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An Inside Look at New Disney Parks Technology, Personalized Experiences and More

dclick4968

Active Member
#3
Technology is useless if the story being told or the environment being created doesn't have meaning. Meaning beyond boosting sales of the latest and greatest toys/plush/video games based on the latest and greatest movie. Sounds like they're getting tired of people (us) yelling that their decisions are not what made Disney Parks great in the first place. Seems they're hearing that we (fans) want them just to recreated the exact thing that would be been built 30-40 years ago (museum comment we've been hearing lately from them)...which of course is just not the case. We want them to build and create in the SPIRT of what was created years ago, not just duplicate. They're not listening to our words. In that aspect (creating in the spirit of), they're failing.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
#4
Wanna know how I can tell he doesn't care about the words coming out of his mouth?

He's using teleprompters for a 2 minute speech at the world's premier event for themed entertainment as the head of P&R for Disney.

Every single person on these boards could have memorized that "monologue" in a day or two. And it's not even our job.

It's painfully obvious he has zero passion for P&R.
 

HauntedPirate

Premium Member
#6
Well, I haven't eaten lunch yet, so I should probably hurry up and watch that video...

EDIT: OMG, what a disjointed pile of crap. Whoever wrote it probably got promoted (but should be fired). I had a hard time with the sudden shifts from stockholder presentation to pandering to regurgitating talking points about that old dead guy they don't care one whit about. Chapek doesn't have the slightest clue what he's doing, that much is crystal clear.
 
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mikejs78

Premium Member
#7
Wanna know how I can tell he doesn't care about the words coming out of his mouth?

He's using teleprompters for a 2 minute speech at the world's premier event for themed entertainment as the head of P&R for Disney.

Every single person on these boards could have memorized that "monologue" in a day or two. And it's not even our job.

It's painfully obvious he has zero passion for P&R.
I'll actually give him a pass for that. Public speaking is a different beast altogether. I'm passionate about my work, but whenever I speak about it, I need notes that I can refer to. It's not necessarily about a lack of passion.
 

FullSailDan

Well-Known Member
#8
Wanna know how I can tell he doesn't care about the words coming out of his mouth?

He's using teleprompters for a 2 minute speech at the world's premier event for themed entertainment as the head of P&R for Disney.

Every single person on these boards could have memorized that "monologue" in a day or two. And it's not even our job.

It's painfully obvious he has zero passion for P&R.
Meh, give me an example of an exec who can ramble off 2 minutes worth of PR & legal approved text from memory, in a natural way, and I'd be impressed. I think it's less an indicator of his passion for the parks and more an indicator of how much the man has going on and the short leash Disney PR keeps. That being said, Chapek is not my favorite guy. But very few leaders within that company are at the moment.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
#9
I'll actually give him a pass for that. Public speaking is a different beast altogether. I'm passionate about my work, but whenever I speak about it, I need notes that I can refer to. It's not necessarily about a lack of passion.
Meh, give me an example of an exec who can ramble off 2 minutes worth of PR & legal approved text from memory, in a natural way, and I'd be impressed. I think it's less an indicator of his passion for the parks and more an indicator of how much the man has going on and the short leash Disney PR keeps. That being said, Chapek is not my favorite guy. But very few leaders within that company are at the moment.
With respect, I completely disagree. Some people are better public speakers than others, no question about it. However, I'm of the opinion that you should hire people who are good public speakers, when they have a role in a company that requires them to speak publicly.

Again, just my opinion on the matter and how I see this guy presenting himself, the company and the company's future strategy.

Sorry, I just can't give the guy a pass for not memorizing a two minute speech. We all memorize that much information beginning in elementary school. No pass from me, don't care how much is on his plate, or what other matters are needing attention, or any other excuse. Cause they are all just that, excuses for not doing a better job presenting the information to the public.

Oh and as for execs of public companies publicly speaking well?? Off the top of my head.....Jobs, Buffet, Musk, Disney, Dimon, Cook....there are plenty of examples.
 

celluloid

Well-Known Member
#10
"Champions don't talk, they perform."


it is great to be proud, but this was like a mention to the industry that "we are still here and have caved to treating out service industry cast better." To me personally, some of the speech was discrediting itself and condescending other members of same industry by negatively speaking of museums.
 
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mikejs78

Premium Member
#12
With respect, I completely disagree. Some people are better public speakers than others, no question about it. However, I'm of the opinion that you should hire people who are good public speakers, when they have a role in a company that requires them to speak publicly.

Again, just my opinion on the matter and how I see this guy presenting himself, the company and the company's future strategy.

Sorry, I just can't give the guy a pass for not memorizing a two minute speech. We all memorize that much information beginning in elementary school. No pass from me, don't care how much is on his plate, or what other matters are needing attention, or any other excuse. Cause they are all just that, excuses for not doing a better job presenting the information to the public.

