Children Returning to Schools

seabreezept813

Well-Known Member
Can’t that minority be dealt with during a pandemic? Maybe forced to do virtual if don’t comply? We are in strange times with new rules and rules no one expected, right? Shouldn’t public schools have the authority to protect their school community from the type of students you listed?

The honest answer is who knows. We’ve had several instances where kids get off when they shouldn’t. We’ve asked about how it can be enforced and what admin are prepared to do and they won’t give us answers.
 

seabreezept813

Well-Known Member
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The thing is there’s no effort to build confidence in a return. Any concerns or questions we have, we don’t get answers to.. such as the no masks at lunch. We’ve asked if lunch can be outside or do half days.. absolutely no responses. It’s hard to get on board a model when there is no academic discussion about the details. This is how you end up with schools shut down two days later. The details were ignored.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
The thing is there’s no effort to build confidence in a return. Any concerns or questions we have, we don’t get answers to.. such as the no masks at lunch. We’ve asked if lunch can be outside or do half days.. absolutely no responses. It’s hard to get on board a model when there is no academic discussion about the details. This is how you end up with schools shut down two days later. The details were ignored.

Who is responsible for this? What level? These people need to be held accountable. It’s not just individual schools districts who should have been planning, the officers higher up should have had a good outline for what was acceptable requests and requirements.
 
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ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Can’t that minority be dealt with during a pandemic? Maybe forced to do virtual if don’t comply? We are in strange times with new rules and rules no one expected, right? Shouldn’t public schools have the authority to protect their school community from the type of students you listed?
Because yes, let's exacerbate the educational differences between the haves and have nots. That would be a lawsuit waiting to happen.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
Then you are a perfect candidate for distance learning. At the same time, hopefully realizing that many kids have returned to socialization and extracurriculars, and those kids don’t want to go back to being locked at home all day.
We’ve covered this already - there is nothing even remotely perfect about distance learning for my daughter. Nor is she immune from the negative impacts of the lack of socialization.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
Then you are a perfect candidate for distance learning. At the same time, hopefully realizing that many kids have returned to socialization and extracurriculars, and those kids don’t want to go back to being locked at home all day.






It’s the same lesson plan. You can send out the same assignments. If live stream isn’t possible, then your record, and send afterwards.

There are times when improvising and thinking outside of the box are necessary, not just thinking statically while making excuses for why something “can’t” be done. Everyone in this country has had to that recently.
Except the parents and families you’re talking about don’t *want* only recorded lessons either. They want live teacher interaction, as that is a crucial part of learning as well. Everyone wants live teacher interaction for their kid, every day. Whether it’s virtual or in person. And the fact of the matter is that’s not physically possible for most districts. The teacher shortages that have existed for years before this certainly don’t help that either.

I’m not making excuses - there absolutely needs to be more out of the box thinking. But realities like staffing and infrastructure also need to be kept in mind, because like it or not there are obstacles to get past.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
I truly think the best thing for all; would be for schools to post availability for teaching positions, and see how many qualified candidates apply. This way, the teachers are willing to take the risk, and not feel like they’re being forced.
There is a nationwide teacher shortage. There has been for years. there are not enough currently unemployed teachers to take the place of teachers who do not want to be in person. There are unfilled positions in my district every year, for the entire year - never filled. this is what happens when education is as neglected as it has been for years in this country.
 

Patcheslee

Well-Known Member
The thing is there’s no effort to build confidence in a return. Any concerns or questions we have, we don’t get answers to.. such as the no masks at lunch. We’ve asked if lunch can be outside or do half days.. absolutely no responses. It’s hard to get on board a model when there is no academic discussion about the details. This is how you end up with schools shut down two days later. The details were ignored.
We didn't get details for our school until 2 days before virtual vs in person decision had to be made. Then the minute by minute schedule and class schedule until past the deadline. The day before school started. This is how lunch has gone for DD11 6th grade (they have their own separate school building due to the amount of students BTW) the past 2 days now:
Go to 4th period class and drop off books, supplies, ect, attendance, classwork/lecture 34 minutes to do. Line up in the hallway 6ft apart and wait with the teacher to be led to the cafeteria (there is a classroom before them that have to get through the line and seated first). Go through the lunch line if they didn't bring their lunch, then sit at an assigned seat 6ft distanced in the cafeteria or up on the stage, then mask can be removed to eat, no talking. Anyone who brings their lunch goes to a separate hallway with tables to eat, also assigned and 6ft apart. Lunch is now broken up into 3 periods, so not all kids are at lunch or recess at the same time. Once done eating sit with mask on to be dismissed 1 at a time to dump tray and go back to 4th period classroom. 35 minutes for all this. From 4th period classroom after all students have returned from lunch another 14 minutes classwork/lecture time. Then a 15 minute recess for all kids (Pre-Covid this was the grade kids weren't walked to lunch by teachers anymore and simply had 40 minutes for lunch and recess/freetime)
This is a single grade and building, and still having to utilize extra spaces to distance for lunch, along with now putting more supervising responsibility on teachers. On top of having to interupt a lesson daily. I have a hard time believing teachers appreciate needing to refocus students again after lunch. And believing a school with multiple grades are going to be able to distance students without multiple lunch times and alot of overflow areas, which then also have to be monitored, and disruption to lessons.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
I truly think the best thing for all; would be for schools to post availability for teaching positions, and see how many qualified candidates apply. This way, the teachers are willing to take the risk, and not feel like they’re being forced.
If inner city LA and Newport Beach, CA posted teaching positions for all to see, who do you think will get the most applications? Let's just look at reality in your idea.
 
