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Bob Weis steps down as WDI President

SpoiledBlueMilk

Well-Known Member
Being an outsider is a strength and a weakness for the exact same reason, you don’t necessarily know why things are done the way they are. That’s great for questioning a broken process but it can also result in needed processes being discarded. The big issue though is trust. Is someone without experience going to have the trust to cut through the bloat? We’ve all heard the stories of Walt Disney Imagineering ignoring Ops.
I guess we'll see what happens. Who knows, maybe we will get lucky. Perfect world scenario - they hot lane the Spaceship Earth upgrade and cancel the Splash retheme.
 

Lands of Wonder

Well-Known Member
Ummm, those people have mouths to feed and rent to pay at home in Oviedo or Clermont so they won't do it for the "magic". That ship sailed many years ago and only lives on in the CP (Slave) program.
Sad, if I had their jobs I would be all about the parks, I wouldn’t have time for my lap of luxury because I’d be to busy doing what I love. These people have no place in Disney in my book. Free time means do what you love, a true Disney executive, Chairman or CEO would spend their spare time involved with Disney as if it were their hobby. If I had the keys to the kingdom I’d live full time at Disney World, spend all my free time walking the parks, eating at the parks somewhere different every night paying full attention to detail. People pay to do that. I’d never stop, I’d always be working and improving, sleep then go back to it all over again. I’d chat with employees every chance I got, customers and make sure the Disney experience is really what the people want. If stand outside of exits and observe facial expression and listen into conversation to check for any negative feedback. What do you think built that empire in the first place?
 
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lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Sad, if I had their jobs I would be all about the parks, I wouldn’t have time for my lap of luxury because I’d be to busy doing what I love. These people have no place in Disney in my book. Disney needs a CEO who lives, breaths and sleeps Disney, maybe even lives on site. If I were head honcho of Imagineering I’d walk the parks every work day I’m in the area, I have yet to see an Imagineer present in the parks.
What does an Imagineer look like?
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Sad, if I had their jobs I would be all about the parks, I wouldn’t have time for my lap of luxury because I’d be to busy doing what I love. These people have no place in Disney in my book. Free time means do what you love, a true Disney executive, Chairman or CEO would spend their spare time involved with Disney as if it were their hobby. If I had the keys to the kingdom I’d live full time at Disney World, spend all my free time walking the parks, eating at the parks somewhere different every night paying full attention to detail. People pay to do that. I’d never stop, I’d always be working and improving, sleep then go back to it all over again. I’d chat with employees every chance I got, customers and make sure the Disney experience is really what the people want. If stand outside of exits and observe facial expression and listen into conversation to check for any negative feedback. What do you think built that empire in the first place?
I'm sure they vacation at WDW or DLR experiencing parks with their families and friends and not even spending their own dime!
 
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HauntedPirate

Park nostalgist
Premium Member
What does an Imagineer look like?
In the parks:

1638382267698.gif
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
Sad, if I had their jobs I would be all about the parks, I wouldn’t have time for my lap of luxury because I’d be to busy doing what I love. These people have no place in Disney in my book. Free time means do what you love, a true Disney executive, Chairman or CEO would spend their spare time involved with Disney as if it were their hobby. If I had the keys to the kingdom I’d live full time at Disney World, spend all my free time walking the parks, eating at the parks somewhere different every night paying full attention to detail. People pay to do that. I’d never stop, I’d always be working and improving, sleep then go back to it all over again. I’d chat with employees every chance I got, customers and make sure the Disney experience is really what the people want. If stand outside of exits and observe facial expression and listen into conversation to check for any negative feedback. What do you think built that empire in the first place?
I thought the same thing too... until I actually worked FOR the mouse. It’s not at all what it’s cracked up to be. Terrible company to work for.
 

JoeCamel

Well-Known Member
If stand outside of exits and observe facial expression and listen into conversation to check for any negative feedback. What do you think built that empire in the first place?
About that, I noticed very few smiles on those faces. Mostly a grim look of determination to "get it done" and check all the boxes that tell them they had a successful vacation. It is now work to go to WDW and most don't want to work on their vacation.
 

comics101

Well-Known Member
Sad, if I had their jobs I would be all about the parks, I wouldn’t have time for my lap of luxury because I’d be to busy doing what I love. These people have no place in Disney in my book. Free time means do what you love, a true Disney executive, Chairman or CEO would spend their spare time involved with Disney as if it were their hobby. If I had the keys to the kingdom I’d live full time at Disney World, spend all my free time walking the parks, eating at the parks somewhere different every night paying full attention to detail. People pay to do that. I’d never stop, I’d always be working and improving, sleep then go back to it all over again. I’d chat with employees every chance I got, customers and make sure the Disney experience is really what the people want. If stand outside of exits and observe facial expression and listen into conversation to check for any negative feedback. What do you think built that empire in the first place?

So I think there's a lot of truth in what you're saying, however I'd also suggest that the ideal candidate for the position also needs to balance their love of product with corporate expectations and have a real-world understanding of the job they've been given to do. But you're right, it does feel as though current Disney management has disdain for their products and customers. There's no confidence in their ability to bring new visitors to the parks anymore; no understanding of what makes a person become a die-hard fan of Walt Disney World and of theme parks generally. Management seems to believe that if you can replicate a movie environment while throwing a roller coaster track on top, you're golden. I suspect that's short-sighted. I suppose we'll see who's right long-term.

