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Black History Month

raven24

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
It’s that time of the year again. I celebrate Black history every day, but there is a dedicated month, albeit the shortest month of the year, that “celebrates” Black history. The same names are thrown out each year, but I love Black history, so whatever, I guess.

I’ve come back from my mental break, only to run into more ridiculous and overall strange posts, so I will be using this thread as therapy, so to speak, before I fully jump back into discussion. I will simply post pictures that I like that depict the history of Africans in America.

I’m proud of my Blackness and proud of my African roots. I celebrate my magical hair, my brown skin, my big lips, and wide nose and hips. I celebrate my disturbing and yet rich history, and I hope to honor my ancestors and the social justice warriors who came before me. Happy Black History.✊🏾
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
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Previously the near-exclusive province of prominent whites, influential conservative public policy think tanks such as the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research began hosting like-minded black colleagues in the late 1970s. Though their numbers have always been small, traditional black adherents to conservatism have maintained a remarkably disciplined platform, which includes support for open and free markets, a belief that government-sponsored poverty eradication programs have failed, an animus toward a perceived overemphasis on white racism among contemporary black leadership, and a feeling that African Americans are best served by relying on themselves.

Though perhaps not self-identifying as conservative—some may hold conventionally liberal foreign policy views, while others, such as John McWhorter, would likely describe themselves as libertarian or moderate—all of the following African Americans are notable in that they hold (or have held) a philosophy generally associated with conservative political thought. One other note: with the exception of Zora Neale Hurston, there are no women in the following list. Though women such as Amy Holmes, La Shawn Barber, and Angela McGlowan are becoming recognized advocates of conservative policies, none can yet claim the level of authority or influence as the following. Until recently, black conservative leadership has simply been dominated by men.<<
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5) "It’s often said that the Democrats fight 'for the little guy.' That’s true: liberals fight to make sure the little guy stays little! Think about it. What if all the little guys were to prosper and become big guys? Then what? Who would liberals pretend to fight for? If the bamboozlers fight for anything, it’s to ensure that the little guy stays angry at those nasty conservatives who are holding him down." -- Angela McGlowan
4) "We might think of dollars as being 'certificates of performance.' The better I serve my fellow man, and the higher the value he places on that service, the more certificates of performance he gives me. The more certificates I earn, the greater my claim on the goods my fellow man produces. That’s the morality of the market. In order for one to have a claim on what his fellow man produces, he must first serve him." -- Walter Williams
3) "We've become a culture where earning money doesn't entitle you to it, but wanting it does. That is the essence of redistribution." -- Ken Blackwell
2) "Here’s Williams’ roadmap out of poverty: Complete high school; get a job, any kind of a job; get married before having children; and be a law-abiding citizen. Among both black and white Americans so described, the poverty rate is in the single digits." -- Walter Williams
1) "Weighing benefits against costs is the way most people make decisions — and the way most businesses make decisions, if they want to stay in business. Only in government is any benefit, however small, considered to be worth any cost, however large." -- Thomas Sowell
<<
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
To piggyback off of @Darkbeer1 , Abraham Lincoln was a Republican. And the Republicans to this day protect millions from the evils of slavery.
I agree with the first part of your comment, I can't comment on the second.

However,it was the southern democrats that were the biggest proponents of slavery as an institution and its survival during and after the war.
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
It’s that time of the year again. I celebrate Black history every day, but there is a dedicated month, albeit the shortest month of the year, that “celebrates” Black history. The same names are thrown out each year, but I love Black history, so whatever, I guess.

🏾
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_History_Month


There is a reason it is in February - and it has nothing to do with the length of the month.
 

MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
To piggyback off of @Darkbeer1 , Abraham Lincoln was a Republican. And the Republicans to this day protect millions from the evils of slavery.
Accurate to a century ago, decidedly not accurate today.