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seabreezept813

Well-Known Member
We didn't get details for our school until 2 days before virtual vs in person decision had to be made. Then the minute by minute schedule and class schedule until past the deadline. The day before school started. This is how lunch has gone for DD11 6th grade (they have their own separate school building due to the amount of students BTW) the past 2 days now:
Go to 4th period class and drop off books, supplies, ect, attendance, classwork/lecture 34 minutes to do. Line up in the hallway 6ft apart and wait with the teacher to be led to the cafeteria (there is a classroom before them that have to get through the line and seated first). Go through the lunch line if they didn't bring their lunch, then sit at an assigned seat 6ft distanced in the cafeteria or up on the stage, then mask can be removed to eat, no talking. Anyone who brings their lunch goes to a separate hallway with tables to eat, also assigned and 6ft apart. Lunch is now broken up into 3 periods, so not all kids are at lunch or recess at the same time. Once done eating sit with mask on to be dismissed 1 at a time to dump tray and go back to 4th period classroom. 35 minutes for all this. From 4th period classroom after all students have returned from lunch another 14 minutes classwork/lecture time. Then a 15 minute recess for all kids (Pre-Covid this was the grade kids weren't walked to lunch by teachers anymore and simply had 40 minutes for lunch and recess/freetime)
This is a single grade and building, and still having to utilize extra spaces to distance for lunch, along with now putting more supervising responsibility on teachers. On top of having to interupt a lesson daily. I have a hard time believing teachers appreciate needing to refocus students again after lunch. And believing a school with multiple grades are going to be able to distance students without multiple lunch times and alot of overflow areas, which then also have to be monitored, and disruption to lessons.

It sounds awful. For us, they are talking about using classrooms and we keep asking who supervises? What about food allergies? What cleaning takes place afterwards? It’s a terrible scenario for virus particles to travel or longer and no one wants to be in an enclosed room when the kids are unmasked. It’s super concerning. As to who to blame it’s a pass the buck situation. “Well we haven’t heard anything yet. Well we’re waiting for state guidance etc etc”
 

seabreezept813

Well-Known Member

21stamps

Well-Known Member
He does it again- no throws it all to the superintendents.


I would actually agree with the following part... IF that would have been taking place the past few months. Why wait til now?

New Jersey’s nearly 600 school districts will not be able to simply chose to go all-remote, the source said. Instead, the districts will need to show the state Department of Education the reasons why they can’t offer in-person classes at the start of the 2020-2021 school year and what they are doing to solve those problems.


“Districts are expected to continue to work with the DOE towards getting to the point where they can provide an in-person experience. Districts are expected to have to tell the department what hurdles to providing in-person education they are facing and a date they are working towards resolving those hurdles,” the source said. “The goal is still to have as much in-person learning as possible in the state.”
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
This is so ridiculous. There is no consistency in this area about what plans are being adopted. The commissioner of education hasn’t shown his face in weeks. It’s crazy.
it has been crazy- constantly changing plans almost at a whim. No communication until last minute, it has made this far more difficult than it needed to be

These governors are clearly failing. Why not just set what standards are recommended or required, and let each district carry it out?
 

Patcheslee

Well-Known Member
These governors are clearly failing. Why not just set what standards are recommended or required, and let each district carry it out?
We don’t have governor direction, not even who is considered a close contact, or tracing compared to other districts we were notified of this change the first day of school. At a minimum you would expect the close contact, symptomatic, ect. would all have the same requirements in the state. As of now students can return after 24 hours without a fever if no other symptoms are present. It doesn't automatically require a COVID-19 test or even a doctor visit unless they have considered the student a close contact with a confirmed case.
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
When do you start? More importantly, when can you vote him out?

I’m all for schools going back, but your governor’s ping pong play is not making it easy on school staff or parents right now.
Correct- he’s a disaster & has handled this (school
Issues) horribly. We delayed our start a bit to do some teacher training. We’re likely going to default to the county, and see what they say. If they decide to provide guidance, which is a big gift. Further- parents are signing up kids for virtual by the truck load right now. So Murphy might be null and void regardless.
 
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