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Pixar's Coco.

Discussion in 'Animation, Movies, TV' started by Sped2424, Aug 14, 2015.

  1. Sped2424

    Sped2424 Well-Known Member

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    The Day of the Dead film has lived on! Now titled coco!
    D
    isney Pixar’s Dìa De Los Muertos inspired film “Coco” centres around Miguel a 12-year-old boy who lives in Mexico who sets off a chain of events that change his family & explore their history #D23Expo
     
  2. Disneyhead'71

    Disneyhead'71 Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad this is moving forward. Seems a bit outside the box.
     
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  3. Sped2424

    Sped2424 Well-Known Member Original Poster

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  4. Sped2424

    Sped2424 Well-Known Member Original Poster

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    Loving the style already.
     
  5. RandomPrincess

    RandomPrincess Keep Moving Forward Premium Member

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    Details from Entertainment Weekly -

    Also in the Pixar presentation at D23 Expo, the animation house released new details regarding its Day of the Dead movie. Toy Story 3director Lee Unkrich’s next film, a story based around the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos, has a title: Coco. The film takes its name from the main character in the story and came from Unkrich’s fascination with the holiday about honoring the dead, which is celebrated with folk art that is both colorful and macabre. Unkrich said he was mesmerized by the “juxtaposition of skeletons with bright festive colors.”

    A clip of the movie featured a candy-colored Mexican town populated by such creatures as happy, playful skeletons in brilliant dresses and crisp sombreros, dancing and playing mariachi instruments. They play their ribs like xylophones, à la Disney’s 1929 animated short The Skeleton Dance. Occasionally, one of the musicians’ jaws falls off, and Miguel, a living little boy who visits the town, helps put him together.
     
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  6. RandomPrincess

    RandomPrincess Keep Moving Forward Premium Member

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    Meet Miguel -

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016
  7. Sped2424

    Sped2424 Well-Known Member Original Poster

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    Wow as a latino to finally see a pixar character who looks like someone I could know I just think this is amazing.
     
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  8. RandomPrincess

    RandomPrincess Keep Moving Forward Premium Member

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    My brother Miguel will be very excited.
     
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  9. Sped2424

    Sped2424 Well-Known Member Original Poster

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    HA NOW THAT is awesome :D
     
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  10. RandomPrincess

    RandomPrincess Keep Moving Forward Premium Member

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  11. Direwolf27

    Direwolf27 Well-Known Member

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    All 3 of the leads are male...
    :arghh:

    Toy Story: 2 male leads: 0 female leads
    A Bug's Life: 2:2 (Flik, Hopper/ Atta, Dot)
    Toy Story 2: 2:1
    Monsters, Inc: 2:0 (And I'm pretty sure Randall and Waternoose have more lines than Celia, Roz and Boo)
    Finding Nemo: 2:1
    The Incredibles: 3:2 (I'm counting each family member minus Jack-Jack as a lead, plus Syndrome)
    Cars: 3:1 (at this point I'm feeling lenient, so Sally gets to be a lead character)
    Ratatouille: 2:0
    WALL-E: 1:1
    Up: 2:0
    Toy Story 3: 2:1
    Cars 2: 2:0? 3:1? I'm having trouble remembering the characters involved, but maybe it was 2:1, since Lightning didn't have much of a part.
    Brave: 0:2
    Monsters University: 2:0
    Inside Out: 0:2 (1:3 if you include Riley and Bing-Bong)
    The Good Dinosaur: 2:0 (I didn't see it, so correct me if I'm wrong)
    Finding Dory: 2:1, or 3:1 if you include Hank
    Cars 3: looks like it will be 2:2, surprisingly

    I know that women get a ton of diverse roles on the Disney side of things, but this pattern is distressing.
     