The first Ku Klux Klan established in 1865 was predominantly Democrat. The second Klan established in 1915 welcomed a bipartisan membership and gradually began attracting a Republican base. The third Klan was established in 1946. They are the group still active today and led the opposition against the civil rights movement of the 50s and 60s. They are predominantly Republican now.

The Democrats started to split around 1924 between factions who supported the Klan and those who opposed it. A group of Catholic liberals brought a proposal to the 1924 DNC to fight the Klan. The proposal lost by one vote and the Klan continued to increase in power for a couple of years. But the seeds were sown. This new liberal faction continued to grow and eventually overwhelmed the pro-slavery Democrats within a couple of decades.

Both the Democrat and Republican parties bear little resemblance to the parties they were a century ago. And this includes far more than their policies on slavery and civil rights.
 
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MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
Well the Democrats still believe in slavery. Except through welfare programs.
Out of over 10 posts in this thread now, Raven24 is the only person who has focused solely on black history without pushing partisan crap. It says a lot that the first instinct you and Darkbeer had upon seeing a topic about black history absent of any partisan attacks was to derail it with partisan attacks.

And yes I include myself with contributing to its derail, sorry about that Raven24.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
Out of over 10 posts in this thread now (and yes I include myself with contributing to its derail), Raven24 is the only person who has focused solely on black history without pushing partisan crap. It says a lot that the first instinct you and Darkbeer had upon seeing a topic about black history absent of any partisan attacks was to derail it with partisan attacks.
Posting about Black Americans is derailing with partisanship? Should we only focus on “certain” black Americans? People like Thomas Sowell should be excluded?
That doesn’t sound like good use of Black History Month, definitely doesn’t sound like a good way to teach children, or adults.
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
Out of over 10 posts in this thread now, Raven24 is the only person who has focused solely on black history without pushing partisan crap. It says a lot that the first instinct you and Darkbeer had upon seeing a topic about black history absent of any partisan attacks was to derail it with partisan attacks.

And yes I include myself with contributing to its derail, sorry about that Raven24.
I didn't realize that posting an explanation as to why February was chosen as Black History month was partisan.
But I agree - there is no need to make it partisan.
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
Out of over 10 posts in this thread now, Raven24 is the only person who has focused solely on black history without pushing partisan crap. It says a lot that the first instinct you and Darkbeer had upon seeing a topic about black history absent of any partisan attacks was to derail it with partisan attacks.

And yes I include myself with contributing to its derail, sorry about that Raven24.
I wonder why Raven felt the need to point out that it's the shortest month of the year.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
I’m right here, you can ask me yourself.

I refuse to let you guys and gals try to turn this thread into something it’s not. Enjoy the photos.
I agree with the premise of this thread. It’s a month that honors black history, and we all need to acknowledge it.

However, your first post points out the length of the month, physical attributes, same people being acknowledged.
It’s the same hostile and segregating tone. I don’t know if you realize that these posts come across that way so often.

It takes a good subject, and starts it off with an automatic defensive vibe.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Out of over 10 posts in this thread now, Raven24 is the only person who has focused solely on black history without pushing partisan crap. It says a lot that the first instinct you and Darkbeer had upon seeing a topic about black history absent of any partisan attacks was to derail it with partisan attacks.

And yes I include myself with contributing to its derail, sorry about that Raven24.
Thank you. This is why I had to take a mental break. Thank you for pointing out the main point of this thread and folks taking it upon themselves to change it, for whatever reason.

Thank you again. I hope you enjoy the photos I post and share.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I agree with the premise of this thread. It’s a month that honors black history, and we all need to acknowledge it.

However, your first post points out the length of the month, physical attributes, same people being acknowledged.
It’s the same hostile and segregating tone. I don’t know if you realize that these posts come across that way so often.

It takes a good subject, and starts it off with an automatic defensive vibe.
I've already spoken to you on what's actually divisive and what's not, in my opinion.

Enjoy the photos.
 
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