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News AK Giraffe in Labour on Stage

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
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Animal Kingdom Giraffe in Labour

My first thought at seeing this thread title was that Brexit politics is getting even weirder.


Anyhoo... http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/giraffe-birth-live/frequently-asked-questions/

What is the labor process?
Giraffes give birth while standing up so a calf enters the world from quite a height. They fall 6 feet to the ground with hooves and head first. The fall may seem like an abrupt entrance into the world, but it effectively breaks the amniotic sac, severs the umbilical cord, and most importantly encourages the calf to take its first breaths. After the calf drops to the ground, the mother will begin to clean it off, and after a few minutes, the calf will attempt its first steps.​
 
That really surprises me, that the giraffe was still on stage. I know that over at Kidani, on the savannah, there was a zebra who was very pregnant, due to "give birth any day now". I watched the animal keepers following her around, collecting her poop. They told me that a few days before delivery, the hormone levels change drastically, and that shows up in their poop. As soon as the hormone levels indicate, they'd move Mom to backstage. I'd think they'd have a way to predict giraffes giving birth and take them backstage also. I got the impression that they really don't want them out and about. Then after birth, they keep everyone backstage for a period of time, and reintroduce them slowly (a few hours at a time) to the savannah.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
That really surprises me, that the giraffe was still on stage. I know that over at Kidani, on the savannah, there was a zebra who was very pregnant, due to "give birth any day now". I watched the animal keepers following her around, collecting her poop. They told me that a few days before delivery, the hormone levels change drastically, and that shows up in their poop. As soon as the hormone levels indicate, they'd move Mom to backstage. I'd think they'd have a way to predict giraffes giving birth and take them backstage also. I got the impression that they really don't want them out and about. Then after birth, they keep everyone backstage for a period of time, and reintroduce them slowly (a few hours at a time) to the savannah.
It can actually be dangerous for a calf especially around male bulls.
 

Rider

Well-Known Member
That really surprises me, that the giraffe was still on stage. I know that over at Kidani, on the savannah, there was a zebra who was very pregnant, due to "give birth any day now". I watched the animal keepers following her around, collecting her poop. They told me that a few days before delivery, the hormone levels change drastically, and that shows up in their poop. As soon as the hormone levels indicate, they'd move Mom to backstage. I'd think they'd have a way to predict giraffes giving birth and take them backstage also. I got the impression that they really don't want them out and about. Then after birth, they keep everyone backstage for a period of time, and reintroduce them slowly (a few hours at a time) to the savannah.
Life finds a way...
 

Mat Cauthon

Well-Known Member
AK Giraffe in Labour on Stage
I read the thread title and my first thought was "They actually built a stage and made an attraction out of a giraffe giving birth?!?! What is this, the state fair animal barn?" I blame my thought process on it being Monday and not enough coffee yet.
 

KBLovesDisney

Well-Known Member
Animal Kingdom Giraffe in Labour

My first thought at seeing this thread title was that Brexit politics is getting even weirder.


Anyhoo... http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/giraffe-birth-live/frequently-asked-questions/

What is the labor process?
Giraffes give birth while standing up so a calf enters the world from quite a height. They fall 6 feet to the ground with hooves and head first. The fall may seem like an abrupt entrance into the world, but it effectively breaks the amniotic sac, severs the umbilical cord, and most importantly encourages the calf to take its first breaths. After the calf drops to the ground, the mother will begin to clean it off, and after a few minutes, the calf will attempt its first steps.​
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
That really surprises me, that the giraffe was still on stage. I know that over at Kidani, on the savannah, there was a zebra who was very pregnant, due to "give birth any day now". I watched the animal keepers following her around, collecting her poop. They told me that a few days before delivery, the hormone levels change drastically, and that shows up in their poop. As soon as the hormone levels indicate, they'd move Mom to backstage. I'd think they'd have a way to predict giraffes giving birth and take them backstage also. I got the impression that they really don't want them out and about. Then after birth, they keep everyone backstage for a period of time, and reintroduce them slowly (a few hours at a time) to the savannah.
I am by no means an expert on the subject, but I don't believe the same is true for giraffes.

Remember back in 2017 when the whole world watched for what seemed like forever for April at Animal Adventure in Harpursville to give birth? Based on the info released from that experience, locking down a due date for a giraffe is rather hard. About the only clue seems to be their water breaking and even that can be missed. To make matters worse, they actively hide the symptoms of labor.

If a giraffe did actually give birth on stage it is a good possibility that the vets on staff we just as surprised as the guest riding KS at the time.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
I don't know if it's common but it is the second time that has been brought to my attention. Once was years ago at the Granby Zoo in Canada when I witnessed it, legs first, if I recall the location. I know it was in Canada. And now we hear about this one. I am surprised that people think that out on the real savanna they haul in the Giraffes to give birth. Animals have been giving birth out in the open for years and years and years. Now all of a sudden they should be taking a cab to the delivery room. Remember, as mentioned before, back not that long ago when everyone was glued to their devices to watch April give birth and it took forever? Nature knows what it is doing and that ride is about nature, how much more real can it get. It's not like watching the conception. Talk about theming and immersion.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I don't know if it's common but it is the second time that has been brought to my attention. Once was years ago at the Granby Zoo in Canada when I witnessed it, legs first, if I recall the location. I know it was in Canada. And now we hear about this one. I am surprised that people think that out on the real savanna they haul in the Giraffes to give birth. Animals have been giving birth out in the open for years and years and years. Now all of a sudden they should be taking a cab to the delivery room. Remember, as mentioned before, back not that long ago when everyone was glued to their devices to watch April give birth and it took forever? Nature knows what it is doing and that ride is about nature, how much more real can it get. It's not like watching the conception. Talk about theming and immersion.
Oh for sure. It’s just strange for a place like Disney to have it out in the open, this clearly was unexpected.
 

PREMiERdrum

Well-Known Member
Given the mortality rate of giraffe calves during and soon after birth in captivity, I'm surprised at this. Additionally, not being able to quickly and safely isolate the calf should an issue arise creates may extra, unnecessary risks.
 
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