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Bob Iger Stepping Down, Bob Chapek New CEO

Ayla

Well-Known Member
Stock’s at $93. What is the red line for Chapek, assuming we haven’t crossed it? News keeps getting worse and worse for him.

Also, FWIW, I don’t know who the superstar CEO is waiting in the wings. I know Josh has a lot of admirers here, but beyond performative empathy his fingerprints are all over those initiatives that people want to blame Chapek for.
All the potential CEO's were either fired or left on their own accord.
 

The Moles Family

Well-Known Member
Stock’s at $93. What is the red line for Chapek, assuming we haven’t crossed it? News keeps getting worse and worse for him.

Also, FWIW, I don’t know who the superstar CEO is waiting in the wings. I know Josh has a lot of admirers here, but beyond performative empathy his fingerprints are all over those initiatives that people want to blame Chapek for.
106411838-1582752245437gettyimages-545168714.jpeg
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Something occurred to me today. Iger’s early success (and one of his proudest achievements) was the Pixar acquisition. If you look at Chapek’s moves, it seems he’s diminished (either intentionally or by poor management) the Pixar brand. I think Lasseter’s loss and some brain drain is to blame to a degree, but for a company/entity that at one point could do no wrong, it seems they’ve lost their way terribly. It’s basically another imprint now within the company. I wonder how the BOD (and Iger on the sidelines) will view the diminishment of this brand.
When Chapek got promoted he walked into a minefield as CEO to navigate Covid, not an easy task to do. Some other items he has done is surely debatable and questionable.
 

Communicora

Premium Member
When Chapek got promoted he walked into a minefield as CEO to navigate Covid, not an easy task to do. Some other items he has done is surely debatable and questionable.

Logitech's CEO Bracken Darrell had this to say about that.

Interestingly, Darrell’s take is that Chapek was given a tremendous advantage with the timing of the pandemic and park closures. “It’s always better to have a problem to solve,” he says, noting that coming in when things are perfect only leaves a margin for error.
This is from the Fortune article
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Logitech's CEO Bracken Darrell had this to say about that.

Interestingly, Darrell’s take is that Chapek was given a tremendous advantage with the timing of the pandemic and park closures. “It’s always better to have a problem to solve,” he says, noting that coming in when things are perfect only leaves a margin for error.
This is from the Fortune article
Apparently whatever people think of him , it is looking like the Disney Board will extend his contract.
 

Communicora

Premium Member
Apparently whatever people think of him , it is looking like the Disney Board will extend his contract.

Yeah, they may very well do that. This article starts off focusing on Imagineering and then transitions into Chapek contract conversation.


And here's one from The Wrap (syndicated to Yahoo) that describes more competition for Chapek

 

Poseidon Quest

Well-Known Member
Something occurred to me today. Iger’s early success (and one of his proudest achievements) was the Pixar acquisition. If you look at Chapek’s moves, it seems he’s diminished (either intentionally or by poor management) the Pixar brand. I think Lasseter’s loss and some brain drain is to blame to a degree, but for a company/entity that at one point could do no wrong, it seems they’ve lost their way terribly. It’s basically another imprint now within the company. I wonder how the BOD (and Iger on the sidelines) will view the diminishment of this brand.

The recent Pixar films were still developed under Iger though. Lightyear started development in 2019 and now it's a box office bomb (at least by Disney standards)? Perhaps it was Chapek's decision to bring Soul, Luca and Turning Red to Disney+, but I do think that overall, the Pixar brand has diminished under Iger. For me, the studio peaked with Ratatouille, Wall-E and Up. When they set out to do Toy Story 3 with its weak, flanderized characters, it was a sign that obligatory franchise films would become a part of their line-up. While no Pixar film is actually bad (even Cars 2 is at least watchable), my interest has become hit or miss. It may also be difficult to gauge how well these films would have done if released, as it appears that consumer relationships to movie theaters has changed (or at least has not yet quite returned to what it was pre-COVID), but I would argue that the Pixar brand and image is still most heavily focused on films pre-Toy Story 3.
 

Rich Brownn

Well-Known Member
The recent Pixar films were still developed under Iger though. Lightyear started development in 2019 and now it's a box office bomb (at least by Disney standards)? Perhaps it was Chapek's decision to bring Soul, Luca and Turning Red to Disney+, but I do think that overall, the Pixar brand has diminished under Iger. For me, the studio peaked with Ratatouille, Wall-E and Up. When they set out to do Toy Story 3 with its weak, flanderized characters, it was a sign that obligatory franchise films would become a part of their line-up. While no Pixar film is actually bad (even Cars 2 is at least watchable), my interest has become hit or miss. It may also be difficult to gauge how well these films would have done if released, as it appears that consumer relationships to movie theaters has changed (or at least has not yet quite returned to what it was pre-COVID), but I would argue that the Pixar brand and image is still most heavily focused on films pre-Toy Story 3.
What? TS3 is one of the best. heck, it even got nominated for Best Picture, only 2 others ever have.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
The recent Pixar films were still developed under Iger though. Lightyear started development in 2019 and now it's a box office bomb (at least by Disney standards)? Perhaps it was Chapek's decision to bring Soul, Luca and Turning Red to Disney+, but I do think that overall, the Pixar brand has diminished under Iger. For me, the studio peaked with Ratatouille, Wall-E and Up. When they set out to do Toy Story 3 with its weak, flanderized characters, it was a sign that obligatory franchise films would become a part of their line-up. While no Pixar film is actually bad (even Cars 2 is at least watchable), my interest has become hit or miss. It may also be difficult to gauge how well these films would have done if released, as it appears that consumer relationships to movie theaters has changed (or at least has not yet quite returned to what it was pre-COVID), but I would argue that the Pixar brand and image is still most heavily focused on films pre-Toy Story 3.
In terms of the brand, I think the reason Pixar doesn't stand out as much anymore is because Disney's own animation output has become a lot better and they (along with everyone else) also now use computer animation. My own interest in Pixar has also waxed and waned over the years as they started getting more into sequels, but I think their last few original films have been well-received and successful in the new world of streaming. That Pixar doesn't stand alone at the pinnacle of US animation, though, is not necessarily because Pixar has become worse, at least in my opinion. If anything, I think their recent output has shown an uptick in quality.
 