Oh and as for execs of public companies publicly speaking well?? Off the top of my head.....Jobs, Buffet, Musk, Disney, Dimon, Cook....there are plenty of examples.
Roy Disney was not a great speaker at all. Should he have not been the chairman of Disney Animation? Or Larry Paige (who is not a great speaker) the CEO of Google? And Steve Balmer was a better public speaker than Bill Gates, but it's pretty clear who was the better CEO. Public speaking can definitely be an asset for an executive, but not being a great public speaker doesn't make one a bad executive.
 

pax_65

Well-Known Member
#13
"Champions don't talk, they perform."
To build on this, Disney says a lot more by their actions than by their words. I don't really have a problem with anything he said (as much as I talk about how great Disney was in the past, I don't want the parks to be a museum either)... but I want to see ACTION. I'm glad Disney is now investing in WDW parks, even if I don't 100% agree with the direction they're headed.

The Universe of Energy was an embarrassment that we used to ride to laugh AT - and the attraction usually got the last laugh by breaking down on us. So while I don't want to see EPCOT become IPCOT I'm looking forward to (hopefully) a cutting-edge attraction that will at least be fun to experience.

I talk a lot about value... if Disney is going to continue to raise their ticket prices they better make the experience worth that added price. That means better attractions, longer hours, better live entertainment (shows, parades, fireworks, street performers), and handling crowds more effectively - so I'm not spending more time in queues.

So while we're finally getting some new attractions (that we've waited too long for), everything else on my list still needs a lot of work.
 

geekza

Well-Known Member
#14
However, I'm of the opinion that you should hire people who are good public speakers, when they have a role in a company that requires them to speak publicly.
I'm of the opinion that you should hire people who have talents that lie in artistry and creativity to be in charge of an entertainment company, but that ship sailed a long time ago. :( The fact that the parks are now lumped in with "Consumer Products" tells me everything I need to know.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
#15
Roy Disney was not a great speaker at all. Should he have not been the chairman of Disney Animation? Or Larry Paige (who is not a great speaker) the CEO of Google? And Steve Balmer was a better public speaker than Bill Gates, but it's pretty clear who was the better CEO. Public speaking can definitely be an asset for an executive, but not being a great public speaker doesn't make one a bad executive.
I never said anything of the sort. All I said was he (Chapek) is a poor public speaker whose lack of passion for the gig shows. You asked for public execs that are good public speakers, I named a few. Never said one was exclusive of the other. My suggestion is rooted in the fact that maybe, even as head of P&R (or E&P&CP....) he shouldn't be presenting to the public. Find someone who conveys and emotes properly for a company that makes its money on getting people to emote. I never said the CEO has to be a good public speaker but you better have at least one very good to excellent public speaker in a major C-suite exec role at every major public company. Chappie obviously is not that person, so maybe have someone else present new P&R ideas to the public?

Also, I was referring to Walt, not Roy.

I'm of the opinion that you should hire people who have talents that lie in artistry and creativity to be in charge of an entertainment company, but that ship sailed a long time ago. :( The fact that the parks are now lumped in with "Consumer Products" tells me everything I need to know.
Don't disagree with any of this.

I'm amazed there are folks able to defend this guy.
 
#16
"‘It doesn't make sense to hire smart people and then tell them what to to, we hire smart people so they can tell us what to do." - Steve Jobs

"We hire people, tell them what people think they want based on surveys we commissioned, and then we have them to go do that while spending as little as possible. Or else we just have them copy things from other Disney properties from around the world, because that costs less as well." - Bob Iger/Bob Chapek
 

DDLand

Well-Known Member
#19
Because Walt Disney said “Disneyland will never be completed,” everything else he said, believed, and did are irrelevant and dated.

I find that press point infuriating. Only extremists argue a complete freeze in time. Most want quite the opposite of stagnation. They want innovation! I know I do.

Do I want respect for what was there before? Yes. But is there a lot of leeway? Absolutely.

A great example would be the beloved Big Thunder Mountain Rail Road. It has aspects very similar to the Mine Train Through Nature’s Wonderland at Disneyland. It still celebrates the wildness of nature and the west. It also is still frontier. It is the perfect harmony between old and new.

The potential for harmony can be found in the wide tapestries of Adventure, Frontier, Fantasy, and Tomorrow.

Isn’t this the perfect time to be looking at the challenges (even risks) of the future, and the potential benefits? Imagine what we could learn from the things we did right and wrong on the American frontier.

Disneyland (and thus Magic Kingdom) was built on flexible settings that allow for countless stories to be told.

I’d love to see a Tomorrowland confronting the possibilities and risks of A.I., alternative energy sources, or robotics! Or what about a dark ride telling Native American stories in Frontierland (it’s not like exploring what happens when two cultures collide is relevant)?

Chapek is just too daft to see any potential beyond Woody awkwardly standing around in Frontierland.

Oh and apparently Space Mountain didn’t get the memo on the museum thing...
 
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