Cabins at FW sales thread

Raxel7851

Well-Known Member
I’m thinking the designers could have squeezed in a stackable washer/dryer combo unit in somewhere. Although the laundry facilities in the bath house are super clean, they can be quite a distance away from your cabin. And if you decide to rent a golf cart, that’s an extra $65 a day.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
I’m thinking the designers could have squeezed in a stackable washer/dryer combo unit in somewhere. Although the laundry facilities in the bath house are super clean, they can be quite a distance away from your cabin. And if you decide to rent a golf cart, that’s an extra $65 a day.
Some things make sense to sell as a timeshare. A trailer that doesn't have washer and dryer that forces you to maybe rent a golf cart to get to them ain't one of them. That said, I am intrigued by these things and might try to book one at some point for a trip, but the fees and what it is make buying in prohibitive. I really think they should have had a lower buy in per point if they wanted to wrangle in more sales.
 
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nickys

Premium Member
Original Poster
Some things make sense to sell as a timeshare. A trailer that doesn't have wahs and dryer that forces you to maybe rent a golf cart to get to them ain't one of them. That said, I am intrigued by these things and might try to book one at some point for a trip, but the fees and what it is make buying in prohibitive. I really think they should have had a lower buy in per point if they wanted to wrangle in more sales.
Honestly I think the maintenance fees are responsible for killing sales.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
Honestly I think the maintenance fees are responsible for killing sales.
I guess what I am thinking, is do they required such high maintenance fees(and maybe it's because the way they are built etc), the buy in per point should have been lower, to at least get buyers. I know when I bought in I hadn't given a ton of thought to maintenance fees, and AKL had some pretty high ones comparatively but these cabin ones are ridiculous.
 

nickys

Premium Member
Original Poster
I guess what I am thinking, is do they required such high maintenance fees(and maybe it's because the way they are built etc), the buy in per point should have been lower, to at least get buyers. I know when I bought in I hadn't given a ton of thought to maintenance fees, and AKL had some pretty high ones comparatively but these cabin ones are ridiculous.
The high maintenance fees are because the cabins will need to be replaced half way through the contracts expire. And that’s going to cost a lot more than a typical hard goods room refurb.

The problem with a lower buy-in cost is that at 7 months all points are equal.

But yes, it’s the only thing that might have tipped the scales.

Another issue though is that the 150 points minimum buy-in compared to the points charts is too high. Even with a lower cost per point. And existing owners would probably have still said no to an add-on because of the maintenance fees.

All in all I think the concept was dead in the water the minute they announced the maintenance fees.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
The high maintenance fees are because the cabins will need to be replaced half way through the contracts expire. And that’s going to cost a lot more than a typical hard goods room refurb.

The problem with a lower buy-in cost is that at 7 months all points are equal.

But yes, it’s the only thing that might have tipped the scales.

Another issue though is that the 150 points minimum buy-in compared to the points charts is too high. Even with a lower cost per point. And existing owners would probably have still said no to an add-on because of the maintenance fees.

All in all I think the concept was dead in the water the minute they announced the maintenance fees.
I'm not well versed in the timeshare game, but do you know what happens if the sales never materialize and the buy in group is limited? Do they then have to pay maybe even more in fees(like a condo building with empty units) to cover for the unsold points or because Disney rents cash rooms that covers it?
 

nickys

Premium Member
Original Poster
I'm not well versed in the timeshare game, but do you know what happens if the sales never materialize and the buy in group is limited? Do they then have to pay maybe even more in fees(like a condo building with empty units) to cover for the unsold points or because Disney rents cash rooms that covers it?
Fees can only be used for running costs, including some for the capital reserves. And they can only increase by a certain amount each year.
If sales don’t materialise then I assume Disney keeps ownership of the undeclared units. But I’m not sure either.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
Fees can only be used for running costs, including some for the capital reserves. And they can only increase by a certain amount each year.
If sales don’t materialise then I assume Disney keeps ownership of the undeclared units. But I’m not sure either.
I know this, they are being booked like hot cakes though. I was booking for November and they were gone as soon as the booking window was open. The buy in value is not great, but for us other owners it's appealing, especially of doing a shorter stay where laundry is not a concern.
 

nickys

Premium Member
Original Poster
I know this, they are being booked like hot cakes though. I was booking for November and they were gone as soon as the booking window was open. The buy in value is not great, but for us other owners it's appealing, especially of doing a shorter stay where laundry is not a concern.
They’re going to be very popular for booking. Both on points and on cash through Disney.

Not sure what that has to do with what I posted though.

The cabins will all be replaced anyway. So at some point Disney will likely own more new cabins than the number declared.
That means it takes way longer for Disney to recoup the cost of replacing them.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
They’re going to be very popular for booking. Both on points and on cash through Disney.

Not sure what that has to do with what I posted though.

The cabins will all be replaced anyway. So at some point Disney will likely own more new cabins than the number declared.
That means it takes way longer for Disney to recoup the cost of replacing them.
It was just something, I was thinking about and was trying to be conversational, did not mean to make you think I was in some way going against what you wrote.
 
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Doberge

True Bayou Magic
Premium Member
Fees can only be used for running costs, including some for the capital reserves. And they can only increase by a certain amount each year.
If sales don’t materialise then I assume Disney keeps ownership of the undeclared units. But I’m not sure either.

Yes, the same as other resorts with undeclared units. The benefit to Disney is keeping 100% cash vs sharing with the association for breakage. Disney's been gaming breakage for at least a decade The rooms will still make Disney a lot of money as opened and rented through prime seasons at cash rates. As rooms are new Disney does best renting rooms for cash, and that works great if occupancy is high enough. As newness wears off and cash demand begins waning then ideal for Disney is a higher percentage declared and people using points.

So Disney won't seriously fret low sales if cash occupancy is high, and Fort occupancy should remain high for the foreseeable future for three reasons: (1) newness, (2) upcoming prime season, (3) low volume of rooms as they come online through Spring 2025.

As newness wears off and cash demand begins waning then ideal for Disney is a higher percentage declared and people using points. So while sales have still been abysmal it's a problem to worry about another day.
 

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