  12. RandomPrincess

    RandomPrincess Keep Moving Forward Premium Member

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    Actually even in Disney Animated films where the girl is the lead character and even if they are named in the title - the ladies get a lot less screen time/talk time then the male characters. The women are in the lead but are mostly surrounded by male characters. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...d-other-disney-movies/?utm_term=.75c0c28007ba

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Direwolf27

    Direwolf27 Well-Known Member

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    Aladdin isn't one I would call a 'princess movie', even though Jasmine is in it. Mulan makes sense, since she was in a Chinese army full of men. But yeah, it's distressing. Especially in the case of Frozen. That movie was supposed to have more women, and they cut them out. The Duke of Weaselton easily could have been a duchess (and I hope Disney remedies that for Broadway).
     
  14. Sped2424

    Sped2424 Well-Known Member Original Poster

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  15. RandomPrincess

    RandomPrincess Keep Moving Forward Premium Member

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    Me too!
     
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  16. RandomPrincess

    RandomPrincess Keep Moving Forward Premium Member

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    “It was important to us from day one that we had an all-Latino cast,” Unkrich said. “It focused us, and we ended up with a fantastic mix of people — some from Mexico and some from Los Angeles.”

    Benjamin Bratt and Gael García Bernal will lead Coco alongside newcomer Anthony Gonzalez, who will voice the film’s main character, a 12-year-old Mexican boy named Miguel. Gonzalez was hired after serving as Miguel’s scratch voice during early development, proving himself indispensable to both the filmmakers and the character. Character actress Renée Victor also joins the cast as Abuelita, Miguel’s grandmother.


    Coco follows the secret musical ambitions of Miguel, who resides in a lively, loud Mexican village but comes from a family of shoemakers that may be the town’s only music-hating household. For generations, the Riveras have banned music because they believe they’ve been cursed by it; as their family history goes, Miguel’s great-great-grandfather abandoned his wife decades earlier to follow his own dreams of performing, leaving Imelda (Miguel’s great-great-grandmother) to take control as the matriarch of the now-thriving Rivera line and declare music dead to the family forever.

    But Miguel harbors a secret desire to seize his musical moment, inspired by his favorite singer of all time, the late Ernesto de la Cruz (Bratt). It’s only after Miguel discovers an amazing link between himself and De la Cruz that he takes action to emulate the famous singer and, in doing so, accidentally enters the Land of the Dead.

    In the beautiful underworld, it’s not long until Miguel encounters the souls of his own family — generations’ worth of long-dead but no less vivacious Rivera ancestors, including great-grandmother Imelda. Still, given the opportunity to roam around the Land of the Dead, Miguel decides to track down De la Cruz himself. He teams up with another friendly (and skeletal) spirit — a trickster named Hector, voiced by Bernal — to find De la Cruz, earn his family’s blessing to perform, and return to the Land of the Living before time runs out.
     
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  17. Direwolf27

    Direwolf27 Well-Known Member

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    The story sounds really wonderful, and kudos to Disney for the all-Latino cast, I just wish it had more women :(
     
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  18. Sped2424

    Sped2424 Well-Known Member Original Poster

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    It has his grandmother his great grandmother and possibly more dead ancestors. I would wait until the film is out before getting down about it.
     
  19. Direwolf27

    Direwolf27 Well-Known Member

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    Don't get me wrong, I love almost all of Pixar's movies, and I'm really impressed with them embracing an all-Latino cast. It just bothers me when women and minorities typically draw the short stick when it comes to speaking parts.
     
  20. mimitchi33

    mimitchi33 Well-Known Member

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    Sounds very interesting. The plot reminds me of Trolls a bit. Here's why:
    In both films, there's characters who don't like singing because it related to someone's death.
    Also, because this isn't really a musical, it could be like Toy Story where the story is told through songs played in the background. I once read that this concept originated from Disney wanting to have the characters in Toy Story sing thanks to the success of their recent musical films at the time (The Little Mermaid, The Lion King), but Pixar refused to have that, and they compromised by making the songs the way they are in the film today.
     

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