

Well-Known Member
ETA: Will someone tell them “contemporary” doesn’t mean “modern”? Someone involved in the decision making must really like Eames furniture and googie architecture.
I think it's just on trend now and they're trying to take advantage of the moment. Walk into any West Elm and you'll be utterly assaulted with this style.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
I think it's just on trend now and they're trying to take advantage of the moment. Walk into any West Elm and you'll be utterly assaulted with this style.
I had to Google West Elm as I’ve never heard of it. Is the fact a rustic-retro-modern style furniture store misinterpreted the difference between modern art/design and contemporary art/design excuse Disney from also doing so?

If Disney followed the trends the CR wouldn’t even exist.
 

TrojanUSC

Well-Known Member
Senior level interior design student quality boards. I can only presume the final product will reflect the concept art.

ETA: Will someone tell them “contemporary” doesn’t mean “modern”? Someone involved in the decision making must really like Eames furniture and googie architecture.

The concept art looks mid-century modern, which is what they are going for all over there.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
The concept art looks mid-century modern, which is what they are going for all over there.
I didn’t think I needed to be that specific when I mentioned the Eames chair, as they are arguably the most well known icon of mid-century modernism.

I personally don’t think it fits the theme of a “contemporary” resort, but perhaps I’m being pedantic or quibbling. I will just disregard the words used to describe the various themed experiences/resorts.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
So far it's very retro-modern. Which is what I always assumed the vision for CR was/is.
I find it to be at the intersection of modern and postmodern architecture. While a brutalist concrete structure, it’s also a comically oversized A-frame, lending itself to reading as a historical reference. Bit of a different discussion.

You’re probably right. That very well may be the intent. It may have been all along. Maybe I just misinterpreted the intended theme based on the name of the resort and it opening at the tail end of the modernist movement.
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
I didn’t think I needed to be that specific when I mentioned the Eames chair, as they are arguably the most well known icon of mid-century modernism.

I personally don’t think it fits the theme of a “contemporary” resort, but perhaps I’m being pedantic or quibbling. I will just disregard the words used to describe the various themed experiences/resorts.
It was contemporary when it was built!!




 

dreday3

Well-Known Member
I find it to be at the intersection of modern and postmodern architecture. While a brutalist concrete structure, it’s also a comically oversized A-frame, lending itself to reading as a historical reference. Bit of a different discussion.

You’re probably right. That very well may be the intent. It may have been all along. Maybe I just misinterpreted the intended theme based on the name of the resort and it opening at the tail end of the modernist movement.

I guess I never thought about it that much. 😂

I'll defer to your opinion.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
I said as much in the next post.
Maybe I just misinterpreted the intended theme based on the name of the resort and it opening at the tail end of the modernist movement.
And so it went from being “contemporary” then to being “retro-futuristic-modern” today. That’s fine. I have no dog in the fight of what it should be. I guess I’m just now realizing I didn’t have the same reading of the theme/building that most do and perhaps that Disney themselves do as well.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
I guess I never thought about it that much. 😂

I'll defer to your opinion.
I seem to be very much in the minority when it comes to giving themed environments and experiences a thorough and rigorous contemplation within the overall historical context of art, design and architecture, but that’s ok. I enjoy placing theme parks and such in a greater framework and viewing them as art you experience and critiquing the results as one would any other work of art.

Some don’t enjoy this, others do. There’s room enough in the parks for both so it’s all gravy.
 

castlecake2.0

Well-Known Member
I seem to be very much in the minority when it comes to giving themed environments and experiences a thorough and rigorous contemplation within the overall historical context of art, design and architecture, but that’s ok. I enjoy placing theme parks and such in a greater framework and viewing them as art you experience and critiquing the results as one would any other work of art.

Some don’t enjoy this, others do. There’s room enough in the parks for both so it’s all gravy.
Ow my head.
 

TrojanUSC

Well-Known Member
I find it to be at the intersection of modern and postmodern architecture. While a brutalist concrete structure, it’s also a comically oversized A-frame, lending itself to reading as a historical reference. Bit of a different discussion.

You’re probably right. That very well may be the intent. It may have been all along. Maybe I just misinterpreted the intended theme based on the name of the resort and it opening at the tail end of the modernist movement.

Well ironically the entire decor of the common areas when it opened was a American Southwest motif, which is odd since there's little less contemporary than that.

Now I think they are aware of the building's flaws and have just decided to embrace the era in which it was designed (mid-century). It also helps that The Incredibles has a similar aesthetic, though I wish they'd leave the cartoons out of the deluxe hotels.
 

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