Vegas Disney Fan

Well-Known Member
A lump of rock with an ounce of charisma and the ability to go to a public speaking engagement without bumbling and sweating through his suit is better than a lump of rock. 🤷‍♂️

He’s basically Dr Evil at this point, the fact he looks like him and has no charisma doesn’t help his case.

It’s just one negative change after another since he took over, fundamentally changed the AP program, cancelled Magical Express, implemented reservations, invoked a political firestorm, replaced FP with a paid system… his short reign (of terror) as CEO has been a never ending implementation of negative changes.

I think he’s intentionally trying to become a super villain.
 
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Poseidon Quest

Well-Known Member
What? TS3 is one of the best. heck, it even got nominated for Best Picture, only 2 others ever have.

It's a competently helmed film, but also highly flawed. Like I said, the characters are flanderized and feel inauthentic. Many of the character moments are contrived to the point of feeling cringy, such as the scene where Andy hands his toys down to Bonnie. Also, have you watched it recently? I'm not sure why the decision was made to do this at the time, but the lighting is very blown out. It's an ugly decision considering how far their animation had advanced at that time.

In terms of the brand, I think the reason Pixar doesn't stand out as much anymore is because Disney's own animation output has become a lot better and they (along with everyone else) also now use computer animation. My own interest in Pixar has also waxed and waned over the years as they started getting more into sequels, but I think their last few original films have been well-received and successful in the new world of streaming. That Pixar doesn't stand alone at the pinnacle of US animation, though, is not necessarily because Pixar has become worse, at least in my opinion. If anything, I think their recent output has shown an uptick in quality.

I will agree that their recent films have certainly been better, but their representation post-Toy Story 3 is minimal other than what is already a sequel film. The only exception may be a little bit of Inside Out and Coco, but you never see them represented in the same way as other films.
 

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
I know everyone hates on Chapek for all the changes. I always heard a lot of these changes were already planned well before Chapek took over.
 

DCBaker

Premium Member
"The corporate drama comes as Disney’s board of directors gathers in Orlando for its annual retreat, where the 11-member body, of which Chapek is a member, thoroughly reviews the company’s businesses and engages in deep dives on strategic questions.

The meeting, which begins Monday, is expected to culminate in the christening of the firm’s newest cruise ship, the Disney Wish, with a Wednesday event at Cape Canaveral featuring costumed Disney characters and the Make-a-Wish Foundation. Chapek sits on the nonprofit organization’s national board of directors.

While questions about leadership are sure to come up, the board meetings tend to be dominated by long, dry business presentations. CEO contracts are typically discussed in committee behind closed doors or remotely. Most people who spoke to the Times expect the board to re-up Chapek, if not at the meeting, then later this year.

A Disney spokeswoman declined to comment on board activities, and members of the board didn’t respond to requests for comment.

Christine McCarthy, Disney’s senior executive vice president and chief financial officer, praised Chapek’s leadership in a statement provided to the Times.

“Bob Chapek stepped into his CEO role only two weeks before most of the company’s businesses shutdown, and he deserves credit for leading the company through the unprecedented crisis of a global pandemic and emerging even stronger,” McCarthy said. “His fact-based decision making has been focused on creating long-term value for the company and delivering results, and I could not be more happy with the great team Bob has created over the past few years. That, to me, is the sign of true leadership.”

Disney Chairman Susan Arnold, in a statement earlier this month, signaled that Chapek had the board’s backing and praised his “leadership and vision for the company’s future.”

Reversing that position would be embarrassing for the board, people familiar with the company said. Plus, there’s no obvious internal candidate for the job, a significant factor for Disney, which tends to promote from within.

Still, Arnold’s statement did little to still wagging tongues in Hollywood, where some viewed a statement of support without a firm contract commitment as coming from a place of weakness."

Full piece -


Archive link -

 

SaucyBoy

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
“His fact-based decision making has been focused on creating long-term value for the company and delivering results, and I could not be more happy with the great team Bob has created over the past few years. That, to me, is the sign of true leadership.”
This reads like someone who has a gun pointed to their head. Good grief :facepalm:
 

ElvisMickey

Well-Known Member
I know everyone hates on Chapek for all the changes. I always heard a lot of these changes were already planned well before Chapek took over.
Iger was no dummy…he got out while the gettin’ was good so Bobby could take the fall for the B.S. that he had already put in motion and the COVID cleanup.
 

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