Additionally, it's important for an Imagineer to gain real-world insight and experience outside of the theme park world. I can't remember who wrote it or where I read it (probably this forum, maybe Twitter), but it was once said that what distinguished Walt's original Imagineers from the current crop of Imagineers was an understanding of architecture in the real world. The original Imagineers, it was suggested, created theme park environments from whole cloth, and therefore relied on real-world structures throughout Europe, Polynesia, the American West, etc. when creating Disneyland and WDW. Today's Imagineers grew up going to theme parks. The 1983 Fantasyland refurb was completed before they were born. Disneyland Paris opened with they were 5 years old. These "fantasy/ideal" environments they construct are therefore artificial-feeling, because they are based on the fake.
 

Lands of Wonder

Well-Known Member
So I think there's a lot of truth in what you're saying, however I'd also suggest that the ideal candidate for the position also needs to balance their love of product with corporate expectations and have a real-world understanding of the job they've been given to do. But you're right, it does feel as though current Disney management has disdain for their products and customers. There's no confidence in their ability to bring new visitors to the parks anymore; no understanding of what makes a person become a die-hard fan of Walt Disney World and of theme parks generally. Management seems to believe that if you can replicate a movie environment while throwing a roller coaster track on top, you're golden. I suspect that's short-sighted. I suppose we'll see who's right long-term.

Additionally, it's important for an Imagineer to gain real-world insight and experience outside of the theme park world. I can't remember who wrote it or where I read it (probably this forum, maybe Twitter), but it was once said that what distinguished Walt's original Imagineers from the current crop of Imagineers was an understanding of architecture in the real world. The original Imagineers, it was suggested, created theme park environments from whole cloth, and therefore relied on real-world structures throughout Europe, Polynesia, the American West, etc. when creating Disneyland and WDW. Today's Imagineers grew up going to theme parks. The 1983 Fantasyland refurb was completed before they were born. Disneyland Paris opened with they were 5 years old. These "fantasy/ideal" environments they construct are therefore artificial-feeling, because they are based on the fake.
Totally agree, I just feel where looking at people who chase a dream and don’t give a damn what happens in the parks or with the product as long as they get their power and money. There dream is only for their empire, the dreamland they can build for themselves outside of work. What they need is a brilliant, smart but eccentric dreamer who wants to capture that family nostalgia and share it with others. When I say nostalgia I don’t mean recreate the old Disney I mean make that nostalgia with attractions we can’t even dream of that we’ll cherish for the rest of our lives even after their gone. I think so far every attraction that has come along we saw coming in some shape or form and were underwhelmed just the same.
 

JoeCamel

Well-Known Member
Totally agree, I just feel where looking at people who chase a dream and don’t give a damn what happens in the parks or with the product as long as they get their power and money. There dream is only for their empire, the dreamland they can build for themselves outside of work. What they need is a brilliant, smart but eccentric dreamer who wants to capture that family nostalgia and share it with others. When I say nostalgia I don’t mean recreate the old Disney I mean make that nostalgia with attractions we can’t even dream of that we’ll cherish for the rest of our lives even after their gone. I think so far every attraction that has come along we saw coming in some shape or form and were underwhelmed just the same.
We know too much today, really hard (expensive) to wow the crowd.
10 years ago Bob said the parks were a "mature" market as an excuse not to put money into them. Some little kid burst that bubble but the reluctance to pour money into their cash cows was evident for years.
Today the tech and cinematic worlds have expanded so we are not easily amused so it takes boatloads of money to bring new experiences to our jaded eyes and it gets harder for the "imagineers" to deliver a fresh product at a reasonable price. The costs spiraled to the point they are upending the whole division with a complete revamp.
Lots of merch people pulling the strings now and the creatives are in decline so I would think twice about getting that DVC contract.
 

eddie104

Well-Known Member
What does an Imagineer look like?
That’s a good question because I think people have become so fascinated and obsessed with the original imagineers that they developed this thought they thought all should be the same.
We know too much today, really hard (expensive) to wow the crowd.
10 years ago Bob said the parks were a "mature" market as an excuse not to put money into them. Some little kid burst that bubble but the reluctance to pour money into their cash cows was evident for years.
Today the tech and cinematic worlds have expanded so we are not easily amused so it takes boatloads of money to bring new experiences to our jaded eyes and it gets harder for the "imagineers" to deliver a fresh product at a reasonable price. The costs spiraled to the point they are upending the whole division with a complete revamp.
Lots of merch people pulling the strings now and the creatives are in decline so I would think twice about getting that DVC contract.
I agree with a lot of this especially being jaded even though personally I don’t feel that way. I visit these forums every now and then and don’t go the parks like I used to. So my perspective tends to be like that of the GP.
 

Matthew

Well-Known Member
We don't know enough to say if it is a bad decision or not. The head of WDI isn't spending his or her time locked in a room thinking up ideas for new attractions, shows, and ships. They're leading project management and teams to do that. For all we know Barbara is an amazing leader. Let's give her some time.
Best comment on the thread.
 

Lands of Wonder

Well-Known Member
We know too much today, really hard (expensive) to wow the crowd.
10 years ago Bob said the parks were a "mature" market as an excuse not to put money into them. Some little kid burst that bubble but the reluctance to pour money into their cash cows was evident for years.
Today the tech and cinematic worlds have expanded so we are not easily amused so it takes boatloads of money to bring new experiences to our jaded eyes and it gets harder for the "imagineers" to deliver a fresh product at a reasonable price. The costs spiraled to the point they are upending the whole division with a complete revamp.
Lots of merch people pulling the strings now and the creatives are in decline so I would think twice about getting that DVC contract.
Everyone’s different, they can throw up just fireworks and fountains as long as the music score is good and synchronized well I’m happy. They can’t even seem to do that with all this new tech. I will admit that they do have to kind of compete with the average homeowner. Anyone can recreate Laserphonic Fantasy in their own back yard if they put in the time money and effort. Large firework shells and a soundtrack exclusive to your show on the other hand is still something only Disney has.
 

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